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Empodera Latina
Empodera Latina

Season 3, Episode 3 · 1 year ago

Latina Author Luz Maria Mack Embraces Her Identity Through Children's Books

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

On this week’s episode I am joined by Luz Maria Mack, a bilingual children’s book author with the belief that diverse stories matter. 

Luz was born in Villa Mella, Dominican Republic, and immigrated to the United States as a young child with her family. She comes from a loving and big family that is a recipe for laughter and lots of beautiful memories. Luz earned a Masters' degree in Public Administration from Metropolitan College of New York and works as a healthcare professional in New York City. 

You can find her colorful collection of books on her website https://luzmack.com/ to diversify your babies’ bookshelf! 

A La Megas, me nombre Rita Bautista, and I am the founder of the Latina podcasters network, a platform created to globally amplify the voices of Latinas who podcast. I started my company because I wanted to hear the voices of my community and my people reflected back into my ears. Well, this podcast is dedicated to all of those dreamers and founders who decided that they also wanted to take a chance on themselves and create something for their community. In IMPOIRA, Latina, you'll hear stories from CEOS to social media experts, MOM's, tech company owners and leaders from across the world that are all Latina's here to share their stories with you weekly. Stay tuned. o Lea me. Guys, we're back for an episode of Impodidra Latina, and today I'm so excited to have one of my really great friends, loose, Myria Mac in, author, a mother and an Awesome Badass who is an entrepreneur and continues pushing through every single day. Loose, thank you so much for being here with me. I am honored to have you on. Oh my God, dusty, I'm so honored to be with you and seeing you and all your sadhold on you. That's my girl. Thank you so much. So you guys. Just a quick background. I got a chance to meet loose last year during the pandemic, and we met in the Endia dream accelerator that is hosted by denise solid cos she's a filmmaker and I mean she does just everything that you need. She's like a fairy godmother. and Rina right there, let Nina, let then the seel and you know, one of the great things about being in an accelerator program with Latina's in general, is that you get to connect to people who are really creating waves in in our community, in our culture and doing some amazing things. And I got a chance to connect with loose, and loose has been basically my soul sister from the moment I met her. So I'm really excited for her to be here a little nervous because, you know, she's like my sister and family and it's always just so exciting to hear and let people talk about the amazing works that they're doing. So, loose, I'm really happy to have you here. Oh my God, I don't notice mail. I love it. So, loose, you're really proud of being where you're from. So why don't you tell us a little bit about your background, like where were you born and how did you get here? Yes, so I was born in BM A, yeah, Boa Megana, a beautiful island also known as the Minigan Republic. WHOO WHOOO. But I'm very much a dominic New York, which means you're born in the island for raise in New York City, from Washington Heights, like talk about like Bam, Bam, Bam Bam, like I hit all the corners. So a lot of my culture and upbringing was like really trying my best, hardest, like my cultural of bringing from the Midigy Republic and being here, like, you know, maybe I can need the yeah, like very manicing from there, but very Washington Heights from here. And I grew up with a lot of individuals and hit my age that had the same experience. So it was very much something I grew up learning and loving. But at when I was little, at first I was like wow, this sucks, like you don't feel so special right, but you learn to embrace it when you get older and you love it. What was that one thing that helped you really like embrace being Dominican. Your Weeken Orm y'all. Go to...

...the cover. Another, he said, the MINICK IN YORK. Yeah, AND YORK. That's the thing. No socks, wearing sneakers, walking up dikemn be like oh in then in my phone go, you know, like going up and eating, going to the best restaurants, and when music comes out loud, you know it summer in New York when you know you hear bad bunny right now, because that's the thing. or I've in Buda playing loud and you just dance on the streets like there's no problem with that. So that's how you know you're from New York and happen to be Dominican. So a little mofungle, somebotch at that, and the streets. Personally, I can also feel that statement that you said, media giving me a yeah, I think a lot of the people that are listening to have either experienced that or going through that now, and it's so it's so funny because I remember that movie from that India, my Eya, and it never realize that it was going to be pivotal, right or so important to like explain that experience. Right of how do we create that bridge between being from another country or having cultural connection to another country and then being here. Every time you walk outside of Your House you're experiencing something completely different, verses what you feel on the inside. You've been able to take that and embrace it and now almost molded into what you're doing for your profession and how you're able to translate that into your books. No, I was gonna say it's hard because when you're growing up, like you learned to edit yourself, and I'll use that work because we use that. You used it previously. Like you're kind of scared to show your true self and a lot of like realms, like the professional realm, that demia realm, all these realms, because people, I don't know what happens, but like when you get older, there's a sense of like, you know, you get a little you gotta like, Oh, I can't do this, I can't do that, like you just you just you're playing double Dutch. You don't know when you're going to jump in, but you know you can't be yourself when you jump it. You have to be like on your P's and q's. But then I started noticing individuals that I respected the most and I learned a lot from. They were themselves a hundred percent, like they enjoyed it. They welcome you to be yourself. So that's what kind of like triggered me to say, like hey, like, there's only one of me and I have to you know, people have to love me or or leave me as I am. So on the pivotal moment for me was my kids, because I think they were struggling to identify who they are. I still think they're going to go through that invite because no matter how much as a parent, you try to coach them and help them, they always go through these phases, right. So seeing my kids go through that kind of like kind of jump start something and me saying like who am I as a mom? Who am I as a person, and trying to helping them to kind of and see that and like love it as well. How many kids do you have? Oh my God, I have three. Oh my God, just have one, but I bet, Yancy, you know it's very expensive, I mean, but you know, one day you see those people being like I mommy, Mommy, B me, like you love it, but when they start asking for Jordan's and trips around the world and, like my son asked me like, mom, can we rent an Airbnbat to the Hampton's? Oh my God, these this Kild is asking for our house in the Hampton's and I'm looking at him like I don't got no Hampton money, not yet, but yet it's coming. Speaking of not yet, but it's coming. What inspired you to start writing? What inspired you to be like, you know what I gotta I gotta talk to these kids, I gotta give them a little bit of this suss on that I have. I have to like figure out how to animate this. Like how did you get that inspiration? Oh Wow, it really honestly, I really came from a lot of pain, and I'm not going to say it was all roses. This shit is not for the weak at heart and I, and you know that because we've had these conversations, because when you have your kids, you relive a lot of your pain, and I have to be very brutal about that. And it came. It came like in such a funny way. My ten year old just release her book, The...

...cheesy story that you saw, and I was so proud of she. When she was little, she asked me if she could die her hair blond and she just didn't like how she looked. She didn't like her hair texture. She just she was struggling so bad. I remember I had a painting of an angel that my grandmother they Heo a Mano, and that's like a big thing when people make things in our country, like we have to like almost like santify it and glorify it. Like the angel was supposed to be like looking over the house, but the angel was white blond hair and it just like like I remember just looking at the angel and almost like discussed, not because it symbolizes anything bad, because here am I trying to tell a little girl who's like three or four at the time, Love Yourself, you have beautiful hair. And then I started looking at everything critically. You know, the children's books that were out there. There were barely any kids that look like her or represented our families. Then I have these paint that like is that being Buddha? It Chamano, they say on him, and then, like a lot of her family is a variety of shades, but she just felt so different. It just made me think about my own insecurity when I was young and like it spoke a lot to me. But I think the biggest struggle was when I dropped her off to she was going to this private nursery and it really hit home when I thought her play were her three little friends. Her three little friends look like sisters. They're not sisters, they're just, you know, they're friends. And they all looked alike right. They all had like lighter hair, later eyes, white skin, and I could see chloe doing this to her hair like she's like really really morning to look like them. And she had her cute little, I think it was kind of Andre Sir, little draft to match her friend. But she just felt like she stuck out so much and she was just like, mom, I really want to have blond hair. That was it. That pain like really stuck out there. So I was really like this Straw. I talked to her teacher about what can I do, like and and the school itself is a beautiful school. They try to talk about loving the color you're in in such a pod of way with food. They took like chocolate, fudge, Vanilla and all these things and have the kids taste is saying how yummy and how our skin tones are just like food, like we're all yummy and our delicious way. It was so funny and and and talk about like talk about like what a simple way to talk about diversity with colors of food that were like creams all the way to real chocolate. But then she talked to me about telling stories about my own family or about leaders that we love, and that's what inspire me to tell my my my childhood story. And when I was doing that, I took it a step further and decided to just write a book about it. But I had no clue how to write a book. Never done it before. Needless to say, I don't know any writers like in my network of family and friends than ever written a book. So I was like, okay, I'm going to write a book, but I was really saying it then. I know that, without knowing anything, and that's how it came about. That's pretty powerful because for a lot of lettinas in this country in general, like a lot of us, didn't have that role model figure to say, okay, I can be a writer, I can be an author, I could be, I mean, a podcast network owner, right like I can. I don't have anybody to model that off of. But the end of the day, that audacity is so important and it's so awesome that you are almost like self motivated to do these kind of things. And now that's translated into your daughter, who now she can look up to you and be like, oh well, my mom was an author, is no big deal, like I can just I just write a...

...book at ten, it's not a big deal. But like you're you know, like you've paved these ways for people who naturally wouldn't have, excuse me, naturally wouldn't have that mentor to do those kinds of things. And sometimes people have to do the hard things in order for a new generation of people to come through that, that difficult time, you know, that difficult base. So how do you motivate yourself in those times that you're creating and you're you're basically like breaking the concrete? How do you motivate yourself to get up and break the concrete? It was weird because, honestly, I wasn't doing it for any money, I wasn't doing it for thinking this was going to become anything of it. I did it for, you know, those little eyes that when she saw the boat, she shared it at her school. And Mind You, my my daughter, goes to a pretty BADASS school. Would like a lot of already selfmade individuals like authors, people that own a lot of like amazing things, and she was just so proud. She's like my mom is going to come and do an author but like she was like selling it, and I think that's when motivated me. It came from somewhere, but it was honestly pure, pure love of my child. Right now, she doesn't think I'm pretty awesome right, but that's a different story. So let's keep it one hundred percent real. But when she was in kindergarten, I was like I was it. I was better than spice bread to her. But that translated into me actually being like, Oh my God, I am this author, like her seeing me like that, and then I decided that I had more stories to do or or more stories to share. But it was that. It was like how can I motivate my kids? And now I'm writing like almost out of habit because I love it. But I wouldn't have discovered that if I wouldn't have dared myself. You know what I mean? HMM. So, do you still struggle with imposter syndrome, because it sounds like, you know, you didn't believe that you're an author until it came out of you. But this a his so, yes, that and throw the Luna Right. You're almost like this constant battle with this person on the inside of who you really are, and then like Oh, it's really happening, right. So do you still battle with impostor syndrome? Yeah, I really do. I think it was like in a conversation with the knee. I'm like, I'm an author. I said it, but, like I said, it almost surprisingly like Oh, she lucy already wrote like five books, what are you talking about? And I'm like no, no, but like listen to what I'm saying, like like I used to say I dabbled in writing, but I had no idea. I like claiming it. It's it was like one of the biggest steps in my life. The other step that was really amazing to me was realizing that, even though I'm an author, I wanted to produce beautiful content, as animations, and I didn't think I had that in me. I still want to animate and possibly go into producing more work, but it had a start from somewhere, like you have to start doing like the first step, like and I started with something as simple as writing things down in a paper. But, like I there were times I didn't think it was good. There were times I still didn't believe I was doing this, but when I did it and I saw a finished product, regardless of how people felt, I was like, Oh my God, that's me, like this is all of me, not you know, this is pure me, this is an area of me, like and I kept loving each side of me. In a weird way, I feel like I've become more confident and love myself more because I was able to dare and push myself more. And there's no you know, there's a lot of haters out there and a lot of people that was stay negative things when someone's trying to do something good. But I didn't care because I was like, I'm finally living my moment and discovering my truth. Love that and discovering your truth. You've been able to create how many books at this point?...

Oh my God, so we're stepping into number eight. See Theo Scieta. It's really nine, because I really helped my daughter. So I had a I have to kind of say I kind of CO produced her book, although she says no, it was only her. My daughter illustrated it and she was the writer of it, but I did help with the edits and a lot of the art that worked as she did. So I helped her look that things a little critically. So she's really excited about that's awesome. So what are the names of some of the books that are out there right now? So right now one of the most famous projects is the MIGHTIA project. What I call is becking a mighty a Little Maria, mighty Ana Supa. I do that that my real super helper mightia the SCOODAS, while Maria discovers her dance. There's animations tied into those books. They're all bilingual and there's instagram filter so kids could enjoy it and multiple ways. And the last book of Maria was published through Dominican Writers Association. was just an amazing platform for anyone who's interested in becoming a writer. They do give and provide a lot of resources. Another book that I did was Natalie the brave and it was recently featured in New York cares here in New York City, which to me it was like, Oh my God, like I was I think I was telling the need something funny about it, because I was like, Oh my God, I presented to sponsor company my book and they like this for like woman's Woman's month. I was like I never, I never, I never thought, you know, it would get that recognition. And when I vote it last year, when I first joined Da, I was like this book is special and I felt something special about the book. But to hear a company say, no, this book is really special and it's going to represent this our community, I was like it happened, like I felt like I manifested that opportunity. M and some of my other books, when is inspired by my son, is called let's brush, brushbrush our teap together. He takes brushing his teeth, and the elephant family parade, because it's like the themes are all like related to your family, like you're getting inspiration from your family, which is pretty cool. Yeah, and if they ever feel like I don't love them, they could just look at the collections of books. Like the only book that it's not really about my family would all with all honesty, is it sort of it starts with you, because that that was a song inspired by something that I watched in the news that was really sad and it was like that shooting in that club in Florida and they get a little a lot of gay people and I think I was inspired by one of the new stories on that thing that happened. I was really traumatic. was that what would make a child pick up a gun and decide he hate pepe, hate people, hates people so much that he wanted to kill them. So it was that kind of like we claiming our power and trying to tell kids like you know, you're powerful and you have a lot of love to give. Am like you know, and there's people out there that don't know you and love you. So I get emotional when I think about it because my we have loved ones that are gay and we would hate for them to get go through any hate crime. I think one of the things about our community and our culture in general is we need to do better at accepting gayness as as something more natural versus it being something that changes a person altogether. Like if we get to that point where we all just accept each other, like those things don't really matter because it's not like we're sitting there in their bedrooms with them. People should just allow people to do whatever they please and stop that hate for others, just because it's probably just something that they...

...don't understand. Yeah, I mean I remember that shooting in Orlando was so horrible, it was so impactful. It impact in me like for a whole month, like I remembered like crying about it and it and you could like, and all honesty, I didn't know anyone personally that died there, but it was like enough to shake me to the core to be like wow, like this is the true world we're coming to that if we don't manage our emotions or feelings or help kids. You know, there was a saying when that shooting happen like back in the day, you cared about your children and the children was that were down the block and the society that were living in. We only care about our children and forget the kids down the block because they're not a responsibility. I feel like I want to take it back to that mentality, like yeah, there's some kids there that aren't being taken care of, that they're still our responsibility. There are still our problem, and I don't want to use the word problem, but if that's how others see it, like they have the right to feel loved by others, to buy their teachers, by their community and inspire. So we need I feel like there's a lot of ways to do better and I hope and I pray that I have those opportunities. I could show that. That's pretty powerful. I mean, how do you think I remember growing up as kids? Right, we could go outside and play and, like most kids, didn't want to stay inside. And most of these kids nowadays, like you don't see kids on the street like you used to. Like I remember being out there a one the grid, Alamam, okay, they call it. Yeah, yes, Dam pop, but I could. I remember, like you know, how how they'll be like, Oh, don't send your child without an adult outside. Now, my mom would send all of us and be like go to the park and don't come back to looks like eight or nine o'clock. I A sorry Mommy, if you're listening to this, but you did say that Shit. Yeah, so we were legs just getting dirty, or me sitting, like how play no more what you food before watching TV. But, like you know, you know, there are a lot of people didn't have luxuries of babysitting or after school programs and things like that. So us being outside and playing with each other was our, you know, our source of entertainment. Yeah, it was our facebook and our instagram back that that was our social. Yeah, that was tick Tock, or like I sold my kids. That was feat back the original take. See as Commodio, city, a city, if you see levels, is set on podcastering, dependient, they say, years to be and the podcast Consantamente Por cannot. The NEMOSUNA community, that's conkain connect that out a thin la solution. Latina podcasters network, the that connects young, a communy that the podcasters eat, Ambientila to Propia, bahina and a directoriums Grande, the Latina podcasters in and Mundo, themos La Plataformaqet, CONNECTA COMA DECIDENTA podcasters. No, it's been as must be city Latina podcasters punt to compare arte, La plataformer musk grande demondo. The podcasters amplify candolas bosses. The Latin has well, you know what I was going to ask you, a question, like would have been some of the challenges that you faced during, I would say, your production of your books or like creating, like what are some things that you are like man that that was a challenge or like that was difficult to face. I feel like each balk and moment of creation was a challenge, because there you know, I, like I, for the most part I had been a self published author. So raising the money, getting the artist to work with me on the projects and then paying for editing, paying for all these additional things have been challenged. Getting Beta readers, getting Beta readers that understood...

...the message. I think one of the most challenging things it was with my first book. I didn't understand any of that process, you know, because I just did it on my own for my child right. But once you get better, you learn other skill sets that come along with it, you know, and I remember there was this one reader that told me they didn't get it or they didn't get why I needed to be bilingual, and it kind of hurts to my core because they didn't say anything wrong, you know, they just stated something that they didn't relate to. But it also made me realize how much work we had to do to show how there's a lot of cultures here that are represented and there's a lot of story lines that are not being accepted. I think America's very much a onesided story, and I say America because that's, you know, in publishing country and the publishing industry. We're still a onesided story. So they keep saying it's the American story, but that's not true. You know, like there's not capturing all of us and we're America's pretty much a melting pot that is still not represented as much. We saw that with that book American dirt. I don't know if everybody remembers that last year. That was a big yeah, it was such a horrible controversy because I'm as a person who believes in the freedom of speech, I felt bad for the woman because of her it was her work, right, essentially, at the end of the day, she was kind of put in a position where she got a deal. She got a book deal to write a book, and I'm pretty sure any one of us, if we are at the height of our creative journey, get a deal and that deal looks great, you don't know what the backlash is going to be and they kind of used her. I wouldn't say they used her, but it was a pawn move. Right. Yeah, that's supposed to be talking about the immigrants journey to the US and you let somebody who has never experienced that, has never has no connection to it other than the fact that she for their name to it. Right, right, let's get to the nitty get it pretty that even the experience of changing your name to be American, to be you know, like like I understand that they're not really speaking of that, that that journey, like they didn't journey to be American, you know, like they didn't have that opportunity. So I get it and I'm not even upset at the opportunity sheet took, because I once you understand the publishing industry, you're like Hey, I'll take it in a minute, because you're trying to get your work out there and validate your skills. That this is a very hard space to be in as as I can't imagine what her life is going to look like, but I think at this point she can come back and write another book, but it just would probably not be in the in the experience of the immigrant and the publishing, like you said, the the the publishing houses have to understand there are a bunch of Atino's out here who are writing, who've been writing for years. So they could have picked to elevate that the writing of this book order to even approach to write a book of this kind of this, you know, of this nature, like why give ourselves an opportunity to even put people in this position in the first place. Right it's just like a lack of research and hopefully they start picking up on all of these books that you have out here. I will tell you one thing. I was on a panel which was an amazing opportunity for Queens Public Library that they had something for the miniican Independence Day and in publishing, in children, the children's books, face and one of the pen and list have written over twenty books. If I'm hoping I'm not miss quoting her,...

...she got publishing feels and it wasn't after her first book, her second book, her fifth book she was talking. It was like almost near the end she had written so many books and like self published on her own, that she started getting the opportunities that I feel like we're really much old to her, because she was really changing the game and many respects. So I kind of want to like put that message out there. Just because you're not getting a seat at the table doesn't mean you can't go create your own fucking table. Like people need to become clear on that. You know, you hear a lot of Comedians that get on Netflix. They produced their whole show and then sell it to Netflix because they didn't have the opportunity at the first place. Like. So don't don't think that can be you producing something like don't think you have to be at the mercy of a publishing house. I respect publishing houses. I think there's a lot of great opportunities that come with them, but if they're not offering you a seat at the table, you don't want that table. You need to you need to create your opportunities. You have one life to live, so make sure you go out there and do what you want with it. I love that because I think more and more people are starting to realize, like, that table wasn't necessarily built for us, and it's okay, like, yeah, don't have to elevate yourself to be their table. You can do teoble and bring other people who look like you along and like we have to get to a point where we're we are motivating ourselves to create the banks, to create the corporations, to create the businesses that elevate our stories and who also don't have a diversity and inclusion department because they already started with diversity and inclusion from the beginning, because they are diverse and they are include and their language is representing diversity and their mission is yeah, like I believe in that, and I know me and you have gotten on a lot of those conversations, you know, and our private calls. But I think one of the things that I was always kind of like upset about is that, and this is me speaking about me fifteen years ago, like not knowing what to do, not even not knowing how I wanted to go with my life. I used to think, and I know so many people that still think like I used to, that you had to be with this skill set or from this college or from this socioeconomic background to even try for it. Guess what, your folks, they don't know any better than you do. So, yeah, they have some cushion, like they have some funds, but it doesn't mean you can't try for it. Like it took me a long time to figure that out, because once you see the individuals that are out there making these are these opportunity unities for themselves, it doesn't mean that you don't have the same thing they do. They have to say, drive the same motivation. Some could. They have their own unique talent, and I think that's what people forget. You forget to incorporate your skill set, which is your talent. You know, I think my friend Victor, who also has been very key in a lot of the production of Maria for making them animations. He goes like I've worked with many individuals and we were I was like congratulating him on the great work he differently. The Ladies Hadimation, he goes, but you have this ability to drive your team and such a motivating and compassionate way. That is a skill set, like he said, many entrepreneurs black and I felt like that was such a huge accolade, like to have that to me like that was the biggest award. But I was telling him, but that means you have that too, and I want and that's the message I wanted to drive home. you go out there and work with people that are doing the same things you want...

...to do and have the same drive emission you want to emulate. Don't go working for these crummy people that are not going to represent you or acknowledge you or even give you an opportunity, because that's not where you want to be. That's that's not it. You know, they don't got the blood that always salaby. Like I said, you don't want to eat that you want to teach your stuff, and I think the other thing about that too, is is like getting to that point where we're not taking pennies on the dollar. For me, at an experience recently with a big corporation that wanted me to come in and speak to the Latin x department in their company and give them my information for free, and I was like, noting, first I was willing to do it. I mentally thought about it, though, because I was like, Oh, this would be a great opportunity. However, after that, after I got off that call, I had a really weird feeling in my stomach. Call it our intuition, right, and it told me, you know what, Rida, if we're out here promoting people having to get paid market rate or hire for our voices, for our stories, it's time for these companies to be held accountable and they have to pay for our voices. No more giving your stuff away for free. We've gotten to this point. It's two thousand and twenty one. Life has changed completely. It's time for us to get paid and not be afraid to say no. Don't take a penny to avoid a dollar. We're just as valuable and right now even more so valuable. Our dollars are a lot more powerful than people think they are, especially you talked about the money piece, because, yeah, money is important and and I have to admit, I've done a lot of work for free and in the past, and that's something I struggle with and I know you and I have had these conversations where you're like, loose, don't do anything for free. No more like your time is valuable, and it's true, but it took me a long time to get to that point in time to be like, Oh my God, I this is what x amount of time of work I did for free, and now that I'm charging for my time, people are like, oh my God, like not only are they taking you more seriously, but you they see what you're bringing in. So I'm glad you had that opportunity to show your worth, you know. Yeah, and I said No. And sometimes you guys, you say no to something and the doors open so much larger for the bigger things. You know, think about the value that you're adding to the community when you tell somebody no. I'm not going to let you take advantage of my story anymore. Sorry. If you want my story, you pay for it. And it's not about money to be greedy. It's about everything in life has a value to it, even if you don't give it an actual value. And the only way that people value your story and will continue to value our stories and, you know, pay for the value in our stories, is if we get to a point that, as a community, we stop taking zero dollars, like as I will meet Dod's got to go out of the window because, yeah, and pay your bills on humility. Yes, I think. Who Was it? Someone had set this story about? When you're like, the people that get promoted the quicker quicker at jobs is not because is they're being humble about it, it's because they're like, ah, I did a BCD, I need to be paid for this, this, this is how it helped your company grow in dollars, and this is how much time it took me to do that. When I started seeing that kind of like ability to advocate for yourself, I was like, yeah, I need to be more of a the advocate or the the leader in asking for loose his paycheck. It's such a good way, you know, because that paycheck needs to go to the race kids that are asking for money every two...

...min he for that airbnb in the Hantons. Is What I was like, picking the Air Bam he picked. I mean like, okay, you could tell he's my son. He's Steven. He sends me a link to this house. That's nine hundred dollars a day. I'm not mad that the house is nine hundred dollars a day. I mean like the Damn House looked like out of a commercial. But I was like, how did you even know how to look for this? He's like, oh, that's easy. I googled Hampton's, put it in air BMB. That was it. His kids are smarter than we are these days. Yeah, yeah, I mean, and one of the things too. I was going to say, like I think it's who is it? Chris Rock or Kevin Hard? He says you got to be your own. You'll have to be your own star player. Oh yeah, even hard be the star player, be the cheerleader and be the motivator. I think he says something like that. To that you gotta every day you wake up, you got to be like you are the best every single day, even if you don't feel like it. Just be like I am the best, I am all of this and like affirmations all the way. I mean I you know, you know me. I believe in all that stuff. Some days, I have had hard days too, and it's like sometimes you just got to repeat that in your head, even when, yeah, yeah, yeah, I'm starting to believe in the power of affirmations really strongly. I feel like this last year and a half is that I started really playing into affirmations, because at first I used to say like yeah, I'm hopefully, I'm very positive about it, but there was something when you write it down that you're really cementing the belief that you believe in affirmation. So I started writing it down more. So that was thanks to Denise and thanks to you and the people sharing what they are affirming in their life, because I feel like that's a skill set you have to build up, for you know what I mean, like that's not something that you come with it because you know the world does such a good job at beating you up about it. That's a good the good point and it kind of goes back to we asked you like how do you describe your personal life experience, and you said it dreamer. That makes total sense right, like yeah, so what I dreamer? No, because when I was a child. It's funny to believe because I'm just such a blobber mouth now and I talk a million words per minute right, like, Oh my God, catch your fund these like and Chudge, but do not. I used to be very quiet and I used to always be dreaming up things, like I felt like I wanted my life to be like this dream white like quality, always dreaming about the next big thing to do or always dreaming about something peaceful and enjoyful like that. So let me ask you a quick question. What does in Bodera Latina mean to you? Oh Man, it means a lot of things. I really do feel that when you're the place of peace, you're at your mouth most power because you're so comfortable in your own skin. and to give someone that ability to be themselves and and wherever they are in life, and and telling them and congratulating them for being your thoughts themselves and at peace with themselves, I think that's amazing, because we need more people that feel comfortable in their own skin and they're showing that every day of their life. I feel like we don't do that enough, you know, we don't encourage people to be themselves because we're always editing and trying to make sure people are powerful and coldhearted and like like almost robotic of perfection. But we're at we're teaching people to embrace with they are. Are you a podcaster and having trouble trying to get an audience to connect to your podcast? Well, we have a solution. Join the largest global platform in the world for Lettin us who podcast,...

Lettina podcasterscom. Add Your podcast to the directory and you'll get a lot more listenership to your podcast. For more information, go to let Theina podcasterscom. All right, loose. So we've gotten to Luo a little bullet or the power hour, and it's time for us to do our rapid fire questions. So for each one of these questions, bring it baby power hour. All right. So for each one of these questions I want you to answer as fast as possible. Day Off, at the top of your head, whatever comes to your first and and don't think it. Don't don't overthink it. Okay, okay, no breaks, no brakes. Okay, no breaks. All right. What was your favorite meal growing up? Among goo coffee or tea coffee? Have you completed anything on your bucket list? No, no, now do you have a nickname? Lucchi. How did you get that nickname? I was that bad. What the Novella did you watch growing up? Oh my God, lose, Gladya did then that was a Nigga and that was my nickname is in school. Who is your favorite sibling? Oh, I can't say that. They all my favorite. I like them all. They don't know how to cook. Let's put if you had a movie of Your Life, what cartoon character would you pick to play your life? Oh my God, bus bunny. If you could be fluent in any other language, what language would you choose? That's how you know. I was speaking about language to my husband, because I have a easy ability to pick up languages, but I really want to be fluent in Portuguese and Italian. I feel like I understand French a lot because I took it for so many years. And what's one thing that surprises you about life? Oh my God, that it keeps on just bringing the mistakes full circle forward and telling you see, the mistake wasn't a mistake, that was a blessing like that's every time that happens I'm like, God, you did that once again. How can I doubt you? Well, loose, it has been such an awesome pleasure to have you here on Mega. See Em boom, blessed are they all? Gonthio, got the GETTO Mucho. You know that you're my girl. Oh, thank you so much, and tell everybody how they can find out more information on your books and how they can connect with you. Sure, okay, guys, so this is the time bright it down. I want you to go to lose maccom. That's my website. That's where you get to see my bus and other features, as well as animations and instagram filters, and you can follow me at lose MAC official, which is the instagram handle, and also on facebook, loose MAC official. You could reach out to me if you have any questions or want to just chat. I'm down for it. Soy in Benio ACUKASA. All right, thank you, and make sure that you guys pick up some of these books, you guys, because loose has some really awesome, powerful stories and story lines behind these books. Share them with your cousin's, your nephew's, your nieces, your babies, who se us who's Alwailas you never know, they might actually connect to it and be like, Oh my God, I wish I would have heard this story when I was a kid, and I hope that that's what happens with your stories. Loose is going to be the new astops fables for Lettina. Oh, I hope so. Let's claim it. Thanks for tuning in to and pod. That a Latina podcast with your host, read Aboutista. I'm hoping that you got a chance to fill yourself up with amazing, empowering stories from Latina's like you and I. For more information on Latina podcasters network, go to Latina podcasterscom. We also have a directory of over seventy podcast listed there, all made by Latina and Latin X podcasters. Follow...

...us on Instagram, facebook and all your social media platforms, and don't forget to rate and subscribe to this podcast. And remember, keep it positive, or don't keep it at all.

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