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Empodera Latina
Empodera Latina

Season 1, Episode · 2 years ago

How to be Brave with Rubia Garcia

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Rubia Garcia, Teacher, Activist and Social Media Impactor joins me to talk about how one post changed her life. We dive into the deep conversation about being brave and moments of impact. Follow Rubia Garcia on social media platforms: Facebook: @Rubia Garcia Instagram: @nolarubiagarcia Twitter: @NolaRubiaGarcia Website: RubiaGarcia.com This podcast is dedicate to all my empowerment circle of supporters and patrons who are loyal followers and support this podcast. For more information on becoming part of the goddesses, visit: https://www.patreon.com/Empowermentandallthat --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rita-bautista/message

You are listening to empowerment andall that podcast, your favorite podcast for women's empowerment, hosted by RitaBautisna, it's time to be reminded of the authority of your inner goddess andelevate the power within. Are you ready, Ey guys, welcome back to anotherepisode of empowerment and all that your favorite podcast for femaleempowerment? I'm your host read about Tista and I'm super excited about myepisode today with Miss Ruby. I got to see it we'll be talking about how to bebrave and all these amazing things that this woman is doing in her community.You guys, I just want to tell you all that thank you to every single personout there who's been listening because of you all. I've been able to reachfifteen hundred plus downloads in less than three four months, and you guyshave been absolutely fabulous. So you guys, I wanted to give you a quicklittle update, I'm actually going to be recording from hereon out or releasingepisodes once every two weeks and I'm moving it to Thursday mornings versusthe Wednesday mornings. I've come across a couple of awesome projectsthat I couldn't say no to, and although the podcast is my heart and my baby, Ineed to take a little bit of a stepback, I'm not going to end this season yet,which is awesome I'll continue going as long as I can, and hopefully Wi'll beable to record at least another eight to ten episodes before I end season,one so to all those amazing supporters out there. You guys, thank you so verymuch for tuning in every week. I do apologize for the inconvenience for allof those people who continue to support me regularly, but I promise you thatcontent is just going to get better all right. So now shifting gears youguys today I have teacher activist and social media impacter group Yagot Siawho's joining me today. TUBIA. Thank you so very much for agreeing to be onthe show. Oh no man, it's absolutely my pleasure.We go way back. So this is super personal and really great to see womencoming up powerful women and power women. Absolutely you know it seemslike that's the best theme that has come out of all of this craziness that's beenhappening over the last couple of years. The fact that you mentioned, like womenempowering women. You know it really has been one of the reasons why thispodcast launched and the fact that I continue to reach out to women likeyourself that are doing some really fabulous things out there, and you know I want to bring a voice tothe people out there that are listening so that they know there are these womenwho are remarkable just like yourself that are doing just like some reallyamazing things O. I want to thank you for doing what you do, girl, no problem. Man. You already know howit is. It's all good, absolutely it's a pleasure to be here and be a part ofeverything and watching you grow absolutely im here for oh, so, just alittle background for everybody, who's listening so Wubi and I actually wentto middle school together, shut out to Edna, Carcoota, cougars, hello, okay, exactly so robea tell me alittle bit about like your social interactions when you were in middleschool and high school like what were you about? What really drove you, youknow what were those things that people would be like man, Nas will be overthere. Well, when I was, I remember MiddleSchool and high school, I kind of it's funny because it was very diverseback then, but it always felt like I was kind of like the minority, but itdidn't really matter like in our neighborhood and things like that, likeit was very open and welcoming, and I never really felt some of the samepressures that other people did. But I...

...definitely remember I because I kind offelt to some degree that you know I was kind of different than everybody else.I wasn't exactly like e hottest thing. I was kind of like the Tomboy, but Ithe interactions that I remember having with people was just like everybody.Everybody was just O. Oh that's! Oh that's! Wy, girl, ialike, okay, all right! That's cool!That's fine! I mean I that's the way you want to identify me. That's fine, but it wasn'tnecessarily issue, but I definitely remember meeting people from alldifferent walks of life and backgrounds and religions and beliefs, and thingslike that. But it was always like super welcoming and open for me like it's oneof the my high school junor years and even elementary was alway. I wasextremely fortunate man, I'm extremely blessed that had t e the upbringingthat I did even when it got it down to as lowas points. I was extremelyblessed to have those interactions because they made me exactly who I amso shut out. The in the car and peoplelike Yelteyehi agree hundre percent with everything you just said, but whatI think is really fascinating is that you use your platform to bring light to so many different things that are goingon in the communities that are underrepresented and the fact thatyou had this opportunity to really see this growing up, I think, is reallyinteresting. But what continues to drive you to bring light to thesethings? Honestly, I think that it comes down tojust a lack of understanding, I'm very open and understanding that people comefrom various walks of life and because I know kind of like what it's what itfeels like to be judged by other people, and I, from coming from thatperspective and having the friends that I wasfortunate enough to have at a at a very young age. It's like you know. I knowthat some people only click play sometimes on my videos, because of theway that I look, whether it's my actual appearance or the color of my skinthings like that, and it's not something that I necessarily agree with,but that's just the reality of the world that we're living inunfortunately, so whatever it is, that gets you to click play is besides thepoint so long as the message is being spread and the messages being heard,because I genuinely believe that whether you want to accept the truth ornot your conscience, somewhere inside as hurt it and once it hears it, itcan't ignore it will reside in there at some point in time and hopefully, withyou gaining experience, then you'll refer back to that in some way shapeformer fashion. So I feel like the more knowledge that you put out there, themore facts that you put out there, the more truth, the more empathy andcompassion and things like that that you share out with the world it just.It comes back and eventually it'll in that change. So my inspiration- andwhat keeps me going is the hope and the Fath that people start to really demonstrate the theempathy that they were born with were born with a wider range of emotions,and we pick and choose the ones that we choose to really invest. Inside of so Ihope that more and more people get to see that side of other people and ifyou can exercise a bit of empathy, then I think af that's the first step andwhere we need to go in order to see the world that we all should want to reallysee for Everyod, I mean you hit the nail on the head with that. Empathy iswhat really, if it was at the center of the world, we would all just realizethat we are pretty much the same oabsolutely. I find you know it's funny, because I one of my biggest things- and it wasthe header of my fan- PAG oncies, but for the longest time really cheaplittle thing that I made ik an APP, which is the picture of me and it saidto find strength in the struggle, or my hope is that somebody sees my page anddecides not to give up, because what I...

...found is it's a very universal thing.People want to divide themselves based on their geography, R, their professionor thei sociaeconomic background their race of their religion, but I can'tfind one person in the world that no matter what cannot relate to this senseof struggle and it's very similar to a baby. Anybody that's been around a babyand you pretend to cry, or whatever the baby just naturally wants to comfort.You wants to look at you and feel like. Oh No, like gives you a kiss orsomething like that. It's a natural human, instinct and emotion torecognize the struggle in somebody else. Struggle is a very universal thing.It's subjective, but it's highly relative, an if more people were ableto find something at this bare minimum of struggle if they could find just onething to relate upon and that's the sense of struggle, not necessarilyspecifics of it, then we would all be in the the place therwhere. We need togo that through that sense of struggling recognizing in another thatempathy and exercising and just from that perspective, it's a step in the inthe right direction. That's what I'm trying to thtsome PRAG GIRL! Yes, Iagree a hundred percent with what you're saying right now, but so okaytake us back to this moment. You're in your car. I want to say I walt t' believe atthat's the first place that you recorded, but I'm not a hundred percentsure if that was your first video. But let's just say that scenario is: ISPLAYING OUT RIGHT: You're you're in your car and you're like I need to getthis message that I have out like what was that fire that was witinside you that made you press play or made you press record, and on top ofthat like publish it on social media. Well, this was after trap on MartinI've been teaching in public education in the same neighborhood that weattended. I've lived here born and raise going to school, even collegeright there at University of Holly Cross, and now I'm teaching inside ofAlger Scharter and I'm seeing the best majority of my kids are AfricanAmerican. Now, when I was growing up because of my UPBRINGIN, a lot of thewhite kids per se, wouldn' necessarily be my friends because of my particularfamily upbringing, in the choices that some of my family members have me. So Ijust naturally I gravitated towards a particular type of culture but Noras adifferent type of COI man. So, but now that I'm teaching in New Orleans rightand I'm teaching these kids and even the even what people would deem the badkids they're, not bad kids, there's no such thing as a bad kid. In particular,I'm teaching Middle School Kids, twelve to fourteen fifteen aige range, justget a bad rep, and it's not. I know that because I kind of got that everyonce in a while, because I'm trying to be rebellious, but I had really goodteachers Miss Bill Misret, you know rock and people that would be honestand at car and be honest andstraightforward and just keep it honest and real with me and I'm looking atthese kids and there was an instance that happend right shortly after the semere ricecase, the young man, the young black man thatwas shot down and Gune down in the part and the the instance where this kid was Gunnedown, I'm driving home and you in New Orleans. It goes from bad neighborhood,Tho, good, neighborhood, bad neighborhood, a good neighborhood justlike that in the blink of an eye and I'm driving home- and I see one of mystudents- s is by a cop car. The lights are all out all these cops are out, andI see that and I stop and I asked what's going on and you can totallytell the students that are about that life and the ones that are not so thisparticular student that I'm looking at as I'm driving by at night and I'mlooking and I'm like. Okay. This is not...

...that student, I'm talking about pokemons and starwars like than this is not this kid iam curious to know what the heck is appen.So I pulled over and I askd the cops what's going on and they said, thetfits a description of somebody that just committed an arm robbery and Isaid okay. Well, what was the description? They said, you know midthe late entis black male and I'm thinking to myself that describes ninety percent of the Blak, owpopulation in New Orleans or the population in Te Orleans. But whatever,and then I informed in that they're questioning a minor and things likethat and just to make a long story short, it finally started to hit me andat this time this is when all lives matter, black lives matter in thiswhole battles coming before right, leading up to this and then I'msitting home one night, and I see on the TV that they're not going to beprosecuting the police officers that shot and killed some, but to me arihtes in a few seconds, and then, when I see that I don't know what it was,but something Hittin me because in my heart I know that all lives matter, but it was in epiphany inside of myhead, because I finally understood what they were saying in black lives matter.Black guys matter wasn't saying that all lives, don't matter t saying thatall lives can't matter until black lives matter too and they're includedin that conversation, and then that cohort that's when it finally hit meand that's when I said you know what I see all this stuff on my timeline. Isee all these all lives matter and I understand what you're saying, but atthe same point I have these experiences. I have these things within my life ofmy background and me growing up the way that I did me being in my classroom me.Seeing these things first hand that I get it and now that it's me getting it,I want to share that. I want you to understand this. This is what it'ssaying and then also I found it as a moral issue for me because at the endof that first video, I just think we remember saying that I can't go into myclassroom and tell these kids that you can be anything that you want to be,but when they step outside of my fur walls, it's an entirely differentscenario for them. Simply because of the way that they look in comparison tome, so I just said screw it and I threw thecars up in the air and I let them fall where they make andthat's how it happend. Now what wasthe? Obviously you got pretty big prettyquickly because of that video. So what was the? What were you hearingas far as comments are concerned, or I mean when you realize? Oh, my God, thisis this- is going viral? Oh my Goder, the comments Eridid, I wasnot. I was not precared because I was never.I would really did it only for like the people. I didn't even realize that thevideo was public. I didn't realize that my post were public at that time,because I was only getting on facebook to drop like by that point. I had maybelike twohsand followers or something like that, but that's them from me andmy writings and things like that in my post in my selfies for my journal andand just things that I've written out and all those types of things from acompletely separate thing and the next thing I knew I'm getting these notifications and myphone is going dead like every two hours, because it's just comment aftercomment and the the the comments rain from. Oh, my God, who is this whalt? I can't even think what is thispog? What is APO, I'm like what is a park exactly PA wg of excuse, myfriends, but a fat as Girl Kwhat? I was like I didn't even know. That wasthe thing and then world start hiphop picked it up and then don't even readthe commomis on World Star hiphop girl. It is bad for your mental health. Everycomment there was just like something bbd and I'm like. I don't even knowwhat these acronems stand for yeah. It was totally inappropriate, soso the ones where they're like...

...holy crap, like this completely changesthings because I said in the video that I was just awhite lady from New Orleans and it's the truth so for for people who are onthe brink of feeling, like they don't understand or because of race, there'ssuch a difference that it like they don't there's nobody there that can empathizeor or truly see where they're coming from it was. It was inspiring and itgave them a little bit of hope. So there's a wide range and then obviouslythe the violent death, rits and all kinds of stuff. So there was awiderrange of of responses to it, so it just wentpositive to negative and everything in between. I never even knew stuff likethat. Exs At hi sow crazy, I mean so. It is interesting right, like you are a white woman from New Orleansright in the fact that a lot of people don't understand that cultural makeup,when you do go to public school or magnet school in New Orleans that it isvery diverse and you get exposed to all of these cultural backgrounds, I mean there wereHispanic Puerto Rican. You know black white Arab. We had everything, eigte anreverything but fore someone on the outside, looking in and being like. Why is this white woman telling me myhistory? Why is this white woman telling me about the injustice, theinjustness of the society that I already know, and I saves every day you know. How was that? Oh absolutely I'm sureyou got that. I mean I just looked at some of those stuff and I was like Owaiwhat people, because you know I mean even I'm Hispanic and I'm sure thereare those moments, sometimes Hor. I'm like well this person's gettingrecognition. We've been saying this all long, but you know how was that experience? Howdid you go yo when you were getting that backlash? I mean here's. The thing that's, thebeautiful part about empathy is because empathy allows me and affords me theopportunity to see where they're coming from I see where your hesitancy is in.Even believing me. I understand it because I know history. I know everysingle feeling that you have is absolutely one hundred percent valid,but I can't force you to believe me when everything comes down to it. Ican't force you to see pass the history and to see what's going on right now inthe present. All I can do is speak my truth and tell you that I'm coming froma place of empathy and not sympathy. I never once said that I could sympasizewith you. I said that I culd empathize with you. I will never know what it islike to be a black woman or a black man or a Hispanic or Latina growing up inNew Orleans or anywhere else in the world. I'll never know that and viceversa. I said that I can see where you're coming from, I can understand,maybe not fully, but I can appreciate your struggle, that's where I said, andthat's always the stance that I've always been. I literally that was oneof the things that I said even in that specific video is because of that, likeI can understand I'll, never know what it's like I'll,never know what it's like, but that doesn't remove me of my ability toempathize and at the end of the day you look at people throughout history,because I am a historian people throughout history. They recognize thatthe bigger picter is not about race. It's not about any of those societalthings that certain people within our government or just our culture, tend toput us into in order to get us the conflict with one another. So that way,we don't see that we're all being screwed by the same group. They want us to fight amongst eachother. It was never for me. I just I had a message that I felt like I neededto deliver really to the people within my circle, because I wanted to notnecessarily draw a line, but I wanted...

...it to be clear as to where I stood andwhy, where you chose to fall after that is not my fault and not my problem. Ireally just didn't care and I guess that's where the bravery came in,because I feel like that's. That's the bravest thing that a personcould do is to own and to step forward and Sostand, resolute behind theirconvictions. Andto again let the cars fall where they make. I'm not here, I'mhere to be onapologetically myself and it comes off. Sometimes its arrogancelike how dare this person sit here and try to talk on these things? But inreality it's not arrogance. Its self love is Selfworth. I know myself, Iknow where I'm coming from. I know that I mean absolutely nothing that I can'tspeak with a hundred percent ununderstanding from where you're,where you're coming from, because I'll never fully know. But at the same pointI feel for you, my brother, my sister honestly and I'm doing whatever I cannot necessarly I've. Never once done any of my videos that talk about racialinjustices towards black people and so talking towards black people talking attalking down. No I've actually addressed specifically people that lookexactly like me, because I'm trying to get them to understand, because noteverybody that looks like me was afforded the same privileges that I hadto experience and see the same things that I did so I'm trying to get them toreally understand. I think it's such a great thing that you have the abilityto stand in the place that you do. I mean it's got to be tough. Have yougotten any backlash from your own personal relationships like your familyor personal friends that you in the past were close to, but then when theysaw the stance you were taking had some negative comment or whatever,because I mean you know. Obviously, what you're saying is true I'll say that it goes both ways, because you have thepeople that are going to distance themselves, whether they say it or not.You have the people that are going to distance themselves from you becausethey're like like, I don't want to be a part of it. You know they're kind ofmore low key and things like that, which is understandable. I signed upfor it and you did you didn't, even though I really technically didn't, butit happened. So it's just kind of like well here it is, but then you also onthe other side, th the if anything's been the hardest thing to deal with inmy personal life, and even my professional life is the people thatactually come in because they're looking for a step up, because they seethat now you got millions of followers, then they're going to sit there and tryto come in and try to make it come up, offer you and they're only hangingaround you because of what you can do for them and not what you mean to them. So when it comes down to it, it's you have to be more cautious. Peoplecome with their own demons just in general, but whenever you come with thesocial media platform in this age, where social media means everything tosome people and theres notoriety, and things like that, it comes to a certainpoint that you really have to be solid and firm and cautious about who you letwithin your circle, because not everybody, that's in your circle isgoing to be ready to roll with you. When everything comes down to it. Youhave to be very firm and Conscientus of those people thatare there, because some people are only going to have your back when everythingsaid and done only long enough to stab you in and only until they get whatthey need from you. So it's it's a double edge. Sword. I've had you knowpeople kind of fall back understandingly, so no love lost that'St, wich es to you sype stuff, andthen I've had the people that are going to jump on and be like. Okay. Well canyou share this? Can you go like my video? Can you come here and do this?Can you do thit and it's like coming from somebody who never necessarilywanted it and it just kind of happened that it's like? Well, I mean I don'teven promote myself like I possibly Mi...

...and it's like it kind of hurts my feelings, becauseit's like I didn't, really mean anything to you before, but now thatI'm of some kind of intrinsic value or or monetary value to you or your ego, then all of a sudden Ibecome relevant to you. So it's been an interesting experience ever since allthis begin O, maybe two three years ago. So how do you then go? Let's say youget three hsend notifications a day, somepeople who are writing you, some people who who are not? How do you go aboutchoosing what to answer to when you feel, obviously that some people arehave those intentions like how do you filter through that I mean at this point. I can't even gointo my dms, because there are literally so many dms that it's I cai, don't even know where to start. I really don't even know where to startand then plus I'm I'm working as a teacher still, I am still trying towrite I'm still trying to work on my book. I'm still trying to you know,work on me personally and I'm still trying to be a good friend to those inmy circle. I'm still trying to be a mom, I'm still trying to beat all thesedifferent things, and it's not to say that I don't want to be. I want to bethere for every single person that reaches out and reaches out to me. Thatis on on something like Yo, like your post, really motivated me, your postreally inspired me. Thank you so much and or they just want to talk andthings like that, like I it's torture for me, sometimes becauseI wish that I had like a million of me that could go into my dms and likepersonally respond to each of these people in a way that I would deem youknow appropriate and things like that, but it doesn't work that way. So I kindof go through my dn sometimes, and I I look at the ones that you can. Youcan almost tell you, can almost hear theies sincerity and their authenticityin their and their message that they needsomebody or they they are genuinely thankful and they're. Consistent. Theconsistency is the biggest thing, because somebody can send a randommessage every once in a while, but if somebody is genuinely consistent and showing support and showing loveand even being honest, unapologetically honest when you make a mistake or youstep out of character, those are the qualities and characteristics that Ilook for in somebody who's trying to really get in that type of circle withme ill the's, some really good qualities.To look for. I think something. That's really interesting that you said. Whileyou were talking about all this, is you know this wasn't something that youinitially sought out for, and it just kind of happened to you to so it reallydid. I didn't think that that vary was gingto. Go Viral. I really didn't. Sowhat would you want? The people who see Ruh Yagazzia the social media impactor? What would you want them totake in a consideration when they're looking at your social media poofs orwhen they're you know, watching your videos? I want them to see what I wish thateverybody would see when they look at another individual. I want them to see, obviously I'm wanting to see strength,but I wantthem to see me being unapologetically myself and I',affording me the opportunity to be that which encompasses every aspect of mypersonality, my Highes, My loas, my in betweens my moments when I'm a littlebit extra a my homens when I'm not fully one hundred percent knee. I wantthem to allow me and afford me the capability of justbeing human, which is no different than anybody else,and I believe that when it comes down to having such a significant socialmedia following that people,...

...they try to tell you what to do. Eventhe video I posted this evening, a man was telling me to stop yelling and toact like a lady or whatever the case may be, and I can't stand when somebodytells me to stop acting black or you know, stop yelling or whatever, asif I'm angry, when it's passion or to stop acting a certain way as if you canact any other way. There aren't people that put on shows. But if I amconsistently this person, then I deserve a Damn Oscar and I will waitwit anoge nation, for this Col that I'm an if this is all a acts. I really needthat Osca nomination to come through at any point in time, because this is justwho I am and I'm unapologetically myself and I firmly believe at thispoint. In my life, like t e, the right people will always stick around theright. People will understand that you have the right to be who you are in theright. People will stick around in the wrong people. Won't they will excusethemselves from your circle. Naturally, you don't have to necessarily forcethem out. All though toxic people do deserve an x Foan that again butesavethat again sorry, no you're good toxic people absolutelydo and norm more often than that theylhemprobably weed themselves out ofthere expose themselves. Ther they'll expose themselves in that, but it comesdown to whether or not you recognize the red flax that are getting t hat, that pop upevery once in a while, and whether or not you're going to sit there andcollect them and wrap yourself in your own ego afteryou, stitche them all together and made some kind of egotistical blanket inorder to to comfort your own ego and pride or whether or not you're going tocall them out on it. I just it wasn't something that I sought out.It just happened and it just sometimes things just go the way that they go. Ijust want people to see that no matter what there is strength to be found inyour struggle- and there is purpose within your pain and one of the biggeststringths that I have is that I'm like I said, I'm unapologetically myself andyou take me for what I am in. All of its entirety or you don't it's cool,either way: There's no love loss there and as savages this is going to sound. Ireally don't care, because one of the things that I tell my students at theend of the day, one of the things that even hates the the subject of my bookused to tell me is that there's no bunk bats in a casket baby girl. The onlyperson you have to worry about when you put your bed to the pillow at night isyourself in your own conscience. So as long as you're living your life andyou're happy with yourself, and even if you're not, but you use that as a formin a stepping stone of growth and not regret, then you're in good hands can the rightpeople sthick around the wrong people they'll find their way out one wayanother. That is such a good point to make, I mean, I'm pretty sure everyonewho's listening right now is probably notting their head and being like. Yes,Tox it people red flag, Yo, but the snak like tout of myalike choose yourlane and I think you've hit on some some amazing points, especially aboutlearning how to be unapologetically yourself and being basically likeliving in your truth and being yourself and not worrying about the guy who'sbehind the screen, who's telling you hey, stop being youre too black oryou're too loud or you're being whoever and it's like dude. This is who I am,and you know it's one of the best parts about life. Is that moment when youfinally get to a space where you're like you know what this is, who I amand if you don't like me, then Fu and I think it happens when you turn thirty,that's just my own personal perspective. I think beautiful that you're sittinghere you're telling these kids this at such a young age, especially childrenwho you know society won't always be...

...fair to them. You know, were you know, sometimes theywalk into a room and are already being prejudged and you're like just be whoyou are. It is what it is it's unfortunate, because I have toprepare my students. Sadly, and it's one of the biggestthings I came from my video that I've had o kind of incorporate in a verysubtle way of preparing them for the world. That'soutside of my fourwalls, the world that doesn't give second chances the worldthat isn't going to be nice whenever they break things down toyou, and sometimes those lessons are going to come hard and they're going tocome. fastand before you know it again, like Hey's learned at nineeen he's just hewas just a few short years older than some of the students that I teach in myclassroom now, and he learned at such a very fast, quick paced way that theworld is unapologetic in its opinion towards you, hwhy shouldn't, you beunapologetic about your contribution to the world. It's when you finally get to that pointwhere you understand and you're comfortable with yourself and you own,every aspect of who you are, and you love yourself enough to put yourselfout there. A lot of people find that type of vulnerability and transparencyto be a weakness, but in reality it is the most brave and fearless thing thatyou could possibly do because you're saying thatI am not, I am not willing to conform to what your norm is. People Laugh atme and they cry jokes, because I'm different, but I sit back sometimes,and I legit chuckle at least three at least three chuck three solid Chucke. Isit back and I get us all e three chuckles. Whenever people laugh at mebecause I'm a little bit different than others and I get those three chucklessimply because you're all the same, you want to be accepted so much by societythat you're willing to compromise on your character and your integrity andbe untrue to who the hell you are simply to be accepted. I'd rather bedifferent than be what's regular. That's what a lot of people don'tunderstand is one of the most brave things that you could possibly do. Hmm,let it be what it is, let it be r. Now you keep talking about Hays andthis potential book you're hinting on. Why don't you tell us a little bitabout this like who's, this Guy Ho's? Why was he who? Why was he soinfluential in your life? And what can we be expecting from you? I keep I's, Oh God it's! I can't help it at this point, becauseI'm literally ensrenched in it and the more that I find out about him and themore that I research about him is. I can't help Wuth to bring thim up allthe name time, because some of the gyms that this man dropped on me as such ayoung age he's also one of the reasons why I speak about some of the thingsthat I speak on. I speak fom my kids, but has was a black man in on thousandnine hundred and sixty seven black men all his life, obviously, but in one thousand nine hundred andsixty seven, he was prosecuted and accused with two of his other friendsof committing a murder here in Nworleans and a robbery and murder andhe went to jail. He took a plea deal wint to Joe for what he thought wasgoing to be ten years and six months, but wind up spending a life sentence orgetting sentenced to life and then goal estate penantentary for a murder that he took no part inabsolutely one hundred percent wasn't even in the room outside, but he was ablack man in New Orleans s. You know in the heart of the civilright movement when Martin King was...

...still around, and all these things aregoing on is just like wow, like somebody like that. My book is mainlyon the things that he used to to talk to me all the time like the no bunkbeds in the casket, he told me the the same boiling water that hardensthe eggs oftens the potato. It's not. Your circumstances is once you're madeof like no matter what you go through inlife. It doesn't really matter what happens to you. It matters is yourcontent. It matters what what you have inside, and this is a man who wisprobably the most sweetest, the most infectious personality and laughter andhe was robbed of thirty years of his life in prison and the only reason whyI had the intimate knowledge and the privilege of knowing him was because myfather was a criminal defense attorney and the case was brought to him and Heys got released, but when he gotreleased he came to live with us, so he lived with us for a few shortyears before he sadly was murdered in the sameneighborhood that I teach now and he lived a very, very simple butunapologetic life, but he always told me that your transparency in your yourability to fight and fearlessness and things like that, those things weregoing to make you an empathetic person. You would have an understanding of theworld that not many people would, and he taught me how to love people. Hetaught me that even the people that have done you really really wrong. Hewould say that you don't wish some bad. You don't wish them good. You wish themthe life that they deserve and you completely absolve yourself from t e,the obligation of their fate or their results of their fate and their destiny.It has nothing to do with you. They'll get the light that they deserve eitherway it goats. So for somebody to go through such turmoil to have such a badexperience and to beribed of thirty years unjustly, and to still have thatmuch positivity and love an empathy, I don't know how he did it, but thatthat's to me is', it's inspiring it's encouraging and it's like. If this mancan do it, I don't see what the hell of my excuse is. I can't think of one yeahbiger, one at all S, I'd love to hear how much passion you have when you'retalking in general, but this when you're talking about this particularstory and when we had a chance to talk about it. The other day, it just sounds,like you know, there's passion and there's anger and frustration, but thenthere's like passion and something that changes something in you and it seemsas though the story of of Hays and this book that you're working on really justit light something something very different in you, and I wanted to tellyou that the other day when we were talking about it and and the way that you're talking aboutit now, I just I see that there is something about this that reallyintrigues you, and I want you to keep following that because it sounds likeit will be something very powerful for you absolutely it is like I can getemotional behind it, because I'm I feel like sometimes even in the videos thatI've done, that I almost I feel like he's speaking through me,because these are the type of messages that I know that he's would appreciate.These are the things that he was telling me as such a young Asian I wasmade of. I was made to tell this story. I was the whole title of the book is existingbeyond existence. It is his theory that sometimes the light that we lead andthe choices that we make when we leave this life can sometimes drop a pedal up,a pebble that can create a wave that could potentially change the life inthe course of somebody else's life in the ties of somebody else is like.Maybe that's why I got into education. Maybe that's why I speak in my videosand I'm I don't think twice whenever I...

...hit record on my phone because life lessons like that, the things thatI've endured, the things that I've survived have given me and afforded me theopportunity all of these things, I'm an accumulation of every good thing. Badthing, that's ever happened just like we all are, but we make a conscientiouschoice every single day to pick and choose which emotions we choose to livein and unpack, and I choose more often than not, even though I get in myfeelings no different than anybody else. I choose to untack in well in the happymoments in the positive things inds to know that, even when I get down intothe depths- and I visit them- they're not forever, it's just the moment andjust like I survived all the others, I'll survive this and again I just goback to him and en just I just remind myself that I couldn't imagine being in thatposition for that period of time, knowing that it's just wrong, like youjust know what is right and what is wrong and feeling like wrong was done to me in living that every single day of yourlife and still no matter what choosing to unpack in happiness and love andacceptance and forgiveness like I just I find that tobe a very rewarding experience and Ialmost feel like it would be unbecoming of everything that Hays ever saw in meif I did not share his story. So when can we expect for these movements to start happeningon your book? My deadline, ironically enough, this whole the bookon Hames wasn't necessarily my original thing. I was originally going to be D.I was originally working on an autobiography for three years: I'vewritten in a journal almost every day since I was ten and I shared that onechapter on haze on social media and then shortly after my computer crash.So I lost everything three years worth of work and then, like two or threeweeks later, sthorm came through destroyed all of my journals, twentyyears worth the journals gone, but that was the only chapter that got saved soin true Haye's fashion. I decided that it was the it wasn't.The story I was meant to tell and if made me focus more into haze story, soI've been working on it literally for like two years now and it's it's been emotional, but ie setthe deadline for myself to release the book on December fifteen and then tospend two thousand and twenty going around and sharing this man's story andTnot just his story, but everything that he believed everything that was ofhis content and his message and his whole vibe of existing beyond existence.He exists beyond his existence in his proof, because otherwise I wouldn't betalking about him. He changed the course of my life and the fact that I'mhere, even talking about him and mentioning him twenty something yearslater, is proof that this man, whether he knew it or not or was justspeaking, grabber, really didn't matter. He believed it, but it was true becausehe changed the course of my life. He changed my tides. He evn gave me that gift and I feel likeif people could just pay attention to what he used to calllike moments of impact. If people paid attention more to those things, they'd be far more open to the to thefact that you come across moments of impact waymore often than you probably care so admit. It's just people are so busy andeasily distracted these days that they don't pay attention to the moments theycould potentially change their light. Maybe they're scared to to be honest,but notheless. I dropped the book detemmerfifteen and my plan is to two Thousan...

...and twenty set up Yegis much aspossible of traveling as much as possible, going to any city to meet indgreet talk about hases talk about this belief. Talk about existing beyondexistence, talk about moments of impact, talk about positivity, talk about andbring about just a movement of positive bods, all of two thousand and twenty and thenpotentially run for office at the end. It yes gir. You know I feel about that.So I'm Likit, it's a fear of mine. I'veconquered all the others, so I mean I figure. Why not at this pointdefinitely been a fear of mine to run for office and I've hesitated at tothis point, but I've also conquered all of my other fears. So this is definitely one that I'm notwilling to set to theside so two thousand and twenty I will be runningfor office. You heard it here yoall. She is going to run for often wothusand and twenty there's a you, have a very powerful two thousand and twentyand I'm excited to hear about it and continue to get updated about it. Andyou know I really. I think it's so great thatone you're wanting to continue to elevate the story of a man who's nolonger here who changed the course of your life, and it's also almostparallel to what you do for these students every day, because you willlive beyond your legacy, even if it's just in your students, Oh boy, is o your gonna m n Chok that Ilove my kids so much, and I see them now. My first group of kids graduated lastyear and some of them are in college. Some of them are serving in themilitary, some of them. I still see like you, know, working in the stores-and you know the windixies and the Walmarts, and things like that- and you know the funny thing is- isthat they, some of them, follow me now on Social Medi, because they can't,because I wasn't playing those times Tcher, but now they write me sometimes or they saysomething to me and it's absolutely one hundred percent it just it's veryhumbling. And it's honestly what keeps me it's Pon, my biggest holdback from from doing more with the social media,because I know the power that I have in order to leave the classroom andmake money doing those things. But I always told myself that I would do tenyears. This is my tenth year and I always told myself that I would only leave if it got to a point where Ifelt like it was in good hands and also that I felt like I could do more for mykids if I was outside in a position outside- and I feel like at this point-one of the main things when it came down to it of even doing that originalvideo was me telling my kids to live their dreams and they can be anythingthat they want to be. It O find the courage in t the braveryes of pursue hir their beliefs and just standfir behind what they, what they have inside of them and theirpassions, and then, when it comes down to it, I don't do it myself. I can't go in and be a hypocrite infront of my kids and trust me. They never neglect to let you know andremind you, but I think that it's is beautiful, that my kids, sometimes theythey hit me up, and they say things like that. Is it's Ik Gi that it's truly humbling, but itjust reminds me as Tho why I do what I do and why I stayed as long as I did,but I think at this point that there's there's more students that are notnecessarily my students and I feel that it's it's my time. I've never felt itmore than now than never to share hes a story, but also to share the biggerpicture that there's even adults that...

...want it and they're hungry for it andthey'r Thursdy for it, but they didn't. They did necessarilyhave like a MISCARCIA. They didn't have HEM ASG, so they're they're wanting tounderstand they're wanting to emphathize, but they haven't yet foundthe person so really articulated in the way that they can understand it. And ifI could bring my approaches from the classroomand put it on a broader perspective and share it with a broader base, then I feel like I'd, be paying hazes gift forward. I don't know any other way to reallysay it's be honest. I feel like it's a gift that he was owed upon me and Ifeel like it's just something that I should. I should share with more people. Well, I think you have a greatopportunity and anything that youare going to do is going to reflect in sucha large way and I hope nothing but success for you on your journey- andyou know I' mentioned this to you last time. If there's anything that I can doto be a part of that or anything that you need, please don't hesitate. I love helpingpeople. My biggest things personally is making sure that I help people andsometimes to my own detriment. I have to work out it. A litte trust me.I know that wic. You know I meanit's e thing. It's like you know who are we ifwe cannot help the people who are around ors? The people who have suchamazing messages to give to some I mean like the things that you're doing for people in general. Your I saw actuallywhat's interesting is I saw a message of this gentleman and it stuck out inmy mind when Yeuh. Obviously I was doing a little bit of backgroundresearch right before, but the guy was like this is something that we needed. You know we needed that we needed youto come out with your voice and it shows with the amount of people thatare so interested in hearing you Ti Dayn and day out, and I'm telling you.I truly believe that you're just going to continue making some awesome wavesand you're going to continue impacting people all across the board, includingyour students. Oh, I can only hope that I'm a fordedthe I can only hope that I live you'll, begood you'll, be good. You want the car girl, Bayminoh Man, Seyo, es n Mabe seonds, a nine purply gold LE!Oh, that's so funny I mean it's funny, I'm sure people are like what are theytalking about, but you know in New Orleans it's the school. You went toit's, you know what neighborhood you're from and it's not that college. It'salways about high school, the Middle School, who your friends are, who yourmom and am yeah in the big deal, Tis Yathink that people just in general. Ithink that's why I'm a little bit understanding when people kind of judgeme based upon my Hanerism, so the way that I speak and I always just kind ofchuckle, because it's bairly common here at least- and I also find italmost ironic, sometimes that people look at people like Harry Connick, forinstance, and he has a little bit of a swag to him. But nobody says anythingand I'm like is that a gender thing like I don't know what it is. But thenagain I am a little bit rigt, but I mean I spent the majority of my life in thefood in the cutoff, so I don't necessarily come from the sameDakgroundis in, but there's a different vibe here in New Orleans, and youmentioned in it. Our School is very representative of the culture ingeneral and now that I know the history of it from the frinks to the to sorry from the French to Ou, know theSpanish to the Germans, to the Irish, to the African influence to all thesedifferent cultures. Thirty, seven of the s of the at least the forty eighththay that are around drain into and if it eventually would reach the reach twoNew Orleans in the port of New Orleans. So you have to understand.

There's such a diverse culture in NewOrleans that people are very people from the outside, looking in or justlike old o. This is weird, like I don't understand this, but it's fairly normalhere, like it's, it's so funny when I travel to other places and peopledon't get it or I open my mouth in a video and things like that. Peopledon't necessarily understand, but people from New Orleans get it because it's it just makes sense, but other people they look and they there's sthereostereotypical boxes, ofwhich I tell people don't put people on Serie typical boxes, because you'reonly going to hurt yourselves aboyt the corners, but whenever you put people inthose stereotypical boxes for your own comfort and your own convenience, itif confuses the hell out of you. But that's not for me, that's not myfault or my problem, but it's I'm very fortunate to come from our city and tohave that upbringing and to have that diversity in my culture, because againall those things led me up to where I am so. I think that the ISIT's it's just so I everything that II can't help ut to keep bitchof thehay, everything that hazes or my upbringing and things like that broughtme up to. I feel like there's there's a purpose behind it all the up the downs,everything it's just all kind of going to fall inplace, and I know that o but yeah. It's definitely Ander Warans coature, we'redefinitely very competitive. The high schools on up, but everything about is, is very, verydifferent and very unique, very God absonitely. Definitely well before wewrap up. I got one last question for you. So when we end this interview- Oh God,you know it's so wain this interview, soy. We get offthe phone. All of a sudden. Somebody calls you and says: Bruvia. You justwon ten million dollars. What would you do oo? Oh my God, always joke on my socialmedia that the powers that Ye don't wantrich because because they just you, think that I'monfiltered now just magine the the levels of F that I will not ive atthat. Point honestly when I, when I considerd, tofollow my dad's footsteps and do the type of things that he did for he andshould go to law school and things like that. I always wanted to go into lawschool and I recently pursued it and it's I wanted to do it mainly because Ididn't want not necessarily do civil right law anymore. The month the socialmedia stuff kicked off. I wanted to actually get my law degree for the Solpurpose of cross prosecuting corrupt politician I'N. anybody anybod that that's what I'm going todedicate my ti million dollars to now I want to. I would get my law degree and dedicate myentire life to to literally prosecuting corrupt politicians, because you swearnotes of the Constitution and for as long as America has existed, it hasalways been the upper class versus the lower class and when everything saidand done, William mckimley in the electon of t aneight hdred N. Ninety six said that you know. If you burn down the cities, thecities would grow again based up on the strength of the American people out inthe West. But if you burn down the people down the West, then you burn outthe people that are out there. The American people, you burn them and youburn their farms in their existence. Out of the West, and literally the cities would notexist because it's true and is very...

...indicative of the Times of today. Ifyou burn the bottom, ninety, the top one cannot exist. The bottom niney will exist without thetop, the top Tan, the TOPC one. I want people to pursue their ends to the best of their abilityand what was their natural right given to them by God, the foundations of thiscountry. I want people to be helped equally to the rule of law. I wantpeople to equally be looked at and be given due process. I want people tohave life liberty and to pursue their happiness to his fulles bounds and IAM.I have gotten really honest to God: Sick and tired of the injustices base,the Pon class based upon racet racial lines based upon all of these thingsthat have been implemented, andallowed, to continue through education throughnumerous avenues and pipelines. My ten million would honestly be gearedtowards making sure those things are handled and Takengcare of. Obviously, my instinct is like you know what I want a house on a car.I want to Bak kids to be good. I want to build a school in my mind. Those would be those thingsbut at the forefront of my head, I want to make the biggest impact possible andnot just for me or the people most intimately involved with me. I want tomake the biggest impact globally and I believe that paying it forward nodifferent than hes did for me. I believe in paving it forward and sayingthat if I can impact these people as one of th reasons, why I go by impactor not social media influencer, I don't want to influence. I want to impactbecause impacts last longer influences are fat. I want to impact people, Iwant to make a difference and those people who are impacted. The way that Iwas infacted will be continuous. It will be a ripple, it will be a tie. Itwill be a Synami that nobody can ignore. They can't evade it. It will bringabout the change that this world has been desperately seeking for and inDier NEDOF IK it ten million dollars. Yeah Gr, you best believe I'm changingthe world with that one. But in the meantime, I'm just going to take mylittle forty five USAD OA, I'm gonna do my little thig with what Ican in my little socal media following and try to infect as many people aspossible. Inte Le One would say I mean ind social media followers you'realready globally, impacting right. So one would say you probably already haveyour ten million you just have to manifest it yeah. To shake. I mean Ihave my momen Mo momens, but yes, ohma well girl. It has been such a pleasurehaving you on the show today. Why don't you let the listeners know where theycan follow you on social media, so they can continue to find out moreinformation about. You know when your book launches and any other things thatyou have going on, you know to globally impact the world amen. Okay, you canfollow me on facebook. You Give Sypein Rubya, Garcia R, Ubia Garciis Boteermoi,or you can follow me on Instagram at Nola, in Ola, Ribia, Garcia at go to t e website. You can go to ArubiaGarciacom and then any other ways you would like to that's it. It twitter isthe same thing: Nola Rubia, Garcia, Lik, Isaid, facebook group, you Garsiainstagram is Nola Rubiagarzia, twitter, Nola Rubiagarsi in then rive Garccom,and that would be right. Well, you heard it her Yalshe is globallyimpacting for those of you who already follow her. I know she is amazing messages and she is going to be dropping thisbook that we're suexcited to anticipate.

So you guys be on the lookout for it,and you know make sure that every day that you're going out there try tothink about the things that she said today about how we impact and how wecan take those moments of impact with us. Thanks for tuning into empowermentand all that podcast with your host read Abou Tista want to help me growthe listener tribe, make sure to subscribe to this podcast and follow uson instagram and facebook under empowerment, and all that and remember,keep it positive or don't keep it at all.

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