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Empodera Latina
Empodera Latina

Season 3, Episode 2 · 1 year ago

The Oxy Complex with Anna LaMadrid

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

On this episode I sit down with Anna LaMadrid and discuss her newest show The Oxy Complex, a dark comedy about modern dating and the hormone that affects it all- Oxytocin. 

A Venezuelan born, East Coast-bred actor living in Los Angeles, Anna LaMadrid starred as sardonic, gum-snapping “Jamie” in the critically acclaimed IAMA production of Bess Wohl’s American Hero (“boundlessly funny” — Los Angeles Times) and is a Stage Raw Award recipient for female comedy performance for her take on “Betty 3” in Collective Rage: A Play in 5 Boops at Boston Court. Her TV credits include Vida on Starz (recurring); Love, Victor on Hulu; Call Your Mother and Grey's Anatomy on ABC; and she was selected to participate in the ABC Discovers Showcase. In 2016, she opened Put Me On Self-Tape, a self-tape and audition coaching studio in L.A. In 2021, she is launching The New Triple Threat® - a membership platform providing holistic training for actors at every level in their career.

Find tickets to The Oxytocin’s Complex at https://www.anna-lamadrid.com/

Show extended through the end of April!

A La Megas, me nombre Rita Bautista, and I am the founder of the Latina podcasters network, a platform created to globally amplify the voices of Latinas who podcast. I started my company because I wanted to hear the voices of my community and my people reflected back into my ears. Well, this podcast is dedicated to all of those dreamers and founders who decided that they also wanted to take a chance on themselves and create something for their community. In empoira Latina, you'll hear stories from CEOS to social media experts, MOMS, tech company owners and leaders from across the world that are all Latina's here to share their stories with you weekly. Stay tuned. Hey, everybody, we're back for another episode of Impodida Latina. I'm your host. Read about Tista, the founder of the Latina podcasters network, and today I have a special treat for you all. I am joined by Anna La Madri, who is a Venezuelan born East Coast bread actor living in Los Angeles, and them which I got ask I pout a Fedechi, Comigo. Thank you so much for being here with me. It is an honor to have you on. I'm so excited to be here and chat with you. They Alina, yes, yes, so in Bodida, Latina. For All of you who are listening, this is our second episode. is in as a podcast. It's dedicated to just that, right, offering stories of Impotamiento that I'Mucher Latina and Latin x community members who are also joining us. We are all inclusive, but obviously with a feminine touch. So today I'm really excited to talk to Anna because she worked on this project that was insanely phenomenal, as we just are moving past, or getting past, the pandemic and moving towards more of an opening of the country. And you know, it's called the oxy complex. Now, for those of you who are still feeling a little nostalgic or looking for some connection or wanting to learn more about how you just felt, I feel like Anna's performance in the oxycomplex is really kind of just going to bring this all full circle. So, Anna, tell me a little bit about your character in the oxycomplex and what the oxycomplex is actually about. The OXYCOMPLEX was originally created while I was in Grad School and at that point it was just like a fifteen minute an exploration we had to do like a solo piece or our second year in Grad School, and I was really interested in how technology was kind of like packing our dating because of these apps and making us, especially women, feel really competitive and jumping into relationships and becoming intimate with guys that we didn't really know, that weren't really good matches, and so oxytose and gets released. You become attached to these people, then they ghost you and you're like on this perpetual cycle of modern dating and it's like the drug is coming from the inside, like you know what I mean, like it's being released without me asking it to be released. I don't want to get attached. So I was really struggling with this idea of how do you become a self possessed, sexually free woman when our biology doesn't allow us to do that, and also like how unfair and competitive and exhausting online dating was. So that was the the fifteen minute seed. I'm a member of IAMA theater...

...company and we had our season completely planned before the pandemic hit and we had to quickly pivot and our artistic director, Stephanie Black, was like, you know, I think we should really do a virtual solo show season and and try to look for bipop voices, under represented voices that we can showcase. They had never really done solo shows before and I jokingly girl us through it out. I was like, you know, I wrote this little fifteen minute thing in school and stuff. was like, let me see it, and I was like, I mean, you know, it's trash and she watched it and she was like no, I think you need to expand this. I think it would be really great for you to expand this. So I'm really grateful that she pushed me in that direction, because as we were experiencing this loneliness of quarantine, I started to think about what happens when oxytocin gets cut off and we're dealing with someboddy who's going through withdrawal and what does that look like, and so I went into a deep dive of researching how it affects our attachment styles, how it affects men and women differently, and just really thinking about how this time is a time to break generational trauma and come to a sense of feeling worthy of love and also maybe forgiving ourselves a little bit for why relationships don't work out, because the odds are kind of stacked against us with technology and are nurturing. I love that. I mean it's supposed to be funny. Yeah, that's so serious about yeah, like I just I just like went there, but just know I'm also going to make you laugh. Yeah, and you know it's really interesting right, like, I'm single, I I've worked through everything you just said. I felt trigger, trigger, trigger, trigger, red flag, red flag. So I'm like modern day data right here. So I get it right, especially during the time of Covid I decided to take all the apps off my phone because I was like, first of all, I'm not about to be locked in a house. Second of all, somebody could walk in my house and then just like kill me right off bat because we didn't know what was going on. Right. So it's like that fear, that anxiety, but the loneliness creeps in at some point and then you're just trying to figure out all of these like why do I want to be overly nurturing? Why am I freaking out? What is going on? So I'm really excited that you had a chance to work on this project because it seems as though, and maybe it's just my circle, but Latinas in general are growing in education and we're working through breaking these generational trauma bonds and we're healing through all of this, but at the same time, marriage is getting pushed back more and more and more and more, and then we have the Hwai La lastias man has everybody's like what's going on? Yes, RN, I think that that's something that being bicultural is something that also isn't necessarily put on the landscape of media. You know, I think shows like Viva and one day at a time, where the first representations of seeing that struggle of like how you navigate between, you know, the culture that that your mom brought up was brought up in, versus this idea of being like an Americanized, you know, free woman and the guilt that comes with that. And so I do kind of represent that point of view of like somebody who's pushing you to settle down and maybe not be with somebody who's the best match for you, and this idea of you feeling like no, I have to be whole first, like I'm not ready for that kind of dysfunctional relationship that you're pushing me towards, because now we have access to like I don't need to financially be attached to a guy in order to make it right to like live the way that maybe my mom's generation had to. So it's tough because you feel like you're letting people down,...

...especially in a culture that doesn't allow for us to put ourselves first. Like self love is on the back burner, after college, job money, paying your parents back, right we before we got onto the interview, we were talking about this like immigrant debt, right like that, that concept of how do we pay back or pay forward the gift that they gave us by coming here? Yep, and you know, it's a very challenging space to be in, and so it's awesome that you're talking about the ability to do that in general. Just like no, I had to put myself first and I have to work through all these demons before, not even demons, but just like all of these things that are placed or put right in front of me, and working into communities and two cultures. Yeah, it's these stories and narratives that we tell ourselves that kind of keep us bound, and you know, I struggle it. There's also this idea that in order to be a good immigrant, you know, you have to be people pleasing, right, you can't let people down. You have to show up, and so I still sometimes struggle with saying no, and I feel like this last year, being in quarantine, I've I'm really just starting to draw a line, you know, because if I have a client or somebody who wants to work with me and I'm exhausted, sometimes I'll be like a fine, I'll do it, you know, as opposed to like maybe you need to rest, and there's this whole movement about resting being like radical right, especially for people of color who aren't allowed to rest, and so I'm really starting to embrace that part of it. You know that it's okay. Yeah, I've I was talking to a white friend of mine and I was like, I don't know what your life looks like like, you know what I mean? She's like I went to the beach, I went this, and I'm like, I don't leave my house, like I'm working ten twelve hour days, and she was like wait, you don't have like a day where you don't do nothing, and I was like no, you know, I feel like I'm wasting time, and so it's not wasting time to take care of yourself and I think that's the the re frame that I'm starting to do for myself, because nobody taught me that. Yeah, I don't think that. Like maybe this might be true. I'm not sure for you, but I'm working on this personally. is like setting better boundaries for myself, because for US culturally, setting boundaries and saying no is almost a slap in the face or like not being being disrespectful. Yeah, for sure. How are you reclaiming your your space? Um, you know, the more you start saying no this, the easier it starts to become. And you know it's hard for us. I don't. You're a business owner. I'm a business owner, and it's just like sometimes it can be all consuming, and I'm also somebody that gets re energized by work that I find fulfilling and I'm grateful enough that, with my company put me on self tape that I've been able to find something that actually fires me up and makes me excited. But that's a double edged sword, right. So I'm I'm learning. You got to take it day by day. That's all I can you know, because I'm always like, well, once this happens and I'll be able, but it's like no, Anna you're always going to want to go to that next level and do something else, you know. Yeah, so what is that next level look like for you personally? I mean with my business, we are launching and an educational arm of so put me on self tape, is an audition and self tape studio in La and with covid. When covid happened, I had to shut down the studios and we kind of pivoted to teaching classes online, which was really great at a time when we all needed community, and especially actors, who were sort of like displaced and scared about what was happening in the industry.

And so now we're creating online evergreen courses that can be accessible to all actors at a lower price, and we're going to be creating bipox scholarships, because I think a lot of times actors of color are priced out of good training, which leads to them not being cast, which leads to like a lack of representation in the media. So I'm really interested in you know, I have a huge student loan debt from my Grad School, but and I'm grateful for that experience. But you know, I think as actors that's of you don't want to walk around with that amount of debt in your life. So I thank you. Probably leave it that. You know, think you it being vulnerable and talking about your debt because, you know, I think a lot of people to almost feel as though it's like a weight, but then when carries around it, everybody has debt and until we actually start normalizing the conversation of having debt and how to move past having debt, you know we're going to still see it as a taboo. Yeah, and you know those trapple Soucio, Silla and Lakasa, but not anymore. We need to start talking about it more so that we bring out that trapples. Okay, bring out it, but I'm going to see those trapple socials. But I love a lost those won't those and that's how we develop more of a bigger community to like progress right and say no. But you know, I'm interested. Let's go back a little bit, because your backgrounds pretty interesting too. So where were you born? I was born in Venezuela, gottatus. Got My mom's Columbian we came to the US when I was eight years old and then my parents split when I was twelve and then, you know, I think my mom kind of went through this period of like rediscovering what she missed out from like having been married at thirteen, fourteen, you know, is she was like going out dancing and doing all this stuff. So, you know, I lived in Germany for a year with my sister, then I came back and moved in with my mom and then went back to North Carolina. So I went to five different high schools and was just constantly the new kid in school before I, you know, went to Undergrad and like left home and was able to like find broundedness. But I think, you know, especially for immigrants, this idea of home is something that we always feel displaced anywhere we go because, you know, Nii Ach need a yeah, and so movie, by the way, yeah, I get muddy. I doesn't get any credit anymore, but you know, I think that's why I gravitated towards art because in some ways stories when they're really powerful or universal, you know, and it doesn't matter the lens from which the story was created, it's just human experience. What do you think is been the most powerful part of your story? My my life story, or the show story? Your Life Story, you know, it's I think I'm still living it, but I'm really grateful that I had the courage to let go of a traditional life and like pursue the arts, because I was working at cartoon network, you know, like I had a corporate job. I had graduated Grad School, I mean Undergrad, and was going into marketing and advertising, you know, and I was doing it and I just felt a calling for something different. You know, I've always kind of been an entertainer. When I was young, my dad used to be a DP and in Venezuela worked for the the channel who maybe Beneviciona, I believe it was, and so it's always...

...been in me to be an artist. But again, you come to the country and it's like well, you have to be a doctor or a lawyer or this, and then you're like, all right, I'm going to negotiate and I'm going to go to Undergrad, but I'm going to be in marketing, which is creative, and so I just kind of let it all go and I feel so I you know, it's tough, obviously, but when I think about what my life could have been versus the experiences and the people that I've met and the stories that I've gotten to tell I wouldn't trade the struggle for for those experiences. And in what way do you think that there? Where is the connection between the character that you play in oxy complex and Anna Right now, like in present day? There's there are three versions of the character in the show, in the in the show there's a version of her in real time experiencing the pandemic, you see her in the past and then you see this idea of like Vivianna in the void, and that's like the higher consciousness that you don't normally connect to, but it's like your essence and you know, I think it's the one that can look back and be like, Oh, I have perspective on that now and I feel like I'm somewhere between that, you know, like that's my goal ultimately, and sometimes we fail, but it is that kind of when you align yourself with your third eye right and you're just like clear, there's clarity there. So yeah, hopefully I can maintain that spot. Are you looking for binge friendly podcast created by Lettinas or Latin X voices like yours and mind lettina podcasterscom is the largest platform globally amplifying the voices of Latina podcasters to find your newest addiction in self help, spirituality, religion, sexuality and so much more. Go to that, theina podcasterscom. There are over seventy podcasts for you to listen to and if you're a podcaster, you can also add your podcast to the directory. Go to LETINA PODCASTERSCOM for more information. It sounds like are you. Have you worked towards that higher like conducting to your consciousness or the higher consciousness? Have you been working through that and how did the oxy complex, Howe, help you or hinder that? You know, therapy is a good thing, so definitely have been in and out of therapy for years, but have been consistently in therapy since the pandemic began. It's interesting what happens when you write something and then you have to take off your writer hat and start building the character, and I started to see things that I didn't necessarily think about when I wrote it but that were just such a powerful discovery as an actor when I started to thread moments, and I mean I'll give away a little bit, but I think it's important. There's a scene where the mother character kind of announces to the children that she's getting she's moving away from the husband, right. So, like it's a divorce and I've always seen it as a moment of victimhood, right, like this is the moment where she loses everything. And as we were rehearsing, I might start crying. I just it hit me for the first time that this was a moment where the mother is actually modeling putting herself first and deciding that she's not going to sit there and allow somebody to perpetually cheat on her. And you know that she wasn't going to stay for the family, that she couldn't be there for the family if she wasn't there for her first. And like, when I wrote that scene, I did not think about that angle at all and then, as...

...we were rehearsing it, I was like, Oh my God, like this is the the the double edged sword, right, this is the gift and the curse, and it can happen all in one moment. And so that, to me was like such an important moment of like breaking generational curse. You know, like in that moment I was able to say, like no, I'm I'm doing exactly what I'm supposed to be doing by picking myself first. That's so beautiful. Is there any connection there with that, with that mother figure, to the experience that your mom had? Yeah, I mean I it's funny because Solo shows can be so vulnerable and you're like thinking, Oh my God, people are going to sit here and think that this is like my complete life story, and so then you try to like edit it because you know, I'm a Scorpios so also like I don't want you to know all my business. Yeah, but it was it. It's great to like separate the name, you know, like the Vianna is not Anna, and you know, I pull from my mom's experiences, from my aunt experience, from women in my life. So it's so that it's specific but again becomes universal. And you know, I had my director and the assistant stage manager. They were all women and you know, it was like a black woman, a white woman and to letting us, and I felt like when I did a scene and I heard them respond or be like no, I get that, I was like great, it's not just like a Lettino will get it right. It's like everyone can connect to these experiences. It's really great that you were able to showcase all of those women in general in in you know, this in this piece, in this in this work of art that you have creted. How is there a difference between working with a team of women and a working with a team of of men or a mixed team? I mean we had our sound designer, John was incredible, but he wasn't in the rehearsal room. And I think that there is something special about trusting the collaborator that you're working with, and especially with such a personal experience about like love and sex and how what it does to us. You know, I don't know that I would have felt as comfortable revealing so many parts of myself in that way, because you you always have to pull from yourself in order to create a complex character. And, like I said, it was like a beautiful communion that we created during rehearsals because I would say something and then, you know, the stage manager would be like, I feel that way sometimes, and then she would share something personal and it was like a Coven, you know. So that that was really special to me. That's awesome. You know, I think throughout this experience of growing the letting a podcasters network and the directory out for showcasing talent, it's I think people have their ability to be nurturing has definitely personally helped me continue growing. Like in business, it's so chale challenging because for the most part, a lot of things are very rigid and have to be a certain way in order for things to move forward. And it felt, it feels, at least for me, and I don't know if you've had this experience, but it feels like you have, like the support group that's like wanting to see you succeed, even more so, like women are moving that direction, away from cattiness and like pull down, but more like uplift and develop, and I don't know, but that something that you are also experiencing in that space for sure. And you know, even in in my business, I have a wonderful collaborator, Alicia, who helped me build this membership platform for actors, and I mean that's what we want to pay forward to other artists. It's like,...

...you know, those moments where we felt unempowered as artist and felt really bad, like I don't want them to have to go through this, you know. So let's arm you with the support and the tools that you need to be a healthy, thriving artist who has boundaries, who knows how to advocate for themselves, because for so long, you know, my mental health was in jeopardy because I didn't have the tools to do that. And there could have been. There were many moments where I was like, I don't have us, there's no space for me in this thing, and the oxy complex would have never happened if I had given up on myself. So I don't I don't want other people to experience feeling like they're not valuable as storytellers. Oh the value complex, the I'm not enough, yes, imposter syndrome. I feel like that is a underlining like in every podcast interview I've ever done with women, it always feels like imposter syndrome is at like the core of things and no matter how much work you've done on yourself, for how many years you've been in business, there's always that little tiny bit of imposter syndrome or the I'm not enoughness factor. What do you do to work at that? How do you go about working at impostor? Since it is a really good thing, and I'm going to go back to my mom because I remember this conversation. I think I was like twenty, twenty three or something, and she said, you know, I watched a lot of women skip ahead of me in career because I never thought I knew enough to do the job. And so she was like, my mom's an amazing seamstress. She makes patterns, she's made wedding dresses, I mean incredible, and she kind of say it stayed working out a factory for a really long time and people would try to like poach her to run a factory and she wouldn't do it and she was like, I watched women who knew less than me take those jobs, and so she was like, if you're scared to do it, just do it because you'll learn on the job. And half the time it's like I already knew it, I just didn't believe that I knew it, you know. And even in like opening up a Self Tape Studio and coaching, you know, I really dealt with a lot of imposter syndrome because I was getting theater awards but I wasn't booking TV and film work until much later, and so again I was like, well, who am I? Who's going to trust me? Who's you know, all these things, and I discredit it the ten years of like training that I had in my because I couldn't show and say, well, I'm a series regular on this thing. You know that having visibility and being booked on a TV show has nothing to do with your talent and your knowledge. There's so many things that are out of our control, and so I just had to leap and say there's gonna be a space for me. I'll land somewhere, you know. So yeah, just do it, even when you're scared. Yeah, and it seems to be a very common theme is like just keep doing it and then you'll get comfortable at some point. But what has been, to this day, your favorite, either show or theater performance that you've been involved in that you can say, okay, this is my favorite? That's really hard, but one of you know, because my acting teacher will be like, in your career you'll be able to have five experiences that are the best. So I will say I have to right now. I did Kanya Saidachos show and Fascada in New York, which you know. That's how I met her, and now she's like an incredible show runner and, you know, creating all these incredible stories for film and TV. But you know, I met her when she was doing theater in Chicago. And again it was an all female cast...

...and there was such a sisterhood and it was so much fun and it was the first time that I was given the opportunity to play like a bicultural. You know, I felt somebody that was really close to me, like I didn't have to change the way that I spoke or anything like that. I could just have fun in the world that she created. And then my other experience was when I first moved to La and I got cast in collective rage, which is again five women all about like female identity and it we started rehearsals like two weeks after trump had been elected and, you know, we were all really raw and kind of reckoning with what that meant for us women, and I just found that community like so helpful to get me through those first few months, because I just felt so defeated, you know, and here we were talking about pussy power and all that stuff. I was like yes, let's like recollect ourselves and pick ourselves back up, but we created a really strong community during those months of rehearsal. Community is so important, especially when you know you're working in those places, and I love that that is part of also like almost this entire you know, ripping open of like when you, like you said, talking about the Possy bowers, like, you know, these taboo things, but at the same time you're like working with other people together to like have this moment and that that's your favorite is really exciting. Speaking of your professional experience, why did you describe yourself as a late bloomer? Yes, because everything I started was late, you know, I started school early and I graduated early, but then I kind of went into this marketing career. So like I didn't really start acting or even pursuing acting, till I was like in my mid S, which, you know, a lot of people are like, well, that's when actresses start being put to pasture, you know. You know, it's like at when you turn twenty eight, your careers over, and I'm glad that things are changing, but for such a long time that was my Achilles heel. You know, if you don't know how many times I cried about like am I too old for this? What if I'm too old? And I'm grateful that I look young, but then it was like trying to hide my age and it was just so exhausting, you know, to be like well, I can't give out that reference, because then they're going to know I was born in this year. You know what I mean? Like how do I tell somebody that I went to high school but not give them the years so they can't figure it out? And it was like it was just the amount of time you spend in your head trying to negotiate it was was insane. So, you know, I just kind of had to let that go and trust that, you know, there's space retort storytellers of all ages, and especially now where this like new wave of showing older women in the media, you know, the stuff that Gina Davis is doing with her foundation. It's like it gives me, gives me hope that I don't have to be this like twenty three year old beautiful woman in order to have a career. You know what's really sad about that is that the definition of beauty, HM, is defined by every single person differently, but we allow the media to define beauty for us at well, was young. Yeah, young and fair skin for the most part. Right. I mean I think even in in letting on Latin X or the the Latino community, like when you be see young and the Lemundo, they all suffer from like very much so European complex and it's very hard and challenging for those people who are of, you know, Afro Latin X or Afro Lettino Communities and cultures that are like hey, you know what, I'm getting tired of not being represented here. I know growing up...

...in the states, here our experience and our family, we are we have Afro let you know, in our family and like we have never, they were never a fan of exp of talking about it. For the longest time I was always like, let's hide all of this stuff because this is an acceptable in certain parts of the community and to make it easier for you guys to ascend or whatever. They also didn't know we were crazy and we were just going to go and do it anyway. But but it's like, you know, it's kind of sad because our definition of beauty in our family is something completely different, right, and so why not allow the people, the audience, to define what beauty is, versus, you know, putting people out to pasture and she you know, like killing their careers because people age. It's just a avitable yeah, and you know, I get like longevity and all that stuff, but it's like there's there's got to be a balance. And it's also about how this country itself has an issue with discarding older people, and that's something that, you know, if I'm going to take another mantle, well, you know, like another fight. It's like how we disrespect the older generation or see them as useless, when they have so much knowledge for us and should be respected. It's pretty sad. It is sad and especially coming from our culture where, you know, our grandparents live with us or your parents move been with us at some point, it's like you kind of have no choice to just say yes and and we don't believe in old folks homes. That's very true. But you know, one of the things that I kind of regret is, like my my grandma passed away when I was an Undergrad and I really wish that I had taken the time to like record her stories, and I didn't, and so I started doing it with my mom, and that's another Sello show that I did for my thirty year in Grad school was about how she crossed from Columbia to Venezuela illegally with my aunt, and, you know, I interviewed both of them and I was like, I wish I would have gotten my grandmother's point of view with all of this, and now that's lost. It's that you're going to make me cry. My Grandmother was like my rock and she, yeah, those stories that you wish you would have captured. It's it's so valuable too, because they, I mean grandma's are like the root of the LETTINA's in the world right. They really are, like it's the food, it's the everything, they just they provide something completely different than our mother's do. And you know, yeah, yeah, maybe the next, maybe your next, your next. Well, you know, it's interesting because my mom's going through this thing of like I have a love hate relationship with facebook because, on the one hand, it makes if you're really connected to people. I mean she's in North Carolina, I'm in La so I don't see her as often, but then it's become such a crux that when I am with her, I have to be like put facebook down and talk to me, you know, because I'm really trying to excavate these stories when I'm with her. So, yeah, I just want to continue diving deep because it's such a rich family history. HMM. So, how do you really feel about social media? I mean, girl, I have a lovely relationship with it. You know, at some point I am trying to break up with facebook. I don't log in there as much as I used to. Instagram, I'm I'm active in because, you know, when you're a business owner, it's a good way to create community and have people know about you. But I really want to set boundaries about how much time I spend on it, and usually I'm pretty good, but right before bed I started going. I start going into deep dives and now I'm into like slime mashing videos that I don't know...

...why, but they are so relaxing and you know, people are just like making popping sounds with slime and I'm like how am I here? But you know, I mean that is also a self like a sense of self love, if that's what this connects you from like over consumption of things. Right, that's true. So no shame in the game, no shame in the no shame in the game. And also, I mean one of the things that people I'm always reminding myself is like remember, this is everybody's highlight real and not their real life. Right. So, like when I especially in the past, when I would get jealous or I would be like look, at them having fun. I'm not, you know, it's like I don't know what happened the moment before they snap that pick. You know, they could have been in a fight or they could have been crying about something. So I just try to manage my expectations and not compare myself to other people on there. I love that, especially being somebody in the entertainment industry, for you to say that, I think it's a very it's very telling of the fact that we have now moved in that direction to believe that these things that we're seeing are all a hundred percent real and it has to be the way it is. And it's like you don't know both sides of the story, guys. So some people are like half to post and when they don't want to put you know what I mean, like it's just it's draining to be a public figure, and I'm not even in that space yet, but I just can't imagine what it feels like to have to be on all the time. See as Comodios Atias, if you see device, is sit doing podcastering. Dip Indian. They so you Suvian, Theo podcast constantiment. What cannot the NAMOS Nakamuni's Conkin go like that. I would at think Las Lucium, Latina podcasters network. They're that going next, young a COMUNI, that the podcasters Eatambiento, that Tupropia, bahina and Addictorio Mas grand they lat enough podcasters in and Mundo. Then Musla Plata formaket go NICKTA, com discident podcasters, no it spit as must be sit the Latina podcasters, Punto, comparare Arte, a La Plata form, Mus Grande Demondo, the podcasters, I'm blify, Gondolas, bosses, the Latinos. So before we move into power our where we were going to ask you some rapid questions and then you have to go and answer the first thing that comes to the top of your head. Right. It's one thing that you want everybody to know about oxy complex. I want people to let themselves off the hook and forgive themselves for choices that were made in the past when you didn't have any awareness, and to understand that there are forces outside of you that affect why we're so lonely and single, and that has nothing to do with your worth. You got to watch the show to find out what those things are. So when does the show come out and how can they see it? It starts streaming March twenty one till April eighteen. You can go to I am a theatercom or Annas Lam madridcom to get tickets. It'll be a virtual kind of showing, so you'll have a week and you can watch the show anytime that week. So yeah, I hope you enjoy it, I hope that you laugh, I hope that you, you know, do some introspection and maybe grow a little bit. And will also have the information for the tickets and everything in the show notes, guys. So please make sure to check the show notes for the links and if you have any questions, you can always reach out to us and we can get you connected to Anna for you to see the oxy complex. Awesome. Well, are you ready for the rapid fire questions? Take a glass of water. So I'm ready, and the way this works is I'm going to shoot a question out there and you just answer whatever the first thing that comes at the top of your head. Okay, are you...

...ready? Yes, all right, three, two, one. What was the last song that you listen to on spotify? Oh my God, I can't remember the name of the song, but I have a playlist from my plants that I got from Latin X for plants and I love it. Plan, I can't remember. Yeah, I play music for my plants. Okay, that's nobody doesn't. We're in the world. Would you travel to right now? I Greece. FAVORITE MEAL GROWING UP? I did bus I did it. Buzz. Okay, coffee or tea? Coffee. How many cups of coffee do you drink in a day? One. Did you have a nickname growing up? Oh my God, girl, now you stepping into my trauma. I don't know if you know what my moons are. Yes, I do. My Moan was my because look at my eyes, girl, they're so big. Oh my God, I would cry because my cousins had like smaller eyes, so they were like, oh, the pully, but it's all hold them, Maman, and I would be like no, I want to be AH polyam one. Okay, who is your favorite family member? That's hard. My brother Damien, because he's the closest one to me an age and we went through a lot together. What cartoon character would you have star you in the movie of Your Life? Oh, Oh, Moana's hotels have a little print of it. B There, there, you can see it, but that that blue? Oh yeah, I got it. I went to a screening of it in a Disney and they gave us print and I was like, I'm putting this up. I cried so much. It was so beautiful. It is a beautiful than the songs to that movie and my mouth forever. I what was the last TV show or movie that you watched? To all the boys, I loved before. I watched that last night. I was trying to see if it passed the back deal test. It did not. What is the back deal test? It is this test that was started by a female queer writer that talks about how women should be represented in media, and it's like there's a whole criteria and it's like, does a woman do spend more than three lines where she doesn't talk about a guy? And if she doesn't, then that's one of the criteria to pass the back del test. And I'm like, the title itself, she's talking about guys. Fail. But yeah, wow, you just gave me something to think about. Yeah, you look at look it up. There's like what you can do a whole deep dive, but I was looking for it and through that Lens just to see, like and I'm like even the clips that they showed up the golden girls in the movie, like Blanche was talking about a guy, and I'm like not even the clips of the TV show there watching it's the over me about something other than men. Yeah, you break it by heart here and that's okay. That just means we can move from here and change things right, for sure. Yeah, okay, last question, well, actually second to last question. If you had to delete three APPs from your phone, which ones would you delete? Well, already deleted facebook, so I'm very proud of myself for doing that. I was gonna say I'm a feeling it's facebook, but I deleted facebook. What are some of the I have a love hate relationship with Marco Polo. That would probably be next because, you know, I got a pay now to upgrade to fast forward to some of these message is. Like sometimes I'm like...

...sixty deep and I'm like I'm not gonna Watch. This is three hours of my life sit here catching up on Marco Polos. Okay, what's the last one? Let me look real quick, just so I I feel like there's just random things that sometimes I don't even use, like postmates. I don't really order postmates, but it's just on there just in case. I just got to clean it up. Posts made group on. You've been chopped. Yeah, by by. All right. And the last question is if, tomorrow morning you walked out of your house and someone deposited ten million dollars in your bank account, how would you go about spending it? I would just love to continue finding ways to tell stories and, you know, maybe make a feature or a film or something, a passion project and reinvested in my art. But first I'm going to travel, because I feel like, you know, it's immigrants. Were always like scared about money, that we're never going to have enough, and like when's this going to fall out from undermine? When am I going to have to struggle? And it's just like to not have to worry about that. I didn't even know what that to do with myself, you know. So I would need that time to like reconnect and be like okay, now that you don't have that, who are you? HMM. And you're going to Greece first, right, go on Greece first. It's awesome. Well, and it has been such a pleasure to have you on today. On imposed a Latina thank you, red ahead, such a great time. Thank you so much, and you guys again. Make sure to check the show notes so that you can get your tickets to the oxycomplex and check out this amazing, amazing piece of work by Anna Lamadid. Thank you. Thanks for tuning in to and Bodida Latina podcast with your host. Read Aboutista. I'm hoping that you got a chance to fill yourself up with amazing, empowering stories from Latina's like you and I. For more information on Latina podcasters network, go to Latina podcasterscom. We also have a directory of over seventy podcast listed there, all made by Latina and Latin X podcasters. Follow us on Instagram, facebook and all your social media platforms, and don't forget to rate and subscribe to this podcast. And remember, keep it positive or don't keep it at all.

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