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Empodera Latina
Empodera Latina

Season 3, Episode 3 · 5 months ago

Latina Author Luz Maria Mack Embraces Her Identity Through Children's Books

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

On this week’s episode I am joined by Luz Maria Mack, a bilingual children’s book author with the belief that diverse stories matter. 

Luz was born in Villa Mella, Dominican Republic, and immigrated to the United States as a young child with her family. She comes from a loving and big family that is a recipe for laughter and lots of beautiful memories. Luz earned a Masters' degree in Public Administration from Metropolitan College of New York and works as a healthcare professional in New York City. 

You can find her colorful collection of books on her website https://luzmack.com/ to diversify your babies’ bookshelf! 

Olamiamnbritaodista and I am thefounder of the Latina podcasters network, a platform created to globallyamplify the voices of Lathinas who podcast, I started my company, becauseI wanted to hear the voices of my community and my people reflected backinto my ears. Well, this podcast is dedicated to all of those dreamers andfounders who decided that they also wanted to take a chance on themselvesand create something for their community in en Poeraladina you'll hearstories from CEOS to social media experts, MOMS tech, company owners andleaders from across the world that are all Latinas here to share their storieswith you, weekly stay tuned Ollamigas were back for an episode ofImpodera Ladina and today I'm so excited to have one of my really greatfriends, loose Mudyamac, an author, a mother and an awesome Badass. Who is anentrepreneur and continues pushing through every single day lose. Thankyou so much for being here with me. I am honored to have you on. Oh, my God,Bessi, I'm so hod to be with you and seen you in all your Savlo on you.That's my girl, like you so much, so you guys just aquick background. I got a chance to meet loose last year during thepandemic and we met in the INIA dream accelerator that is hell stood by Deni,solidcox she's a filmmaker, and I mean she does just everything that you need.She's, like a fairy godmother, Rina right there lean, Leslamaoen Eso, and you know one of the great thingsabout being in an accelerator program with ladinas in general. Is that youget to connect to people who are really creating waves in in our community indour culture and doing some amazing things, and I got a chance to connectwith loose and Luse has been basically my soul sister from the moment I mether, so I'm really excited for her to be here a little nervous because youknow she's, like my sister and family, and it's always just so exciting, tohear and let people talk about. The amazing works that they're doing soloose. I'm really happy to have you here. Oh my God. I don't notice me. Ilove it. So Luc you're really proud of beingwhere you're from so. Why don't you tell us a little bit about yourbackground like where were you born, and how did you get here? Yes, so I wasborn and Begameya had a Bunaka, the Mincana, a beautiful island, also knownas the MINICA Republic, but I'm very much a dominic in You York,which means you are born in the island for Raisein New York City fromWashington Heights, like talk about like Bam, Bam. Man Bam like I hit allthe corners. So a lot of my culture and upbringing was like really trying mybest partness, like my cultural upbringing, from the agree, public andbeing here like you know, Media Cam me the IYEA like very meican from there,but very Washington high from here, and I grew up with a lot of individuals andhit my age that had the same experience. So it was very much something I grew up,learning and loving, but at when I was little at first, I was like wow thissuck, like you, don't feel so special right, but you learn to embrace it.When you get older and you love it, what was that one thing that helped youreally like embrace being dominicing, Yourwekan or Y got Coemnickan York, Yeahny York?That's the thing! No socks wearing...

...sneakers walking up dykeman, be like ohon get in my phone gall. You know like going out eating going to the bestrestaurants and when music comes out loud, you know it's summer in New York,when you know you hear bad bulny right now, because that's the thing or I'veen thout: U playing now and you just dance on the street like there's noproblem with that. So that's how you know you're from New York and happen tobe Dominican, so a little Mofongo, some bottchat that a personally. I can alsofeel that statement that you said MEDIAC, Uia yeah. I think a lot of thepeople that are listening to have either experienced that or goingthrough that now and it's so it's so funny, because I remember that moviefrom Ne India Mydia and it never realized that it was Mo pivital, rightor so important to like explain that experience right of how do we createthat bridge between being from another country or having cultural connectionsto another country and then being here every time you walk outside of YourHouse you're, experiencing something completely different versus what youfeel on the inside you've been able to take that and embrace it and now almostmolded into what you're doing for your profession and how you're able totranslate that into your books. No, I was going to say it's hard because whenyou're growing up, like you learned to edit yourself and I'll use that workbeaus, we use that you used it previously, like you're kind of scaredto show your true self and a lot of like realms like a professional round,an demia realm and all these rounds. Because people, I don't know whathappens but like when you get older. There's a sense of like you know youget a little you could ave like. Oh, I can't do this. I can't do that. Likeyou just you just you're playing double Dutch, you don't know when you're goingto jump in, but you know you can't be yourself when you do jump it. You haveto be like on your PS and Qes, but then I started noticing individuals that Irespectad the most and I learned a lot from they were themselves a hundredpercent like they enjoyed it. They welcome you to be yourself. So that'swhat kind of like triggered me to say. Like hey like Ithere's only one of me and I have to you, know people have to love me or orleave me as I am so. The pimital moment for me was my kids,because I think they were struggling to identify who they are. I still thinkthey're going to go through that Anvite, because no matter how much hasapparently try to coach them and help them. They always go through thesepaces right. So seeing my kids go through that kind of like kind of jumpstart something and me saying like who am I as a mom boy, an Mi as a personand trying to helping them kind of see that and like love it as well? How manykids do you have? Oh, my God, I have three. Oh my God just have one, but Ibeanse you know very expensive. I mean, but you know one day you see thosepeople being like. I Mommy I mean mome like you love it, but when they startasking for Jordan's and trips around the world and, like my son, asked melike be mom can be Renan: arbn b t the Hamptons. Oh my God, these this kid isasking for a house in the Hamdens and I'm looking at him like. I don't got noHamson money, not yet, but yeah it's coming! Speaking of not yet, but it's coming.What inspired you to start writing what inspired you to be? Like you know whatI gotta I got to talk to these kids. I got to give them a little bit of thisSusson that I have. I have to like figure out how to animate this like.How did you get that inspiration? Oh Wow, it really honestly, it really camefrom a lot of pain and I'm not going to say it was all roses. This shit is notfor the week at heart, and- and you know that, because we've had theseconversations, because when you have your kids, you relive alot of your pain and I have to be very brutal about that and it came. It camelike in such a funny way, my ten year old, jest Retese Car Book, The cheesystory that you saw- and I was still...

...proud of she when she was little. She asked meif she could die her hair blont and she just did in like how she looked. Shedidn't like her hair touched her. She just she was struggling so bad. Iremember I had a painting of an angel that my grandmother, Tay Heo, a manoand that's like a big thing. When people make things in our country likewe have to like almost like santify it and glorify it like, the angel wassupposed to be like looking over at the house, but the angel was white, blond,hair and it just like, like I remember, just looking at theangel and almost like, discussed, not because it symbolizes anything bad.Because here am I trying to tell a little girl who's like three or four atthe time, Love Yourself, you have beautiful hair and then I startedlooking at everything critically. You know the children's books that were outthere. There were barely any kids that look like her or represented ourfamilies. Then I have these paint that, like is that Bein Buda Ichamano theystay on Han and then like a lot of her family is a variety of shapes, but shejust felt so different. It just made me think about my own insecured when I wasyoung and like it spoke a lot to me, but I think the biggest struggle waswhen I dropped her off to she was going tothe private nursery and it really kick home. When I saw her play were herthree little friends, her three little friends. Look like sisters, they're,not sisters, they're, just you know their friends and they all looked alikeright. They all had like lighter hair, laidher, eyes, White Skin, and I couldsee boy doing this to her hair, like shes like really really morning to looklike them and she had her cute little. I think it was Pano andersor littledress to match her friend Butshe, just felt like she stuck out so much and she was just like Mama really want tohave blond hair. That was it that pain like really stuck out there. So I was really like Thi shot. I talked toher teacher about what what can I do like and the the school itself is abeautiful school. They try to talk about loving the color you're in insuch a positive way with food. They took like chocolate, budge, Vanilla andall these tives and had the kids tastes saying how yummy and how our skin tonesare just like food, like we're all Yungy ind our delicious way. It was sofunny and and and talk about like talk about like what a simple way to talkabout diversity with colors of food that were like crames all the way toreal chocolate. But then she talked to me about tellingstories about my own family or about leaders that we love and that's what inspire me to tell my childhood storyand when I was doing that, I took it a step further and decided tojust write a book about it. But I had no clue how to write a book, never doneit before. Needless to say, I don't know any writer like in my network offamily and friends than ever written a book. So I was like okay, I'm going towrite a book, but I was really Sangit teanava without knowing anything andthat's how it came about. That's pretty powerful because for a lot of letinasin this country in general, like a lot of us, didn't have that role, modelfigure to say: okay, I can be a writer. I can be an author, I could be. I meana podcast network owner right like I can. I don't have anybody to model thatoff of but the end of the day. That audacity is soimportant, and it's so awesome that you are almost like self motivated to dothase kind of things, and now that's translated into your daughter who nowshe can look up to you and be like oh well, my mom was in office was no bigdeal like I could just I just write a book attend it's not a big deal butlike you'R, you know like you've paived...

...these ways for people who naturallywouldn't have excuse me naturally wouldn't have that mentor to do those kinds of things, andsometimes people have to do the hard things in order for a new generation ofpeople to come through that that difficult time you know that difficultbase. So how do you motivate yourself in those times that you're, creatingand Youre you're, basically like breaking the concrete? How do youmotivate yourself to get up and break the concrete? It was weird because,honestly, I wasn't doing it for any money. I wasn't doing it for thinking this was going to becomeanything of it. I did it for you know those little eyes that when she saw thebook she shared it at her school and mind you. My my daughter goes to apretty bad assschool with like a lot of already self made individuals likeauthors, people that own a lot of like amazingthings and she was just so proud. She's, like my mom, is going to come and do anauthor but like she was like selling it, and I think that's what motivated me.It came from somewhere, but I was honestly pure pure love of my child right now. She doesn't think I'm prettyawesome, rightbut, that's a different story, so let's keep it one hundredpercent real, but when she was in kindergarten I was like I was it. I wasbetter than spice spread to her, but that translated into me actually being like. Oh my God, I amthis author, like Harseing me like that, and then I decided that I had morestories to do lik or more steries to share, but it was that it was like. Howcan I motivate my kids and now I'm writing like almost out of habit,because I love it, but I wouldn't have discovered that if I want't adartmyself, you know what I mean Hmmh. So do you still struggle with imposterousyndrome because it sounds like you know. You didn't believe that you were anauthor until it came out of you but itis a his, so ye tain throu the Lunoright you're, almost like this constant battle with this person on the insideof who you really are and then like. Oh, it's really happening right. So do youstill battle with Impossorson Drom Yeah? I really do. I think it was like in aconversation with the niece, I'm like I'm an author. I said it but, like Isaid it, almost surprising ee, like Oh sh, lucy, already grow like five bucks.What are you talking about and I'm like? No, no but like listen to what I'msaying like like, I used to say I dabble andwriting, but I had no ide, I like claiming it it's. It was like one ofthe biggest stefs in my life. The other step that was really amazing to me wasrealizing that, even though I'm an author wanted to produce beautifulcontent as animations, and I didn't think I had that enme, I stillwant to Animae and possibly go into producing more work,but it had a stirt from somewhere, like you have to start doing like the firststep. Like N, I started with something as simple as writing things down in apaper, but like there were times, I didn't think it wasgood there. There were times. I still didn't believe I was doing this, butwhen I did it and I saw a finished product regardless of how people felt Iwas like. Oh my God. That's me like this is all of me. Not. You know thisis pure me. This is an area of me like, and I kept loving each side of me in aweird way. I feel, like I've, become more confident and love myself morebecause I was able to dare and push myself more and there's. No, you knowthere's a lot of haters out there and a lot of people that was stay negativethings when someone's trying to do something good, but I didn't carebecause I was like I'm finally living my moment and discovering my truth,love that and discovering your truth.

You've been able to create how manybooks at this point, oh my Godso, we're stepping into number eight to theOkieta. It's really nine, because I really helpe my daughter, so I had a Ihave to kind of say I kind of quote produce her book. Although she says no,it was only her. My daughter illustrated it and she was the thewriter of it, but I did help with the edit and a lot of the art that work asshe did. So I helped her look that thing a little critically. So she'sreally excited about that 'awesome. So what are the names of some of the booksthat are out there right now? So right now, one of the most famous project isthem idea project. What I call is baking Almigdy on Little Maria MadianaSuper Ido, that the mar te Super Helper mydy, other studes, vilet Maria,discovers her dance. There's animations Pied into those books, they're allbilingual and there's instagram filter so kits- could enjoy it in multiple wayand the last book of Maria was published through Dominican writers,astotiation, which ist an amazing patform for anyone who's interested inbecoming a writer. They do give and provide a lot of resources. Another book that I did was Natalie thebrave and it was recently featured in New York- cares here in New York Citywhich to me it was like. Oh my God like. I think I was telling the needsomething funny about it, because I was like. Oh my God. I present E to asponsor company, my book, and they like this for like woman's Woman's month. Iwas like I never I never. I never thought you know it would get thatrecognition and when I voted last year when I first joined EDA, it was likethis book is special and I fel something special about the book. Butto hear a company say no, this book is really special and it's going torepresent this our community. I was like it happened like I felt like Imanifested that opportunity, and some of my other books won is inspired by myson is called. Let's brush brush brush ar EAC together, tetakes frush me histeeth and the elephant family parade case. Thos, like the thems, are alllike related to your family, like you're, getting inspiration from yourfamily, which is pretty cool yeah and if they ever feel like, I don't lovethem. They could just look at the collections of books like the only bookthat it's not really about my family would. All with all honesty is ititstarts with you, because that that was a song inspired by something that I watched in the news.That was really sad and it was like that shooting in that club in Florida and they a little a lotof GAM people, and I think I was inspired by one of the new stories on that thing. That happened that was reallytraumatic. was that what would make a child pick up a gun and decide? He hate,P hate, PP, tates people so much that he wanted to kill them. So it was thatkind of like reclaiming our power and trying to tell kids like you know,you're powerful, and you have a lot of love to give oal like you know, andthere's people out there that don't know you would love you. So I getemotional when I think about it, because my we have loved ones that are gay and wewould hate for them to get coash of anyate crime. I think one of the thingsabout our community and our culture in general is: We need to do better ataccepting gayness s as something more natural versus it being something thatchanges a person altogether like. If we get to that point where we all justaccept each other, like those things, don't really matter, because it's notlike we're sitting there in their bedrooms with them, people should just allow people to do whatever they pleaseand stop that hate for others, just because it's probably just somethingthat they don't understand. Yeah I mean...

I remember that shooting in Orlando wasso horrible. It was so impactful at impacted me like for a whole month,like I remember like crying about it and it and you could like in allhonesty, I didn't know anyone personally that died there, but it waslike enough to shake me to the core to be like wow like this. Is The trueworld we're coming to that? If we don't manage our emotions or our feelings orhelp kids, you know there was a saying when that shooting happened like backin the day you cared about your children and the children was that weredown the block and the C the society that we're living in. We only careabout our children and forget the kid down the block, because they're not aresponsibility. I feel like I want to take it back to that mentality likeyeah. There's, some kids there that aren't being taken care of that therarestill aur responsibility. There are still our problem and I don't want touse the word problem, but if that's how others see it like, they have the rightto feel love by others too, by thei features by their community andinspired so we need, I feel, like there's a lot of ways to do better andI hope and I pray that I have those opportunity, so I could show thatthat's pretty powerful. I mean how do you think I remember growing up as kids right, wecould go outside and play and, like most kids didn't want to stay insideand most of these kids nowadays, like you, don't see kids on the street, likeyou used to, like I remember, being out there, a Gande, Gritalaam, okay, theycallt yeah, yes, TM popi. Remember, like you know how how they'll be like?Oh, don't send your child without an adult outside now. My mom would sendall of us and be like go to the park and don't come back til, it's likeeight or nine o'clock. Iyeahe, sorry Mommy, if you're listening to them, butyou didt say that Shit Yeah. So we were like us getting dirty or mestitting, like hownt play no more. I want to eat food and beo watching TV.But, like you know, you know there. A lot of people didn't have luxuries ofbabysitting or after school programs, and things like that, so us beingoutside and playing with each other was our you know our source ofentertainment yeah. It was our facebook in our instagram back that that was oursocial yeah, that was tick Tok or, like I told my kids, that was tee thack. Theoriginal TIKTO CSCOMOOCITAFSLAVISS Sedon podcaster independiente e Seyer, Suviando podcast, Consantemente, Porquinoemnain,ourangasucion, Latina podcasters network Teta, connecs young, a commonythat the podcasters Itumbianteda to Propa Pahina, an deretoriomas Grande deLatina podcasters in Enmundo, the NEMOLAPATA fomaque OADTENTA podcasters,no sperismus be Sitalatina PARCAS respon to comrae pcasters Amplificando as Bosssdelatinus. Well, you know what I was going to askyou. A question like would have been some of the challenges that you facedduring. I would say your production of your books or like creating like whatare some things that you are like man, that that was a challenge or like thatwas difficult to face. I feel like each bug and moment of creation was a challengebecause there you know, I I like I for the most part, I've been aself published author, so raising the money getting the artist to work with me onthe projects and then paying for editing paying for all theseapdditional things have been challenged, getting Bata readers...

...getting Bana readers that understoodthe message. I think one of the most challenging thing it was with myfirst book. I didn't understand any of that process. You know, because I justdid it on my own for my child right, but once you get better, you learnother skill sets that come along with it. You know- and I remember there wasthis one veder that told me they didn't get it or they didn't get. Why neededto be bilingual and it kind of hurts to my for because they didn't say anything wrong. Youknow they just stayed at something that they didn't relate to, but it also mademe realize how much work we had to do to show how there's a lot of Cultushere that are represented and there's a lot of storylines that are not beingaccepted. I think Americais very much a one sided story, and I say Americabecause that's you know in publishing country and the publishing industrywere still a one sided story, so they keep saying is the American story, butthat's not true. You know like there's, not capturing all of us and whereAmerica's pretty much a melting poptat is still not represented. As such, wesaw that with that book American dirt. I don't know if everybody remembersthat last year that was a baer yeah. It was such a horrible controversy because, as a person who believes in the freedomof speech, I felt bad for the woman because of her. It was her work right.Essentially, at the end of the day, she was kind of put in a position where gota deal. She got a book deal to write a book and I'm pretty sure any one of usif we are at the height of our creative journey, get a deal and that deal looksgreat. You don't know what the backlash is going to be and they kind of usedher. I wouldn't say they used her, but itwas a pon move right, like yeah yeah, that's supposed to be talking about theimmigrants journey to the US and you let somebody who has neverexperienced that has never has no connection to it other than thefact that she ror their name to it right right. Let's get to the Nitty Ge,it Gretty Tat Han the experience of Chang, your name to be American to be.You know like, like I understand, think they're, not really speaking of that that that journey like they didn'tjourney to be American. You know like right. They didn't have thatopportunity, so I get it and I'm not even upset at the opportunity she tok,because I once you understand the publishing industry you're, like heyI'll, take it in a minute because you're trying to get your work outthere and validate your skills tet. This is a very hard space to be in, asas I can't imagine what her life is going to look like, but I think at thispoint she can come back and write another book, but it just wouldprobably not be in the. In the experience of the immigrant and thepublishing, like you said, the publishing houses have to understand.There are a bunch of Ladinos out here who are writing who've, been writingfor years, who they could have picked to elevate that the writing of thisbook order to even approach to write a book of this kind of of this. You know of this nature likewhy give ourselves an opportunity to even put people inthis position in the first place right. It's just like a lack of Ye, and hopefully they start picking up onall of these books that you have out here. I will tell you one thing: I wason a panel which was an amazing opportunity of the Queen's PublicLibrary that they had something ofor Dominican Independence Day and inpublishing in children. The Children's book faith and one of the Penel Listhave written over twenty boucks. If I'm hoping I'm not misquoting her, she gotpublishing eals and it wasn't after her...

...first book, her second book, Her FifthBlook, she was talking an was like almost near the end. She had written somany books and like selfpublished on her own that she started getting theopportunities that I feel like we're, really much old to her, because she wasreally changing the game in many respects. So I kind of want to like put that messageout there. Just because you're not getting a seat at the table. Does itmean you can't go, create your own fucking table like people need tobecome clear on that. You know you hear a lot of Comedians that get on Netflix.They produce their whole show and then sell it to Netflix because they didn'thave the opportunity at the first place like so. Don't don't think that can beyou producing something like don't think you have to be at the mercy ofthe Publishing House. I respect publishing houses. I think there's alot of great opportunities that come with them, but if they're not offeringous seat at the table, you don't want that table. You need to you need tocreate your opportunities. You have one life to live, so make sure you go outthere and do what you want with it. I love that because I think more andmore people are starting to realize like that table wasn't necessarilybuilt for us and it's okay, like yeah, don't have to elevate yourself to betheir table. You can be able and bring other people who look like you alongand like we have to get to a point. What we're we are motivating ourselvesto create the banks to create the corporations to create the businessesthat elevate our stories and who also don't have a diversity, an inclusion department, because they alreadystarted with diversity and inclusion from the beginning, because they arediverse and they are to and their langudo and their languageisrepresenting diversity and their mission is yeah like I believe in that,and I know me and you have got it on a lot of those conversations you know and our private calls, but I think oneof the things that I was always kind of like upset about is that- and this isme speaking about me fifteen years ago, like not knowing what to do not evennot knowing how I wanted to go with my life. I used to think- and I know somany people that still think, like I used to that you had to be with thisskillset or from this college or from this socioeconomic background, to eventry for it guess what your folks, they don't know any better than you do so yeah they have some cushion like theyhave some funds, but it doesn't mean you can't try for it like. It took me along time to figure that out, because once you see the individuals that areout there making these these opportunities for themselves, itdoesn't mean that you don't have the same thing they do. They have tostaying, drive the same motivation some could they have their own unique talent?And I think that's what people forget you forget to incorporate your skillset,which is your talent. You know, I think my friend Victor, who also has beenvery key and a lot of the production of Muddya for making them animations. Hegoes like. I've worked with many individuals and we were Tali was likecongratulating him on the great work he did for the thelate unimation. He goes,but you have this ability to drive your team in such a motivating andcompassionate way. That is ha. Skill sat like he said many entrepreneurslack and I felt like that was such a huge actlay like to cave that to melike that was the biggest award, but I was telling him, but that means youhave that too, and I want and that's the message I wanted to drive home. yougo out there and work with people that...

...are doing the same things. Do you wantto do and have the same drive emission you want to emulate? Don't go workingfor these crummy people that are not going to represent you echnolete you oreven give you an opportunity because that's not where you want to be. That's,that's not it! You know they don't get the plot. I now Wat's Alami, like Isaid you don't want to eat that Gou Wano eatyour stuff, and I think the other thing about that too is is like getting tothat point where we're not taking pennies on the dollar for yea had aanexperience recently with a big corporation that wanted me to come inand speak to the Latinex department in their companyand give them my information for free, and I was like not they first, I was willing to do it.I mentally thought about it, Belo, because I was like Oh. This would be agreat opportunity, however, after that, after I got off that call, I had areally weird feeling in my stomach, W o call it our intuition right, and ittold me you know what read it if we're out here, promoting people having toget paid market rate or higher for our voices for our stories, it's time forthese companies to be held accountable and they have to pay for our voices, nomore giving your stuff away for free we've. Gotten to this point is twothousand, and twenty one life has changed completely. It's time for us toget paid and not be afraid to say no, don't take a penny to avoid a dollarwe're just as valuable and right now, even more so valuable. Our dollars area lot more powerful than people think they are, but not a. You talked about the moneypiece because yeah money is important and I have to admit I've done a lot ofwork for free and in the past, and that's something Istruggle with, and I know you and I have had these conversations whereyou're like Luse, don't do anything for free, no more, like your time isvaluable and it's true, but it took me a long time to get to that point intime to be like. Oh my God like this, is what x amount of time ofwork I did for free and now that I'm charging. For my time, people are like.Oh my God like not only are they taking you more seriously, but u they see whatyou're bringing in. So I'm glad you had that opportunity to show your work. You know yeah, and Isaid no, and sometimes you guys, you say no to something and the doors open,so much larger for the bigger things you know think about the value thatyou're adding to the community. When you tell somebody, no I'm not going to,let you take advantage of my story anymore. Sorry, if you want my story,you pay for it and it's not about money to be greedy. It's about everything inlife has a value to it, even if you don't give it an actual value and theonly way that people value your story and will continue to value our stories-and you know pay for the value in our stories is if we get to appointent as acommunity, we stop taking zero dollars like it. So me to DADS:got Ta go out of the window. Yeaan pay your bills on humility. Yes, I thinkwho was it? Someone had cept this story about when you're, like the people thatget promoted the quicker quicker jobs is not because they're being humbleabout it, is because they're like Oh, I did ABCD. I need to be paid for this.This Ha, this is how it helped your company growt an dollars, and this ishow much time it took me to do that when I started seeing that kind of likeability to advocate for yourself, I was like yeah. I need to be more of a theadvocate or the the leader in asking for Loos's pacheck ins such a good way.You know, because that paysheck needs to go to the Threi kids that are askingfor money every too mane for that air...

BN being the hampted, as is what I was like picking the Arbm he picked,I mean like okay, you coul tell he's my son Hes Stevin. He sends me a link tothis house. That's nine hundred dollars a day, I'm not mad, that the house wasnine hundred dollars a day. I mean, like the Damn House, looked like out ofa commercial, but I was like kind of don't even know how to look for thishe's like Oh, that's easy. I gooled camptons put it in AIRBNB. That was it. These kids are sparter than we arethese days. Yeah Yeah I mean, and one of the things too, I was going to say,like I think it's who wis it Chris Rock or or Kevin Hart. He says you got to beyour own. Youwill have to be Your Own Star Player, Oh yeah, Heaven Heart BeThe star player, be the cheerleader and be the motivator. I think he saydsomething like that to that you got ta every day you wake up, you got to belike you are the best every single day, even if you don't feel like it just belike I am the best. I am all of this and, like affirmations all the way Imean you know, you know me, I believe in all that stuff. Some days I have Hharddays to and it's like. Sometimes you just got to repeat that in yourhead, even when Yeah Yeah, I'm starting to believe in the power of afirmationsreally strongly. I feel like this last year and a half is that Istarted really playing into affirmations because at first I used tosay like yeah, I'm poteful, I I'm very positive about it, but there wassomething when you write it down that you're really sementing the belief thatyou believe in afformation. So I started writing it down more. So thatwas thanks to Denise and thanks to you and the people sharing what they areaffirming in their life, because I feel like that's a skill sat you have tobuild up, for you know what I mean like: That's, not something that you comewith it because you know the world does such a good job at beating you up aboutit. That's a good, a good point and it kindof goes back to we asked you like. How do you describeyour personal life experience? And you said it dreamer. That makes total senseright like yeah. So what I dreamer? No because when Iwas a child, it's pwenty to believe, because I'm just such a blabber mouthnow- and I talk a million words permanent right, like Oh, my God, catcher, funpis like O chatcheck but ow. No, I used to be very quiet and I usedto always be dreaming up. Things like I felt like I wanted my like to be likethe stream white, like Waik, always dreaming about the metnext bigthing to do, or always dreaming about something peaceful and n enjoyafl likethat. So let me ask you a quick question:What does Inpodera Latina mean to you? Oh Man, it means a lot of things. I really do feel that when you are in a place of peace,you're at your mouth, most power because you're so comfortable in yourown skin and to give someone that ability to bethemselves and wherever they are in life and telling them andcongratulating them for being your thought themselves and at East withthemselves. I think that's amazing, because we need more people that feelcomfortable in their own kin and that they're showing that every day of theirlife, I feel like. We don't do that enough. You know wedon't encourage people to be themselves because we're always editing and tryingto make sure people are powerful and cold hearted and like like almost robotic of perfection,but were we're teaching people to embrace who they are. Are you apodcaster and having trouble trying to get an audience to connect to yourpodcast? Well, we have a solution. Join...

...the largest global platform in theworld for Latinas who podcast letting a podcasterscom. Add Your podcast to thedirectory and you'll get a lot more listenership to your podcast for moreinformation, go to Lettina podcasterscom, all right, Losso, we've, Gotento,Laapolet or the power hour, and it's time for us to do our rapid firequestion. So for each one of these questions, TPOWHOUR all right! So for each one of thesequestions, I want you to answer as fast as possible, Jay off at the top of yourhead. Whatever comes to your first and and don't think it don't overthink it,okay, okay, no breaks, no breaks, okay, break all right. What was your favoritemeal growing up, Amungo, coffee or tea coffee? Have you completed anything onyour bucket list? No nonow. Do you have a nickname Luchi? How didyou get that nickname? I was that bad. What anovella did you watch growing up?Oh my God lose Glaritha, and then that was the Nigga, and thatwas my nickname in in school atoy. Who is your favorite sibling? I can't say that they all my favorite, I like them all.They all know how to cook let' put if you had a movie of your life. Whatcartoon character? Would you pick to play your life? Oh, my God, Bas bunny.If you could be fluent in any other language, what language would youchoose? That's Ho! You know I was speaking about language to my husband,because I have a easy ability to pick up languages, but I really want to befluent and Portuguese and Italian. I feel like I understand French, a lotbecause I took it for so many years and what's one thing that surprises youabout life- Oh my God that it keeps on just bringing themistakes full circle forward and telling you you see that mistake wasn'ta mistake. That was a blessing like that's every time that happens, I'mlike God, you did that once again, how could I doubt you well? Lucit has beensuch an awesome pleasure to have you here: Amia Amco. You know that your othank you somuch and tell everybody how they can find out more information on your booksand how they can connect with you sure, okay guys. So this is the time writ itdown. I want you you to go to lose maccom, that's my website! That's whereyou get to see my books and other features as well as animimations andinstagram filters. You can follow me at LOOSEMAC official, which is theinstagram handle and also on facebook, NEWSMAC official you could reach out tome. I you have any questions or want to just chat, I'm down for it, so yea Benito Atukasa all right! Thank youand make sure that you guys pick up some of these books. You guys becauseLusa some really awesome powerful stories and storylines behind thesebooks share them with your cousins, your nephews, your nieces, your babies,Ustias Dosawellas, you never know they might actually connect to it and belike. Oh, my God. I wish I would have heard this story when I was a kid and Ihope that that's what happens with your stories loose is going to be the newasops fables for leting know, Oh, I hope so. Let's claim it thanks for tuning into Inbolra Ladinapodcast, with your host read about Tista, I'm hoping that you got a chanceto fill yourself up with amazing, empowering stories from Ladinas likeyou and I for more information on Ladina podcasters network go to Latinapodcastercom. We also have a directory of over seventy podcast listed theyreall made by Latina and Latin X.

Podcasters, follow us on Instagramfacebook and all your social media platforms and don't forget to rate andsubscribe to this podcast and remember, keep it positive or don't keep it atall.

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