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Empodera Latina
Empodera Latina

Season 1, Episode · 2 years ago

How to be Brave with Rubia Garcia

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Rubia Garcia, Teacher, Activist and Social Media Impactor joins me to talk about how one post changed her life. We dive into the deep conversation about being brave and moments of impact. Follow Rubia Garcia on social media platforms: Facebook: @Rubia Garcia Instagram: @nolarubiagarcia Twitter: @NolaRubiaGarcia Website: RubiaGarcia.com This podcast is dedicate to all my empowerment circle of supporters and patrons who are loyal followers and support this podcast. For more information on becoming part of the goddesses, visit: https://www.patreon.com/Empowermentandallthat --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rita-bautista/message

You're listening to empowerment and all that podcast, your favorite podcast for women's empowerment, hosted by read Aboutista. It's time to be reminded of the authority of your inner goddess and elevate the power within. Are you ready? Hey, guys, welcome back to another episode of empowerment and all that, your favorite podcast for female empowerment. I'm your host, read about Tista, and I'm super excited about my episode today with Miss Movie. I got to see it. Will be talking about how to be brave and all these amazing things that this woman is doing in her community. You, guys. I just want to tell you all that. Thank you to every single person out there who's been listening. Because of you all, I've been able to reach one five hundred plus downloads in less than three four months, and you guys have been absolutely fabulous. So you guys. I wanted to give you a quick little update. I'm actually going to be recording from here on out, or releasing episodes once every two weeks, and I'm moving it to Thursday mornings versus the Wednesday mornings. I've come across a couple of awesome projects that I couldn't say no to and although the podcast is my heart and my baby, I need to take a little bit of a step back. I'm not going to end this season yet, which which is awesome. I'll continue going as long as I can and hopefully we'll be able to record at least another eight to ten episodes before I end season one. So, to all those amazing supporters out there, you guys, thank you so very much for tuning in every week. I do apologize for the inconvenience for all of those people who continue to support me regularly, but I promise you the content is just going to get better. All right. So now shifting gears, you guys, today I have teacher, activist and social media impact or groove. Yea, I got to see us. Who's joining me today? Who Yet? Thank you so very much for agreeing to be on the show. Oh No, man, it's absolutely my pleasure. We go way back to this is super personal and really great to see women coming the powerful, women in power. Women absolutely, you know, it seems like that's the best theme that is come out of all of this craziness that's been happening over the last couple of years. The fact that you mentioned like women, empowering women. You know, it really has been one of the reasons why this podcast launched and the fact that I continue to reach out to women like yourself that are doing some really fabulous things out there and, you know, I want to bring a voice to the people out there that are listening so that they know there are these women who are remarkable, just like yourself, that are doing, just like, some really amazing things. I want to thank you for doing what you do. Girl, no problem, then, you already know how it is. It's all good. Absolutely, it's a pleasure to be here and be a part of everything and watching you grow. Absolutely I'm here for it all. So I just a little background for everybody WHO's listening. So it will be, and I actually went to middle school together. Shout out to Edna Carcut of cougars Hellos. Okay, exactly, so it will be. I tell me a little bit about like your social interactions when you were in middle school and high school, like what were you about? What really drove you, you know, what were those things that people would be like, man, Nashal r will be over there. Well, when I was I remember Middle School, in high school, I kind of it's funny because it was very diverse back then, but it always felt like I was kind of like the minority, but it didn't really matter. Like in our neighborhood and things like that, like it was very open and welcoming and I never really felt some of the same pressures that other people did. But I definitely remember I because...

I kind of felt to some degree that, you know, I was kind of different than everybody else. I wasn't exactly like hottest thing. I was kind of like the Tom Boy, but I the interactions that I remember having with people was just like everybody. Everybody was just Oh, that's all, that's my girl. I was like okay, all right, that's cool, that's fine. I mean that that's the way you want to identify me, that's fine, but it wasn't necessarily issue. But I definitely remember meeting people from all different walks of life and backgrounds and religions and beliefs and things like that, but it was always like super welcoming and open for me, like it's one of the high school junior years and even elementary was always I was extremely fortunate and I'm extremely blessed of had the the upbringing that I did, even when it got it down to its lowest points. I was extremely blessed to have those interactions because they made me exactly who I am. So I'm shout out to in the car and people like Y'all that. Thank yes, girl, I agree a hundred percent with everything you just said, but what I think is really fascinating is that you use your platform to bring light to so many different things that are going on in the communities that are underrepresented, and the fact that you had this opportunity to really see this growing up, I think is really interesting. But what continues to drive you to bring light to these things? Honestly, I think that it comes down to just a lack of understanding. I'm very open and understanding that people come from various walks of life and because I know kind of like what it's what it feels like to be judged by other people, and I from coming from that perspective and having the friends that I was for to enough to have a at a very young age. It's like, you know, I know that some people only click play sometimes on my videos because of the way that I look, whether it's my actual appearance or the color of my skin, and things like that, and it's not something that I necessarily agree with, but that's just the reality of the world that we're living in, unfortunately. So whatever it is that get you to click play is besides the point, so long as the message is being spread, in the messages being heard, because I genuinely believe that, whether you want to accept the truth or not, your conscience somewhere inside has hurt and once it hears it, it can't ignore it. Will reside in there at some point inside and hopefully, with you gaining experience, then you'll refer back to that in some way, shape former fashion. So I feel like the more knowledge that you put out there, the more facts that you put out there, the more truth, the more empathy and compassion and things like that that you share out with the world, it just it comes back and eventually it'll inact change. So my inspiration and what keeps me going is the hope in the faith that people start to really demonstrate the the empathy that they were born with. We're born with a wider range of emotions and we pick and choose the ones that we choose to really invest inside of. So I hope that more and more people get to see that side of other people and if you can exercise a bit of empathy, then I think that that's the first step in where we need to go in order to see the world that we all shouldn't want to really see for everybody. I mean you hit the nail on the head with that. Empathy is what really if it was at the center of the world, we would all just realize that we are pretty much the same. Absolutely I find you know, it's funny because I one of my biggest things and it was the header of my fan paige, on facebook for the longest time, really cheap little thing that I made like an APP, which is the picture of me, and it's said to find strengthen the struggle or my hope is that somebody sees my page and decides not to give up, because what I found is it's a very universal...

...thing. People want to divide themselves based on their geography, their their profession or their socioeconomic background, their race and their religion, but I can't find one person in the world that, no matter what, cannot relate to the sense of struggle. And it's very similar to a baby. Anybody that's been around a baby and you pretend to cry or whatever. The baby just naturally wants to comfort you, wants to look at you and feel like, oh no, like gives you a kiss or something like that. It's a natural human instinct and emotion to recognize the struggle in somebody else. Struggle is a very universal thing. It's subjective but it's highly relative, and if more people were able to find something at this bare minimum of struggle, if they could find just one thing to re laid upon, and that's the sense of struggle, not necessarily specifics of it, then we would all be in the place. That where we need to go. That through that sense of struggle and recognizing in another that empathy and exercising it Jose. From that perspective, it's a step in the in the right direction. That's what I'm trying to some preach. Girl. I yes, I agree a hundred percent with what you're saying right now. But so, okay, take us back to this moment. You're in your car. I want to say I would believe that's the first place that you recorded, but I'm not a hundred percent sure if that was your first video. But let's just say that scenario is is playing out right here. You're in your car and you're like I need to get this message that I have out. Like what was that fire that was lit inside you that made you press played or made you press record and, on top of that, like publish it on social media. Well, this was after Trayvon Martin. I've been teaching and public education in the same neighborhood that we had sended. I've lived here, born and raised, gone to school, even college right there at University of Holy Cross, and now I'm teaching inside of Algiers Charter and I'm seeing the vast majority of my kids are African American. Now, when I was growing up, because of my upbringing, a lot of the white kids per se wouldn't necessarily be my friends because of my particular family upbringing in the choices that some of my family members have me. So it just naturally I gravitated towards a particular type of culture. But no one's a different type of calling a Manta itself. But now that I'm teaching in New Orleans right and I'm teaching these kids, and even the even what people would deem the bad kids, they're not bad kids. There's no such thing as a bad kid. In particular, I'm teaching Middle School Kids, twelve to fourteen, fifteen age range. Of just get a bad rep and it's not. I know that because I kind of got that every once in a while because I'm trying to be rebellious, but I had really good teachers, Miss Ville, Mr Rett, you know, rock and people that would be honest in at car and be honest and straightforward and just keep it honest and real with me. And I'm looking at these kids and there was an instance that happens right shortly after the Tamir Rice case, the young man, the young black man that was shot down and gunned down in the park and the the instance where this kid was gunned down. I'm driving home and you in New Orleans it goes from bad neighborhood to good neighborhood, bad neighborhood to good neighborhood, just like that in the in the blanket and eye and I'm driving home and I see you. One of my students has is by a COP car. The lights are all out, all these cops are out and I see that and I stopped and I asked what's going on and you totally tell the students that are about that life in the words that are not so this particular student that I'm looking at as I'm driving by at night and I'm looking and I'm like, okay, this is not that student. I'm talking...

...about Pokemon's and Star Wars like take this is not this kid. I am curious to know what the heck is happening. So I pull over and I asked the cops what's going on and they said they fits a description of somebody that just committed an arm robbery. And I said, okay, well, what was the description? They said, you know, mid late s black male, and I'm thinking to myself, that describes ninety percent of the blackmailed population in New Orleans, or the population in New Orleans, but whatever. And then I informed in that they're questioning a minor and things like that. And just to make a long story short, it finally started to hit me. And at this time, this is when all lives matter, black lives matter in this whole battle's coming before right leading up to this. And then I'm sitting home one night and I see on the TV that they're not going to be prosecuting the police officers that shot and killed some but to me or rights within a few seconds. And then when I see that, I don't know what it was, but something hit me, because in my heart I know that all lives matter, but it was an epiphany inside of my head because I finally understood what they were saying in black lives matter. Black lives matter, wasn't saying that all lives don't matter. It's saying that all lives can't matter until black lives matter too and they're included in that conversation and in that cohort. That's when it finally hit me and that's when I said, you know what, I see all this stuff on my timeline, I see all these all lives matter and I understand what you're saying. But at the same point I have these experiences, I have these things within my life of my background and me growing up the way that I did, me being in my classroom, me seeing these things firsthand, that I get it, and now that it's me getting it, I want to share that. I want you to understand this. This is what it's saying. And then also I found it as a moral issue for me because at the end of that first video, I just think we remember saying that I can't go into my classroom and tell these kids that you can be anything that you want to be, but when they step outside of my four walls, it's an entirely different scenario for them, simply because of the way that they look in comparison to me. So I just said screw it and I threw the cars up in the air and I let them fall where they make and that's how it happened. Now, what was the obviously you got pretty big pretty quickly because of that video. So what was the what were you hearing as far as comments are concerned? or I mean wait, when you realize, Oh my God, this is this is going viral, oh my God, when the comments here, I did I was not I was not prepared, because I was never I would really did it only for like the people. I didn't even realize that the video was public. I didn't realize that my post republic at that time because I was only getting on facebook to drop like by that point I had maybe like two thousand followers or something like that. But that's them from me and my writings and things like that in my post and in my selfies, from my journal and just things that I've written out and all those types of things from a completely separate thing and the next thing I knew, I'm getting these notifications and my phone is going dead like every two hours because it's just comment after comment, and the the comments range from Oh my God, who is this? What, I can't even think. What is this? Pog What is it? I'm like, what is a park? Exactly, pawg of excuse my friends, but a fat, Assy girl what? I was like, I didn't even know that was the thing. And then World Star hiphop picked it up, and then don't even read the comments on World Star Hip Hop. Girl, it is bad for your mental health. Every comment there was just like something bbd, and I'm like, I don't even know what these acronyms stand for. Yeah, it was totally inappropriate to to...

...the ones where they're like holy crap, like this completely changes things, because I said in the video that I was just a white lady from New Orleans, and it's the truth. So for for people who are on the brink of feeling like they don't understand or because of race, there's such a difference that it like they don't there's nobody there that can empathize or or truly see where they're coming from. It was it was inspiring and it gave them a little bit hope. So there's a wide range. And then obviously the the violent death threats and all kinds of stuff. So there was a wider range of responses to it. So it just went positive to negative and everything in between. I never even knew stuff like that existed. So crazy, I mean. So it is interesting right, like you are a white woman from New Orleans right in the fact that a lot of people don't understand that cultural makeup when you do go to public school or magnet school in New Orleans, that it is very diverse and you get exposed to all of these cultural backgrounds. I mean there were Hispanic, Puerto Rican, you know, black, white, Arab, we had everything as yeah, are everything, but for someone on the outside looking in and being like why is this white woman telling me my history? Why is this white woman telling me about the injustice, the injustice of the society that I already know and I saves every day? You know, how was that? Oh, absolutely, I'm sure you got the I mean I just looked at some of those stuff. I was like, well, of course I were what people because, you know, I mean even I'm Hispanic and I'm sure there are those moments sometimes where I'm like, well, this person is getting recognition. We've been saying this all along, but you know, how is that experience? How did you oh Yo, when you are getting that backlash? I mean, here's the thing. That's the beautiful part about empathy, is because it empathy allows me and affords me the opportunity to see where they're coming from. I see where your hesitancy is in even believing me. I understand it because I know history. I know every single feeling that you have is absolutely one hundred percent valid, but I can't force you to believe me. When everything comes down to it, I can't force you to see past the history and to see what's going on right now, in the present. All I can do is speak my truth and tell you that I'm coming from a place of empathy and not sympathy. I never once said that I could sympathize with you. I said that I could empathize with you. I will never know what it is like to be a black woman or a black man, or a Hispanic or Latina growing up in New Orleans or anywhere else in the world. I'll never know that and vice versa. I said that I can see where you're coming from, I can understand, maybe not fully, but I can appreciate your struggle. That's where I said and that's always the stance that I've always been. I literally that was one of the things that I said, even in that specific video. Is because of that, like, I can understand, I'll never know what it's like. I'll never know what it's like, but that doesn't remove me of my ability to empathize. And at the end of the day, you look at people throughout history, because I am a historian, people throughout history, they recognize that the bigger pishure is not about race, it's not about any of those societal things that certain people within our government or just our culture tend to put us into in order to get us the conflict with one another, so that way we don't see that we're all being screwed by the same group. They want us to fight amongst each other. I it was never for me. I just I had a message that I felt like I needed to deliver really to the people within my circle, because I wanted to not necessarily draw a line, but I wanted it to be clear as to...

...where I stood and why. Where you chose to fall after that is not my fault and not my problem. I really just didn't care, and I guess that's where the bravery came in, because I feel like that's that's the bravest thing that a person could do, is to own and to step forward and to stand resolute behind their convictions and to again let the cars fall where they may. I'm not here. I'm here to be unapologetically myself, and it comes off sometimes it's arrogance, like how dare this person sit here and try to talk on these things? But in reality it's not arrogance it selflove it's self worth. I know myself. I know where I'm coming from. I know that I mean absolutely nothing thing that I can't speak with a hundred percent understanding from where you're where you're coming from, because I'll never fully know. But at the same point I feel for you, my brother and my sister, honestly, and I'm doing whatever I can't not necessary. I've never once done any of my videos that talk about racial injustice, has towards black people and to talking towards black people, talking at talking down no I've actually addressed specifically people that look exactly like me, because I'm trying to get them to understand, because not everybody that looks like me was afforded the same privileges that I had to experience and see the same things that I did. So I'm trying to get them to really understand. I think it's such a great thing that you have the ability to stand in the place that you do. I mean it's got to be tough. Have you gotten any backlash from your own personal relationships, like your family or personal friends that you in the past were close to but then, when they saw the stance you were taking, had some negative comments or whatever? Because, I mean, you know, obviously what you're saying is true. It's I'll say that it goes both ways, because you have the people that are going to distance themselves, whether they say it or not. You have the people that are going to distance themselves from you because they're like, like I don't want to be a part of it. You know, they're kind of more low key and things like that. was just understandable. I signed up root and you done. You didn't, even though I really technically didn't. But it happens so it's just kind of like up, well, here it is, but then you also on the other side the the if anything's been the hardest thing to deal with in my personal life and even my professional life is the people that actually come in because they're looking for a step up, because they see that now you got millions of followers. Then they're going to sit there and try to come in and try to make a come up off of you, and they're only hanging around you because of what you can do for them and not what you mean to them. So when it comes down to it, it's you have to be more cautious. People come with their own demons just in general, but whenever you come with the social media platform and this age where social media means everything, this some people and there's notoriety and things like that, it comes to a certain point that you really have to be solid and firm and cautious about who you let with in your circle, because not everybody that's in your circle is going to be ready to roll with you when everything comes down to it. You have to be very firm and conscientious of those people that are there, because some people are only going to have your back when everything's said and done, only long enough to stab you in and only until they get what they need from you. So it's it's a double edged sword. I've had, you know, people kind of fall back, understandingly, so no love loss, that's wishes to you type stuff. And then I've had the people that are going to jump on and be like okay, well, can you share this, can you go like my video? Can you come here and do this? Can you do that? And it's like, coming from somebody who never necessarily wanted it and it just kind of happened, that is like well, I mean, I don't even promote myself like I possibly could,...

...and it's like it kind of hurts my feelings because it's like I didn't really mean anything to you before, but now that I'm of some kind of intrinsic value or or monetary value to you or your Egos, then all of a sudden I become relevant to you. So it's been an interesting experience ever since all this begin Oh, maybe two, three years ago. So how do you then go? Let's say you get threezero notifications a day, some people who are writing you, some people who are who are not. How do you go about choosing what to answer to when you feel, obviously, that some people are have those intentions. Like, how do you filter through that? I mean, at this point I can't even go into my DM's because there are literally so many dms that it's I don't even know where to start. I really don't even know where to start. And Then, plus, I'm I'm working as a teacher still, I am still trying to write, I'm still trying to work on my book, I'm still trying to, you know, work on me personally and I'm still trying to be a good friends to those in my circle. I'm still trying to be a mom. I'm still trying to be all these different things. And it's not to say that I don't want to be the I want to be there for every single person that reaches out and reaches out to me that is on on something like Yo, like your post really motivated me. Your Post really inspired me. Thank you so much. And or they just want to talk and things like that. Like I it's torture for me sometimes because I wish that I had like a million of me that could go into my dams and like personally respond to each of these people in a way that I would deem you know, appropriate and things like that, but it doesn't work that way. So I kind of go through my DM sometimes and I look at the ones that you can you can almost tell and you can almost hear their sincerity and their authenticity in there and their message that they need somebody or they they are genuinely thankful and they're consistent. The consistency is the biggest thing, because somebody can send a random message every once in a while, but if somebody is genuinely consistent in showing support and showing love and even being honest, unapologetically honest when you make a mistake or you step out of character, those are the qualities and characteristics that I look for in somebody who's trying to really get in that type of circle with me. All some really good qualities to look for. I think something that's really interesting that you said while you were talking about all this is, you know, this wasn't something that you initially sought out for and it just kind of happened to you. So so it really did. I didn't think that that video was to go viral. I really didn't. So what would you want? The people who see who we I got to see at the social media impactor? What would you want them to take into consideration when they're looking at your social media post or when they're, you know, watching your videos? I want them to see what I wish that everybody would see when they look at another individual. I want them to see obviously, I want them to see strength, but I want them to see me being unapologetically myself in a affording me the opportunity to be that which encompasses every aspect of my personality, my highs, my lows, my in betweens, my moments when I'm a little bit extra, my moments when I'm not fully one hundred percent me. I want them to allow me and afford me the capability of just being human, which is no different than anybody else. And I believe that when it comes down to having such a significant social media following that people they try to tell you what to do. Even the video I posted...

...this evening, a man was telling me to stop yelling, to act like a lady, or whatever the case may be, and I can't stand when somebody tells me to stop acting black or, you know, stop yelling or whatever, as if I'm angry, when it's passion or to stop acting a certain way, as if you can act any other way. There are people that put on shows, but if I am consistently this person, then I deserve a Damn Oscar and I will wait for the nomination for this role that I'm yea, if this is all it acts, I really need that Oscar nomination to come through at any point in time because this is just who I am and I'm unapologetically myself and I firmly believe at this point in my life, like the the right people will always stick around. The right people will understand that you have the right to be who you are. In the right people will stick around. In the wrong people won't, they will excuse themselves from your circle. Naturally, you don't have to necessarily force them out, although toxic people do deserve an expertity. Say That, aget, but yeah, that again. Sorry, no, you're good. Toxic people absolutely do and normal more often than not, they'll probably weed themselves out of their expose themselves. They'll expose themselves in that but it comes down to whether or not you recognize the red flax that are getting, that that that pop up every once in a while, and whether or not you're going to sit there and collect them and wrap yourself in your own ego after you stitch them all together and made some kind of egotistical blanket in order to comfort your own ego and pride, or whether or not you're going to call them out on it. I just it wasn't something that I sought out. It just happened and it just sometimes things just go the way that they go. I just want people to see that, no matter what, there is strength to be found in your struggle and there is purpose within your pain, and one of the biggest strengths that I have is that I'm, like I said, I'm unapologetically myself and you take me for what I am in all of its entirety or you don't. It's cool either way. There's no love lost there, and I'm as savages this is going to sound, I really don't care, because one of the things that I tell my students at the end of the day, one of the things that even Hayes, the subject of my book, used to tell me, is that there's no bunk beds in the casket, baby girl. The only person you have to worry about when you put your head to the pillow at night is yourself in your own conscious so as long as you're living your life and you're happy with yourself, and even if you're not, but you use that as a form and a stepping stone of growth and not regret, then you're in good hands. Can the right people will stick around, the wrong people, they'll find their way out one way or another. That is such a good point to make. I mean I'm pretty sure everyone who's listening right now it's probably nodding their head and being like yes, toxic people, red flags yo, but the snass like stay out of my life, like choose your lane. And I think you've hit on some some amazing points, especially about learning how to be unapologetically yourself and being basically like living in your truth and being yourself and not worrying about the guy who's behind the screen who's telling you, Hey, stop being you're too black, or you're too loud or you're being whoever, and it's like, dude, this is who I am, and you know it's one of the best parts about life is that moment when you finally get to a space where you're like, you know what, this is who I am, and if you don't like me, then f you, and I think it happens when you turn thirty. That's just my own personal perspective, but I think that beautiful that you're sitting here, you're telling these kids this at such a young age, especially children who you know society won't always be fair to them. You know,...

...and or you know sometimes they walk into a room and are already being prejudged and you're like, just be who you are. It is what it is. It's unfortunate because I have to prepare my students, sadly, and it's one of the biggest things I came from my video that I've had to kind of incorporate in a very subtle way of preparing them for the world that's outside of my four walls, the world that doesn't give sex and chances, the world that isn't going to be nice whenever they break things down to you, and sometimes those lessons are going to come hard and they're going to come fast and before you know it, again, like Hayes learned at nineteen. He's just he was just a few short years older than some of the students that I teach in my classroom now, and he learned at such a very fast, quick pace way that the world is unapologetic in its opinion towards you. Why shouldn't you be unapologetic about your contribution to the world? It's when you finally get to that point where you understand and you're comfortable with yourself and you own every aspect of who you are and you love yourself enough to put yourself out there. A lot of people find that type of vulnerability and transparency to be a weakness, but in reality it is the most brave and fearless thing that you could possibly do. Because you're saying that I am not I am not willing to conform to what your norm is. People Laugh at me and they cry jokes because I'm I'm different, but I sit back sometimes and I legit chuckle at least three, at least three chuckles, three solid chuckle. I sit back and I guess solid three chuckles whenever people laugh at me because I'm a little bit different than others, and and I get those three chuckles simply because you're all the same. You want to be accepted so much by society that you're willing to compromise on your character and your integrity and be untrue to who the hell you are simply to be accepted. I'd rather be different than be what's regular. That's what a lot of people don't understand. Is One of the most brave things that you could possibly do. Hmm, let it be what it is. Let it be here. Now you keep talking about Hayes and this potential book you're hinting on. Why don't you tell us a little bit about this, like who's this Guy Hayes? Why was he who? Why was he so influential in your life, and what can we be expecting from you? I keep it's is how God is. I can't help it at this point because I'm literally entrenched in it, and the more that I find out about him and the more that I'm I research about him, is it. I can't help but to bring him up all the daytime, because some of the gems that this man dropped on me as such a young age. He's also one of the reasons why I speak about some of the things that I speak on. I speak from my kids. But Hayes was a black man in one thousand nine hundred and sixty seven black men all his life, obviously, but in one thousand nine hundred and sixty seven. He was prosecuted and accused, with two of his other friends of committing a murder here in New Orleans and all robbery and murder or and he went to jail. He took a plea deal, one to jail for what he thought was going to be ten years and six months, but wind up spending a life sentence or getting sentenced to life and then goal of state penitentiary for a murder that he took no part in, absolutely one hundred percent. Wasn't even in the room outside. But he was a black man in New Orleans and s you know, in the heart of the civil rights movement, when Martin Luther King was still around and all these things are going on. This it's...

...like wow, like somebody like that. My book is mainly on the things that he used to to talk to me all the time, like the no bunk beds in the casket. He told me the the same boiling water that hardens the eggs oftens the potato. It's not your circumstances, it's what you're made of. Like no matter what you go through in life, it doesn't really matter what happens to you. It matters that's your content. It matters what what you have inside and this is a man who is probably the most sweetest, the most infectious personality and laughter, and he was robbed of thirty years of his life in prison. And the only reason why I had the intimate knowledge and the privilege of knowing him was because my father was a criminal defense attorney and the case was brought to him and he's got released. But when he got released he came to live with us. So he lived with us for a few short years before he's sadly was murdered in the same neighborhood that I teach now. And he lived a very, very simple but unapologetic life. But he always told me that your transparency in your your ability to fight and fearlessness and things like that, those things were going to make you an empathetic person. You would have an understanding of the world that not many people would. And he taught me how to love people. He taught me that even the people that have done you really, really wrong, he would say that you don't wish some bad, you don't wish them good, you wish them the light that they deserve and you completely absolve yourself from the the obligation of their faith or the results of their fate and their destiny. It has nothing to do with you. They'll get the light that they deserve either way. It goes so for somebody to go through such turmoil, to have such a bad experience and to be robbed the thirty years unjustly and to still have that much positivity and love and empathy. I don't know how you did it, but that that's to me isn't it's inspiring, it's encouraging and it's like, if this man can do it, I don't see what the Hell I excuses. I can't think of one. Yeah, bigger one at all. So I'd love to hear how much passion you have when you're talking in general, but this when you're talking about this particular your story, and when we had a chance to talk about it the other day, it just sounds like, you know, there's passion and there's anger and frustration, but then there's like passion and something that changes, something in you. And it seems as though the story of of Haze and this book that you're working on really just it light something, something very different in you, and I wanted to tell you that the other day when we were talking about it, and in the way that you're talking about it now. I just I see that there's something about this that really intrigues you and I want you to keep following that because it sounds like it will be something very powerful for you. Absolutely it is like I can get emotional behind it because I'm I feel like sometimes, even in the videos that I've done, that I almost I feel like he's speaking through me, because these are the type of messages that I know that Hayes would appreciate. These are the things that he was telling me of such a young age, and I was made of I was made to tell this story. I was the whole title of the book is existing beyond existence. It is his theory that sometimes the light that we lead, in the choices that we make, when we lead this life, can sometimes drop a pedal up pebble that can create a wave that could potentially change the life in the course of somebody else's life, in the tides of somebody else's life. Maybe that's why I got into education, maybe that's why I speak in my videos and I'm I don't think twice whenever I hit record on my phone, because...

...life lessons like that. The things that I've endured, the things that I've survived, have given me an afforded me the opportunity all of these things. I'm an accumulation of every good thing bad thing that's ever happened, just like we all are. But we make a conscientious choice every single day to pick and choose which emotions. We choose to live in and UNPACK, and I choose more often than not, even though I get in my feelings, but no different anybody else, I choose the unpacking, dwell in the happy moments and the positive things and to know that even when I get down into the depths and I visit them, they're not forever. It's just the moment and just like I survived all the others, I'll survive this and again I just go back to him and them just I just remind myself that I couldn't imagine being in that position for that period of time, knowing that it's just wrong, like you just know what is right and what is wrong, and feeling like wrong was done to me and living that every single day of your life and still, no matter what, choosing to unpack and happiness and love and acceptance and forgiveness. Like I just I find that to be a very rewarding experience and I almost feel like it would be becoming of everything that it has ever saw in me if I did not share his story. So when can we expect for decent movements to start happening on your book? My deadline? Ironically enough, this whole the book on Hayes wasn't necessarily my original thing I was originally going to be. I was originally working on autobiography for three years. I've written a journalmost every day since I was ten, and I shared that one chapter on haze on social media and then shortly after my computer crash, so I lost everything, three years worth of work, and then like two or three weeks later, storm came through destroyed all of my journals. Twenty years worth of journals gone, but that was the only chapter that got say. So, in True Hayes fashion, I decided that it was the it wasn't the story I was meant to tell and if made me focus more into Hayes's story. So I've been working on it literally for like two years now and it's it's been emotional, but I've set the deadline for myself to release the book on December fifteen and then to spend two thousand and twenty going around and sharing this man's story, and not just his story but everything that he believed, everything that was of his content and his message and his whole vibe of existing beyond existence. He exists be beyond his existence in this proof, because otherwise I wouldn't be talking about him. He changed the course of my life and the fact that I'm here even talking about him and mentioning him twenty something years later is proof that this man, whether he knew it or not or was just speaking crap, it really didn't matter. He believed it, but it was true, because he changed the course of my life, he changed my tides. He he gave me that gift and I feel like if people could just pay attention to what he used to call like moments of impact, and people paid attention more to those things, they'd be far more open to the to the fact that you come across moments of impact way more often than you probably care to admit. It's just people are so busy and easily distracted these days that they don't pay attention to the moments. I could potentially change their life. Maybe they're scared too, to be honest. But nonetheless, I drop the book this Summer Fifteen, and my plan is to...

...two thousand and twenty, set up giggs as much as possible, of traveling as much as possible, going to any city to meet and greet, talk about he's talked about this belief, talk about existing beyond existence, talk about moments of impact, talk about positivity, talk about and bring about just a movement of positive vibes all of two thousand and twenty and then potentially run for office at the and its yeas girl, you know I feel about that. So I'm like, do it, do it. It's a fear of mine. I've conquered all the others, so I mean, I figure, why not at this point? Definitely been a fear of mine to run for office and I've hesitated up to this point, but I've also conquered all of my other fears, so this is definitely one that I'm not willing to set to the side. So two thousand and twenty I will be running for office. You heard it here, y'all. She is going to run for office twenty twenty. There's that. You have a very powerful two thousand and twenty and I'm excited to hear about it and continue to get updated about it. And you know, I really I think it's so great that one you're wanting to continue to elevate the story of a man who's no longer here, who changed the course of your life, and it's also almost parallel to what you do for these students every day, because you will live beyond your legacy, even if it's just in your students, who boy, now you gonna make also that I love my kids so much and I see them now. My first group of kids graduated last year and some of them are in college, some of them are serving in the military, some of them still see like you know, working in the stores and you know the wind dixies and the Wal morts and things like that. And you know, the funny thing is is that they, some of them follow me now in social media because they can't because I wasn't playing those things future. But now they write me sometimes or they say something to me, and it's absolutely one hundred percent. It just it. It's very humbling and it's honestly what keeps me. It's when my biggest hold back from from doing more with the social media because I know the power that I have in order to leave the classroom and make money doing those things. But I always told myself that I would do ten years. This is my tenth year and I always told myself that I would only leave if it got to a point where I felt like it was in good hands and also that I felt like I could do more for my kids if I was outside, in a position outside. And I feel like at this point, one of the main things, when it came down to it, of even doing that original video was me telling my kids to live their dreams and they can be anything that they want to be and to find the courage and the the braveries of pursue their their their their beliefs and to stand firm behind what they what they have inside of them and their passions. And then, when it comes down to it, I don't do it myself. I can't go in and be a hypocrite in front of my kids, and trust me, they never neglect to let you know and remind you. But I think that it's it's beautiful that my kids sometimes they they hit me up and they say things like that and it's it's I guess said, it's truly humbling, but it just reminds me as to why I do what I do and why I stayed as long as I did. But I think at this point that there's there's more students that are not necessarily my students that I feel that it's it's my time. I've never felt it more than now than never to share hayes the story, but also to share the bigger picture, that there's even adults that want it and they're hungry for it and they're thirsty for it, but...

...they didn't, they didn't necessarily had like a Miss Garcia, they didn't have a MISGI. So they're they're wanting to understand, they're wanting to empathize, but they haven't yet found the person so really articulated in the way that they can understand it. And if I could bring my approaches from the clashroom and put it on a broader perspective and share it with a broader base, that I feel like I'd be paying hazes gift forward. I don't know any other way to really say it. To be honest. I feel like it's a gift that he bestowed upon me and I feel like it's just something that I should I should share with more people. Well, I think you have a great opportunity and anything that you are going to do is going to reflect in such a large way and I hope nothing but success for you on your journey. And you know I've mentioned this to you last time. If there's anything that I can do to be a part of that or anything that you need, please don't hesitate. I love helping people. From my biggest things personally is making sure that I help people, and sometimes to my own detriment. I have to work out it a little. Oh, it's trust me, I know that, but you know, it's a big it's like, you know, who are we if we cannot help the people who are arounders, of the people who have such amazing messages to give to someone, I mean like the things that you're doing for people in general. Your I saw, actually, what's interesting is I saw a message of this gentleman, and it stuck out in my mind when you obviously I was doing a little bit of background research right before, but the guy was like this is something that we needed. You know, we needed that. We needed you to come out with your voice, and it shows with the amount of people that are so interested in hearing you time, day in and day out, and I'm telling you, I truly believe that you're just going to continue making some awesome waves and you're going to continue impacting people all across the board, including your students. Oh, I could only hope that. I'm affoord of the only hope that I live a. you'll be good, you'll be good. You went to car girl, Hey, man, good, Oh man, second, yes, thirty, second, second to that purple and gold believe in. That's so funny. I mean it's funny. I'm sure people are like what they talking about, but you know, in New Orleans it's the school you went to, it's you know what neighborhood you're from, and it's not that college. It's always about a high school, the Middle School, who your friends are, well, your mom and am yeah, in the big deal is the thing that people just in general. I think that's why I'm a little bit understanding when people kind of judge me based upon my mannerisms or the way that I speak. And I was just kind of chuckle because it's fairly common here at least, and I also find it almost ironic sometimes that people look at people like Harry Conic, for instance, and he has a little bit of a swag to him, but nobody says anything, and I'm like this, is that a gender thing? Like I don't know what it is, but then again I am a little bit right. But I mean, I spent the majority of my life in the hood, in the cutoffs, so I don't necessarily come from the same background is in but there's a different vibe here in New Orleans and we, you mentioned in did our school is very representative of the culture in general and now that I know the history of it, from the French to the sorry, from the French to, you know, the Spanish, to the Germans, to the Irish, to the African influence, to all these different cultures, thirty seven of the s of of the at least the forty eight states that are around can drain into and if it ventually would reach the reach to New Orleans and the port of New Orleans. So you have to understand there's such a diverse culture in New Orleans...

...that people are very people from the outside looking in or just like hold up, this is weird, like I don't understand this, but it's fairly normal here, like it's it's so funny when I traveled to other places and people don't get it, or I open my mouth in a video and things like that, people don't necessarily understand what. People from New Orleans get it because it's it just makes sense. But other people they look and they they there's stereo stereotypical boxes, of which I tell people don't put people in stereotypical boxes because you only got to hurt yourselves by the corners. But whenever you put people in those stereotypical boxes for your own comfort and your own convenience, it confuses the hell out of you. But that's not a for me. That's not my fault or my problem, but it's I'm very fortunate to come from our city and to have that upbringing and to have that diversity in my culture, because, again, all those things led me up to where I am. So I think that the is it's it's just so everything that I can't help but to keep bitch of the haze, everything that haze, or my upbring ringing and things like that brought me up to. I feel like there's there's a purpose behind it, all the ups, the downs, everything it's just all kind of going to fall in place and I know that. But yeah, it's definitely a New Orleans culture. We're definitely very competitive, the high schools on up, but everything about this is very, very different and very unique, very definitely definitely well, before we wrap up, I got one last question for you. So when we end this interview? Oh God, you know it's coming. So what we end this interview? Say we get off the phone all the sudden somebody calls you and says, Pruvia, you just want ten million dollars. What would you do? Oho, Ho, Oh my God. Always joke on my social media that the powers that be don't want to be rich because because they just say you think that I'm unfiltered. Now just imagine the levels of F that I will not hear that point. Honestly, when I when I considered to follow my dad's footsteps and do the type of things that he did for haze and to go to law school and things like that, I always wanted to go into law school and I recently pursued it and it's I wanted to do it mainly because I didn't want, not necessarily, do civil rights law anymore. The months the social media stuff kicked off, I wanted to actually get my law degree for the sole purpose of cross prosecuting corrupt politicians. I'm funny. Anybody? Yeah, anybody that that's what I'm going to dedicate my my tia million dollars to now. I want to, I would get my law degree and dedicate my entire life to to literally prosecuting corrupt politicians, because you swear notes of the Constitution and for as long as America has existed it has always been the upper class versus the the lower class. And when everything's Said and done, William McKinley in the election of one thousand eight hundred and ninety six and that you know, if you burn down the cities, the cities would grow again based up on the strength of the American people out in the West. But if you burn down the people down the West and you burn out the people that are out there, the American people, you burn them and you burn their farms in their existence out of the West and literally the cities would not exist.

Because it's true and it's very indicative of the Times of today. If you burn the bottom ninety, the top one cannot exist. The bottom ninety will exist without the top the top ten. That's top one. I want people to pursue their ends to the best of their ability and what was their their natural right given to them by God the foundations of this country. I want people to be held equally to the rule of law. I want people to equally be looked at and be given due process. I want people to have life liberty and to pursue their happiness to as full as bound. And I am I have gotten really honest to God, sick and tired of the injustices based upon class, based upon race, racial lines, based upon all of these things that have been implemented and allowed to continue through education, through numerous avenues and pipelines. My tendermillion would honestly be geared towards making sure those things are handled and taking care of. Obviously, my instinct is like you know what, I want a house on a car on mack. Kids would be good. I want to build a school. In my mind, those would be those things. But at the forefront of my head I want to make the biggest impact possible, and not just for me or the people most intimately involved with me. I want to make the biggest impact globally and I believe that paying it forward no different than Haz did for me. I believe in paving it forward and saying that if I can impact these people, as one of the reasons why I go by impact or or not social media influencer. I don't want to influence, I want to impact, because impacts lasts longer, influences are fat. I want to impact people, I want to make a difference, and those people who are impacted the way that I was impacted will be continuous. It will be a ripple, it will be a tie, it will be a tsunami that nobody can ignore, they can't evate it. It will bring about the change that this world has been desperately seeking for. And in Dire Nita, if I get ten million dollars, yeah, girl, you best believe I'm changing the world with that one. But in the meantime I'm just going to take my little forty FIVEZERO dollars. I'M gonna do my little thing with what I can in my little social media following and try to impact as many people as possible in the means one would say. I mean and social media followers. You're already globally impacting. Right. So one would say you probably already have your ten million. You just have to manifest it. Yeah, to say I mean I have a movement, my moments. But yes, Oh man. Well, girl, it has been such a pleasure having you on the show today. Why don't you let the listeners know where they can follow you on social media so they can continue to find out more information about you, know, when your book launches and any other things that you have going on, you know, to globally impact the world. Amen. Okay, you can follow me on Facebook, you give type and Rubya Garcia. Are You via Garcia? Spoken remore? or You can follow me on Instagram at Nola in Ola Ruby a Garcia. At I'm up. Go to the website. You can go to a Rubya Garciacom and then any other ways you would like to. That's it. It. Twitter is the same thing, Nola Rubya Garcia. Like I said, facebook, Ruby Garcia. INSTAGRAM is Nola Rubya Garcia, twitter, Nola Rubya Garcia and the Rubya Garciacom, and that would be right. Well, you heard it here, y'all. She is globally impacting. For those of you who already follow her, I know she is amazing messages and she is going to be be dropping this book that we're super excited to anticipate. So you guys,...

...be on the lookout for it and, you know, make sure that every day that you're going out there, try to think about the things that she said today about how we impact and how we can take those moments of impact with us. Thanks for tuning in to empowerment and all that podcast with your host, Riata Futista. Want to help me grow the listener tribe. Make sure to subscribe to this podcast and follow us on instagram and facebook under empowerment and all that, and remember, keep it positive or don't keep it at all.

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