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Empodera Latina
Empodera Latina

Season 1, Episode · 2 years ago

Growth with Collaboration with LT. Kellie Hall

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Have you been wanting to work with others to grow your brand or knowledge of a new industry? Kellie Hall, Lieutenant in the Navy & contestant for Miss California USA tells her empowering story and how collaborating with others has helped mold her career. Kellie talks all about breaking the stereotype, not being afraid to ask, working for free and so many much more! If you'd like to follow Kellie on her journey to Miss California USA @misscausa, follow her on instagram: @kellierenehall or @lieutenanthall  --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rita-bautista/message

You're listening to empowerment and all that podcast, your favorite podcast for women's empowerment, hosted by Rita Bautista. It's time to be reminded of the authority of your inner goddess and elevate the power within. Are you ready? Welcome back to another episode of empowerment and all that, your favorite podcast for female empowerment. On today's show we'll be talking about growing through collaboration, and my guest today is Kelly Hall. She is currently serving as an active duty lieutenant in the navy and is also a candidate for Miss California USA. Kelly, thanks so much for joining me today day. So much treata. So excited to be here with you. Yeah, me too, is so my God, Kelly, you have such an amazing story to tell, and one of the things that I'm pretty sure people are already wondering is like, how does someone who is in the navy get involved with becoming a contestant for Miss California? Yes, for mass this all the time. It's so funny because it was not calculated, it was not by design. My kind of adventure of patent tree started on this very topic of collaboration a four years ago, now over four years ago, I just, you know, I was already on this path of wanting to kind of personally develop and selfdeveloped and do something a little bit more difficult, but I didn't know what yet, and I was being being sent to Columbs, Ohio for my next duty station, and the navy reinventing the wheel of making friends is not something that I'm for into. So I saw commercial for Miss America and I was like that's a good idea, and so I just so happened to Google like Ohio competitions for pageants, not knowing like any difference between Miss USA Miss America, and so right away, I mean first week of living in Ohio, I applied to be a part of Miss Ohao USA. I had to get approval for the navy and ended up competing and I just knew would be such a great way to meet people. Those number one reason why I did Miss Ohio USA to start, and I accomplished that. I competed my first year and I had a great time and I met my current best friend that way. It was all amazing. But this whole aspect of like empowerment came from being in the pageant and being the navy, which I was not expecting. The response was like completely celebrated and the people loved it and they're like that's amazing, being the navy thing in a pageant. You know, that femininity being displayed. So that's why I continue doing it, and it definitely is not always an easy ride, but it kind of just fell into my lap. So that's why now I'm stationed in Los Angeles, California. I've only been here for about a month and a half, two months, but I decided to compete in Miss California USA in January. So you're just jumping right in and you didn't even wait for the night and to set up exactly. Well, I'm originally from California, so I was like how I'm not foreg into the state, let's just go for it here, right, right. So you mentioned that it didn't come without some challenges. So would have been some of the things that you've been able to overcome? While obviously, you know, being in the navy and also, which most people don't look at as like the most feminine, a little bit more feminine than the other branches, but still it's very so what challenges have you faced being in the military? And wanting to pursue pageantry...

...a lot. And I think first and foremost, when you are approaching anything, then might create a little adversity. You need to remember your intentions and why you're doing it, and then, second you need to have people around you who are supporting and encouraging you. So you know, I had into pageantry completely just with an open, are open mind, wanting to do something harder and challenging and more difficult, but also wanting to make friends. And so initially, when I signed up for Miss Ohio in two thousand and sixteen, my head shot went live online and I experienced just an extraordinary amount of cyber bolling. People were just like, you're if you're in the Navy Shoula Bey and pageant, we're you're never going to be taken seriously, like there are more important issues to you know, in the military and the world right now than standing on stage in Bikini. And that was just completely unexpected for me, because I wasn't doing a paget for like attention or for marketing. I was doing it because I wanted to do it, because it was it was difficult, and so I knew right then. I was like, Oh this is not going to be an easy journey moving forward, but, as is so much in life, there's going to be people who disagree with your decisions. You just have to remember why you're doing it and hopefully it's all for positive reasons. And then, at the end of the day, I had an amazing circle of mentors and friends, coaches who were like no, go for it, like we need someone like you in the military who's lieutenant, who's out there proving you can do both. So, if not you, then who? And I was like you're you're right, like, if not me, then who? So I just continue to kind of channel that and all that I do, whether it's pageantry or building a post or wearing makeup in uniform, which you would not even believe that that's like a huge decision every day. Like some people are terrified wear makeup in uniform because of like the backlash that you get. So I've just been like, you know what, if I could stay on stage and compete in a pageant, I could do anything. From the Board Board. Absolutely, I love the level of confidence that you have when you're talking about this because, thanks you know, it's sometimes it takes a little while for women to fall into that space of femininity and experiencing how it feels to be I mean, I don't even know that I would be confident enough to be in a bikini on stage right now, but you know, I mean what I love about those pageants, have been watching them since I was really little, was like, you know, the questions that they ask and it's always like these women are really just so busy doing some really amazing things. So can you, can you tell us a little bit about what it takes to be someone who actually competes, like what are the personalities that you've seen in all these women that you've met along the way? Well, it's so cliche, but even just to be competing is like amazing. But these women are astounding. They're so accomplished. They're obviously beautiful on the outside, but the stuff that they're doing in their community and their education and their professional careers is incredible. That I didn't realize that at first. You know, I I too had that like Sandra bullet mentality of everyone's an idiot, you know, like Oh, they're just pretty faces, and then I competed and I was like, oh my gosh, like she's getting her doctorate, she's getting her master's, she's a lawyer, she's a resident, and then I'm walking on stage a graduate US Nable Academy. I'm like, Oh, you know, I'm shattering that stereotype of what people think of Passian girls as well. So, at the end of the day, like to win, it has to you have to be even really have to do all of it and be the whole package. So not just are you doing amazing things in your personal life and professionalized, but you have to be that motivational speaker, public speaker, you have to be kind of a woman of the people and represent that stay well. So it's it's a...

...lot for sure, but any woman who's standing on that stage like they already are someone to be admired, because it takes so much confidence just to do what we do. Have you found a favorite story so far that you heard from any of the girls? You don't have to name names if you don't want to. Like an empowering story that you were like wow, I this is awesome and yeah, I do belong here with these women. You know, Um, I have had a lot, for sure. This is my fourth year competing, about my first year competing in California, but I'd say even just our current Miss USA, Chesley Christ she's competing at Miss Universe for it now and she's taken and passed the bar in two states, you know, and as a currently a lawyer. And the reason why she was motivated to do something like pageantry even while she was in law school was because she did like a practice or mock trial and killed it. You know, obviously is great speaker and all those things, but the only feedback she got was that she should consider wearing the skirt and the court room instead of pants, because it would be perceived better as a female. And so she ended up watching this whole women's fashionable white collar glamline for like women in business and what they should wear. And that was like before she got in Balk and patrontry. But then she found passiontry and was like, Oh, this is a perfect platform to showcase, like what I believe and what I'm doing, and that's kind of like me, like what I experienced in the navy and kind of people telling me should of be feminine. I didn't know how to get the world were it out there, and you know how to kind of shatter that mentality and then I found pageantry and I was like, Oh, here's a platform to do that. So even she's our current Miss USA, but even just that story alone motivates you to be like she's out there trying to prove that women can do at all. Doesn't matter what we're wearing, if wearing makeup, if we're not wearing makeup. It's all about confidence at end the day, and you need to stop kind of fitting us into this bubble of what we should look like, because for me it's I shouldn't look feminine and I'm being told not to wear make up for herds. You should wear skirt because that will be better in the courtroom. Like we should just look and be however we want to be. At the end of the day, she's take a seriously, because we have a lot to offer period. Absolutely I wholeheartedly agree with that message right now. I think one of the most beautiful things about living in two thousand and nineteen, now going into two thousand and twenty, is that we've had this extreme strike of women who are voicing being more real and being more honest, and I've seen a lot of people now who have started these galas that, instead of using heels. You can now wear sneakers and so like. There's like a sneaker gala movement where women are wearing like these SS awesome fall gowns. Yeah, and wearing, you know, tennis shoes versus heels them like. Oh, still not joining that movement, but although my feet. That's funny. Yeah, it'xtremely excited about, you know, moving away from from the heels. I do think that what you said is awesome. You know, it's we're moving away from the stereotype of who you're supposed to be and moving more into allowing people to just be who they're supposed to be or who they actually want to be. Right UNT I be exactly it said, like what society is telling us we should look like or be like. It's, you know, if I want to be in then eighty and I want to wear a red lipstick, I should, you know, as long as they're following regulations and uniform but, you know, like if I want to look nice, like I should be allowed to look nice. I shouldn't feel uncomfortable because I'm dressing feminine, and that's something that a lot of women in the military face. Like I get messages and it's absolutely insane from women who are, you know, junior in the military and they say they're being pulled aside because their body lotion smells too good...

...and they shouldn't wear that anymore because it's going to affect how the men and the unit see them, or they're being told like, you know, not to wear workout clothes to work because, you know, when they're working out on their lunch hour people are staring at them, or just things like that, when like that's a they problem, like it's a you problem, not an problem like if I want to wear a nice smelling bath and body works solution, I should be able to do that and it shouldn't affects your ability to work. So I'm trying to encourage all these women like where what you want to wear, do what you want to do. If you are you know, if you have that confidence you bring up to work like that is what should pay off, not how you look on the exterior. But I think it's a really good point that you're bringing up. Is, you know, and I'm interested to find out your perspective. Do you think that this is going to last a lot longer in the military right, that women are going to have to continue to like under or kind of like fly under the radar, or do you think that it's just going to continue snowballing and people like you will have the opportunity to can to new to empower women in the military, to say you can be who you are? You know, I mean, we're still obviously still serving our country. So what I mean how is it that it's going to take away from what you're doing? I think we're on the cusp of something really big because, you know, when I joined the navy about nine years ago now, it was just like unheard of that you would be feminine. And I was told my very first week of boot camp but that, you know, you shouldn't wear makeup, you know, don't wear heels, shouldn't you shouldn't even purchase your skirt that goes with your uniform because you're trying too hard to be feminine, just all of these things, and I was like why, like I have always loved being feminine, wearing makeup, but then at the end of the day, even in high school, putting my track shoes on and going and smoking all the guys like, but doing that with like, you know, full face of makeup. On and that was just me, like that's how I am, but it's not to get attention, it's not because I need to be legally blond, it's just that I like, you know, I feel more confident when I put together. So just from that nine years ago, and then I hit it again whenever I reported in my first ship five years ago. Same thing, like you need a dial back how you look and you know your I was the first female standing on board this ship in front of Twenty Six sailors. They never had a female division officer before. And right then I could be like, Oh, I need to swear up and down and I need to be all tough funning to not wear makeup, and I'm like, but that's not me at the end of the day. And so and then I did my job and you know, the sailors respected me still and I think that's what message needs to be put out. There is again, if you're being true yourself, that's all that matters and like your leadership will shine through, your confidence will shine through and ultimately, what your purposes that will shine through. So I feel as though I'm myself, as well as there's other females out there spearheading this message of being feminine in uniform, and if I could just be a small part of it, then I will be so happy. And I do have a little bit of leverage because I'm a lieutenant in the navy. You know, like a lot of women out there don't have a voice because they're not very high ranking and they in the military yet or they're just starting out. So they can't tell a senior ranking officer like screw you, I'm going to wear a lipstick. They have to be like, oh, yes, sir, yes, ma'am, like okay, whereas I'm an officer, I'm going to be like, who are you to say that I can't do this? So I really do have a voice and I'm going to use it. I'm going to use this platform and I'm going to take it to Miss California and you know, if I win Miss California, that that's even more of an example to set for women that you can do both. You can be on stage and we Miss California and wear a ball down and be in the military. From that point forward, people are really...

...not going to have much to say. They can't really say you can't anymore. Right, yeah, no, that's excellent. That's excellent, I mean that's honestly, that's the direction in which we need to continue going. And, like we need pioneers like you to continue moving that conversation forward and saying, who are you to tell me what I can and I can't do? If I want to wear my sweatpants, are my yoga pants to work, who care? Like or it should. It should bother you, like right, you need to just learn to live with us being everywhere, because that's where we're going. You don't need to buy Jim shorts down your knees because you're too afraid people are going to stare at your body like. That's so. That's again, that's a day problem, not a you problem, like, and that's what the mentality has to shift in our society. And so, as individuals, we just need to embrace who we are and stop worry about what other people are thinking. Absolutely. So, let me ask you this. How did you get involved in the navy? Like, what made you wake up one day and say, you know what, I'm gonna go into the Navy? Who? Well, I am a Navy Brat through and through. I was born in the Naval Hospital twenty seven years ago, so it's always kind of been in my blood. My Dad's in serving the navy for over three years now. By I was one of those people who just thought the navy was not for me. I was way too girly, love shopping and dresses and I was just like, there's not someone of the maybe that like looks like me or has the same interests me. I never saw those women on posters or in videos or anything like that. So I really didn't think that it was like my speed. But ultimately, at like seventeen, I started looking at different colleges and I've always been a kind of person that wanted to Max my potential no matter what. I always want to do like hardest, most challenging thing, and I ended up touring the US naval academy and a Napolis, Maryland, and everyone was in uniform and they were like marching around and they were saying yesterday have a no sir. I was like wow, this is tough and I just knew right then there, if I didn't go into the navy, that I would always wonder what if I hadn't gone into the Navy, because I could always go to a state school or during a sorority and kind of go down that path, but I knew choosing the harder path was something I couldn't turn my back to. So that's how and it's been one hundred percent the best decision I ever made in my entire life. I definitely have had an unconventional career, but I'm grateful for it and I wouldn't change a thing. Now, when you say unconventional, I remember you talking about your photography skills. Yeah, actually also a trained photographer. It's so in this kind of sounded like it was the beginning of how you started collaborating right, like to begin to build your team through working with others. So want to tell us a little bit about that? Yeah, well, it is been unconventional, but it's because I have really like dipped into multiple passions outside of the Navy, and it's insane how it all comes from full circle. Yeah, five years ago, I I always been really passionate about photography. I was, you know, on your book staff and its photography in college and all of those things, but never intended on like turning it into a business. But I landed myself this amazing mentor when I was living in Sandeo California. This was five years ago and you know, I had this bright, flashy new camera and this photographer was at a winery was like hey, like nice camera you got there his nace brant bender, and I was like Oh, thanks. He's like, if you want to learn how to use it, I'd be happy to show you. You know, not going to pay you anything, but you can hold my scrims and follow me at weddings. And I was like well, heck yeah, great. So, you know, I'm currently serving on a ship at that...

...time, but spending my weekends following and shadowing this guy around weddings and learning all the INS and outs of photography. And so working with him was how I learned how to run a business. Know, he was a twenty year experience photographer. He showed me how to operate as a wedding photographer and how to communicate with clients and how to market yourself and how to get referrals, which all led to my job now and recruiting now and the head medical worker out here in Californium. I just just taking over that rule now, but that is what this business is like. It is marketing and self marketing and referrals and social media and everything I learned from becoming an entrepreneur has translated into my career and recruiting as well. So it's amazing how you can work with people in all industries and you're teaching yourself skills you didn't even know that you would need later on and your career. Super Cool. Yeah, I remember when I first started out in podcasting, which was really literally not even six months ago. Crazy. Yeah, and you know it, and I don't know if you mind me sharing with everybody, but like word's actually found me, which I think is like a testament of one of those things where you're like, Oh my God, somebody actually is listening out there's you know, I'm searchable now, like, but it's, like you said, you know, you keep keeping yourself open to these things where you know you don't know where they're going to lead and sometimes they're not going to pay you anything at the beginning, but in the long run can just be such amazing skills that you pick up and you learn and so like. And now here I am, you know, interviewing you. Yeah, exactly, because I think the like a lot of people, have this mentality of like what's in it for me? Like as soon as they strike up a conversation, they're thinking, how is this person going to benefit me? How is this relationship going to benefit me? And what you need to realize is just like knowing each other and being connected with each other, that's already benefiting you. Like I would have never thought that meeting and shadowing a photographer what helped me become one of the best recruiters the nation in the navy. Like what, what's in like that wedding photographer versus like medical recruiting, but it did. You know, learning that marketing in those skills is so valuable and there are people out there who are smarter than you are and doing more than you are, and there are more skilled than you are and you need to have a dose that humble pie and just ask questions, because people are so knowledgeable and I promise you, if you ask people what they're doing, they're happy to talk about themselves. They're going to share their knowledge with you. It's incredible. Absolutely. I think it's one of those things that you said, is like not being afraid to ask the questions, because remembering that they started at ground zero as well. At some point, even if we for it, you have to actually implement and learn how to do things, and everyone starts at Ground Zero. But people are so afraid of being seeing starting. Yeah, exactly. And you know, even to go back to pageantree it was my I was on my first ship and a guy who had previously served on that ship saw that same head shot that was being blown up on social media and getting cyber bullied. He saw that remembered I served on the same ship he did. He put me in contact with his sister, who was a two time Miss America and Miss Rusa winner, and he just messaged me and goes, Hey, Kelly, you don't know me, but I saw your picture. We served on the same ship. Happy to help, like another navy sailor out. Would you want to talk to my sister Erica? And I was like, well, here's something positively came out of like all of this negativity, and Erica has ended up she's coached me all for competitions all four years.

We've actually ended up having a beautiful friendship because of it. And again, like I put it, just ignored the message and been like whatever, but like, thank God people are out there lending a head, a hand, and you have to accept it, like I would be an idiot not to be, like yes, put me on a phone call with your sister, who's clearly done something right, because she was a former misslf carol on a USA. So I know I hopped to a phone call with her and just kind of wrapped her brain of everything she did, and that is what has helped me succeed in pageantry. She set me to every coach and every mentor that I needed to talk to. So people are out there as resources. You just have to be willing to follow up and he has to be willing to reach out to them. Like if you are afraid to do those things, you're not going to ever collaborate with anyone. So you mentioned that you had this like cyber bullying instance. Now, right now it seems like the more popular people get on social media, the where they're dealing with having to, you know, kind of navigate that cyber bullying. What advice would you give to somebody who is going through something like that again? The first thing would be intent, like there's nothing I post on social media that it isn't coming from a positive intent. So, like I'm trying to either celebrate someone in my life or I'm trying to share a positive message about the navy, or I'm trying to like show a different side, our personal side of the Navy, you know, or I'm mystic, whatever. I'm excited to share something that I've recently accomplished, but I never just like, O, let me boast about this or let me post a sexual picture or anything like that. And if that's what your intention is, that's great, but know that you're going to undergo negative comments all the time. So if your intention is positive, just remember that and then it's easier to ignore those comments. But as my following grows, especially on my needy account, just like over I it like took off, which is awesome, but, like you said, with any sort of following, I have about elevenzero followers on my navie account. Their comments every day from they sayers and people who pick apart my exterior, people who pick up heart my uniform, they book up about my looks, like people just literally are just like who today I'm going to attack something about it's an at all, and that's fine. Like, if that is like what you're doing with your time, all I can do is pray for you, because you, like you really need to find other hobbies. But, like, I'm still going to continue preaching me the navy and all the opportunities and, you know, talking about Miss California and my love being feminine and kind of this message, I feel like is in my heart, because that is why or how I feel most powerful and I'm not gonna let people take that power away from me. So you have to ignore I don't look at my comments that often unless they're work related. I never check my views, I never look at WHO's liked my photos, I never look at any of those things, because that as when you start kind of like picking apart who, like I can't believe up for something like my picture, like I can't believe a commented that thing or whatever, and I delete the night of comments and I blocked the people who say something really mean, like get out of here. So it's going to happen. But again, when it boils down to that, intent is something positive, then it's not going to keep you awake at night. Were you always this positive, like empowered woman, or was there ever a moment where you were like, Kelly, you gotta get this life together? Girl? Honestly, I don't think I was born like confident and inspired and empowered. I think I was just really, really lucky to have parents who encouraged me and kind of installed this confidence in me.

Is specifically my mom. She was the type of mom that, like, she just did not care what people thought and did not care what the other girls are wearing at school and would not let me be upset about people's comments because, like, I would come home you like mom, people say I'm dirty because, like I study so much, or people are telling me I can't wear make up on the track team or, you know, I'm getting made fun of because I used to like wear blazers to school because I felt more confident when I would take tests, and she'd be like, Kelly Hall, you can wear that makeup and you will run faster than all of them and you just show them how it's done. And like yeah, you're right, you're right, like I'm gonna do it. And then she'd be like you, you dress like you're interviewing for a job and you go on there and you take that test like you are like your whole career depends on it and you're gonna walk out with Your Chin Up, and I'm like, okay, Great. So I would just walk around school with my little briefcase and the biggest smile and, you know, people would make their comments, but eventually it just became Oh, like, of course Kelly is wearing that, or like that's just Kelly, you're you know, I'm dressing like Kelly Hall today, you know, and and it came something positive because I was like, I'm I'm just going to look this way, I'm just going to do my thing and it doesn't matter. So I'm really grateful that she taught me that at the young age because eventually, like now, I'm I'm still that way and I still have people like make their comments and, you know, maybe say something negative, but I'm like, you know what, I'm still going to do my thing and doesn't matter. So I try to be that person for other people who didn't have a mom that maybe was that encouraging. And when I have women who reach out to me that say like I'm being attacked for how I look, or I'm being told I shouldn't do a pageant or I'm being told I shouldn't start a business, I'm like hey, you do it. I'm here to tell you that you can and you will and you have the opportunity to do it and for people who don't know like I'll be that mentor for them. So again with a collaboration. I'm always happy to be that person for them. I was just lucky to kind of be born into a family of mentorship. So what has been, or who has been, your strongest mentor so far, other than your mom's? Oh Um, I mean, I just have mentors in every area of my life, like an I think that's what you need to do whenever you especially for me, I'm multi passionate. But so I'm not saying it wanted to have five mentors, but I probably have about five mentors because I'm model and I run a business and I'm competing and pageants and I'm in the Navy, not an overtriever at all. Yeah, but honestly, I wouldn't even say there's been like a mentor that outranks the rest. I would say, honestly, it's the naysayers who still give me the biggest push every day. Like every time I'm like like that's something I shouldn't do, I'm like wait, why? Why should I do that? Because there's people out there who agree with me that I shouldn't be doing this or that, and every time I see those negative comments or every time I'm told no like that only motivates me further to prove them yes, yes, I can do it, and yes, you can do it all and you can do both. So I'd say, at the end of the day, what motivates me the most? or The people who don't believe in me? But I'm very grateful for the people who have believed in me, because I couldn't do without them. It's amazing. So what would you say are your top two tips? Now, you've been sharing a lot of really awesome pieces about collaboration, but what would you say are your top two tips that you want people to know when it comes down to picking people that they want to collaborate with and how to continue that relationship with them once they have started working with them? Well, first I would...

...say don't be afraid to reach out, and I genuinely mean this, like people want to help you. So you know on instagram sometimes it is difficult to message someone with Twentyzero followers and say hey, I'd love to shadow you, because I promise you your one of seventy people that's telling them the same thing. So be a little humble and reach out to maybe someone who has less of a following. Just because they're done it, instagram famous person doesn't mean they're less knowledgeable. It just means that maybe they've spent more time in their career than posting on social media. So reach out to people and don't stop until you find someone who's knowledgeable in that career field. Put specifically in your area because you want to find someone who is in your city, you can get lunch with, you can get doner with, you can shadow with them. So that would be first and foremost reaching out, but second take a step back and realize you have to start somewhere. I did not get paid for a single shoot when I was shadowing brand for the first two years in San Diego. So I didn't like thirty weddings with him or something crazy. I didn't get paid for any of those times. But I mean I was having this experienced. You know subject matter x for tell me every setting I should have my camera on and everything he's using and how to shoot and how to find lighting and how to pose your clients. Like, do you know how expensive classes are on all those things? Like I basically racked his brain in from like Photography University, and he helped me with all those things. So some people think that when they're starting a business like I should get paid right away, like I can't believe you're going to make me come here for free and shoot with them, or they're asking me to model for free. Like I've done a ton of modeling sessions for free and yeah, I've got other ones where I got paid. But guess what, like, I'm only going to get better if I if I collaborate with other people, and a lot of times you're collaborating for free. So just kind of have that expectation and those partnerships and those connections sometimes will get you paid work later on. But just always have an open mind of partner with people and don't expect to get paid right away. I think that's a good point. We just recently started letting up podcasters, which is a community. Yeah, and INSTAGRAM and facebook. On facebook we have a private group that we're growing currently, but on Instagram we've made it to five, five hundred followers and like a money. And so for me, whether whether that's a good thing or not, I'm celebrating every little mildstone along the way. I used to be really bad at it. That not celebrating, that giving enough credit for like, like you said, the little things where it's like maybe we are doing things for free, but there are these like mild stones where you could see your progressive growth, even when you are thanks for free. And Luckily, you know, we highlight a podcaster a day, sorry, not a day, a week, and one of the podcasters that I just so happened to have highlighted that week reached out and was like, Hey, do you want to go speak somewhere about what you guys are doing, and I was like absolutely, like yeah, tell sign me up tomorrow. And so she started talking to everybody else because of the collaboration that we had for her coming on and doing a live video for our community, she was also able to talk to other people about what we're moving forward with. You know, those little mild stones that have along the way, and that's the best form of marketing is when other people can talk for you and say, you know, these people are starting something, there's something there, whether they're, you know, at the beginning stages right or like Kelly's this amazing model who's going to just going...

...to continue growing or you know, pageant, but she also does these, all these so it's like all these things that, in the long run, will eventually get you paid. You know, it's all about the learning and building blocks along the way. So I think it's very important, like you said, to not be afraid to ask questions and also make sure that you want or stand that collaborating most of the time is free, HMM, but with the return of the reward that eventually it won't be right. So that's actually very important. I met this other photographer a photo shoot I was modeling for and I was just so impressed by her. I was like, she's just a killer. So of course I got her instagram. Anyone I've ever impressed by always get their instagram because I'm happy to refer them to other people, but I also, you know, obviously going to reach out to them eventually. So I got her information and found out the shoot that I did, that I modeled for, she wasn't getting paid for. She was just like a friend of a friend, and was like Oh, like, that sounds fun, because it was first free tanning and her name's Jacqueline. So anyways, I ended up blending her work so much that I referred her to a bride to be who was planning a wedding the following year, and I was like hey, person, you should totally look at her photography. She ended up booking her boom right there, like paid game, and so she would later, you know, found me again on social media was like hey, thanks so much for the referral, like it's insane. I did this one photo shoot for free, I met you and you later referred me to a bride to be boom, like you know, that's where that that free work comes in and that collaboration comes in, because if you're just stuck in business and you're always just booking clients, clients, booking clients, sometimes the best people, to me are the ones that you shoot for free, because they are going to love their experience and mean more than likely to talk about it because they're like hey, I just just free shoot with Kelly. She was amazing. Look at all these photos I did, and then she'll post that to the world or share it with the world. Or sometimes paid clients or just like look in my photos. You know, they don't necessarily have that same energy about what they just did with you. So that's definitely a great point to keep in mind about kind of working for free sometimes. I think you brought up a good point too, about the energy portion of it, like we've I've noticed this, at least when it comes down to collaborating with some podcasters or, you know, doing different episodes, because this is how podcasting also grows, as well as where like one person will be on one podcast and intern they'll do another episode with that same person for their podcast. is so you like you're almost cross marketing with each other, and it's almost like you get more excitement out of collaborating with them versus just doing an episode by yourself or somebody you know, or sponsorships or whatever the case may be. I mean, obviously paid work, but it's almost like the excitement and the energy is more there for people to be like yeah, let's do this, you know, like what we can what can I do for you? How can I help you and in turn, with each other out, and so, you know, it's definitely rely that energy, that momentum that you get when you're when you're helping people. So well, people should think about collaborations like a Web, like anytime you're including more people and a project who all have their own networks who all have their own social media followings. You know, I having sense of background and event coordinating as well, and I know just, you know, order cookies from Walmart like boom, cheap ten dollars. I usually would bring in like a local bakery and say hey, like let's do quick pro quo, like if you provide this amount for this event, I'm happy to give you social media post and put business cards out. At the event. I have forty peoople come to the event who have now picked up and ate and posted about their adorable cookies, you know,...

...whereas I could have easily just gone to like a big market place and got something, you know, that's cheap. So every time you're doing that, like bringing in people, bringing in small businesses, bringing in their networks, if there's an opportunity to collaborate, always, always, shed, but people don't think about it. I don't know why, like we're all business owners here, like let's empower each other and build each other's networks. So important. Absolutely, I mean that's one of the biggest the one of it's still today to this day, right, like one of the biggest forms of marketing is word of mouth. Oh Yeah, for sure. So like we have like social media now, it's another form of word of mouth, because people will post just when they stuff. Like yes, people will post also when they're getting paid, but you can usually tell. But I feel like like I'm sponsored by a couple brands, but then I'm also not sponsored by a lot of brands. But at the end of the day, people are like wait, what are you wearing? What are you using? And I'm like I just love it, like I just think it's amazing, and so people like yeah, like that looks really great, and then they always, you know, follow up named of purchasing it, because, again, it's all about that energy you really love something. So people pick up on that for sure. Oh Yeah, so unique collaborations and making sure that you're using the right amount of energy. Right, yes, yes, for sure, it's you. Well, I want to thank you so much for coming on the show, but before we sign off, I wanted to ask you a quick question. Yes, so if tomorrow you walked out of the door and somebody told you you had ten million dollars in your bank account, what would you do with the money? Huh, my goodness, I forgot you're going to ask me this. I mean the first thing that comes to my mind is, you know, I really like the whole point of me doing Miss California is because, you know, I want to extend this message specifically to women about not just empowering them, but how to even find that power. Like we are all capable being powerful people and we all are passionate people. We just may not even realize what we're passionate about. I didn't realize that I love photography and often then later became a business owner. I would love to either start my own morning show, like my dreams to host this today show. I've always wanted to start on a morning show but use that ten million dollars, stay out there speak in front of women, kind of become a professional motivational speaker, but at the end of the day, help women feel more confident, feel more powered, and I bet the ten million dollars would help me launch that project. So if I could help just get into people's world and just shake them up and realize that they are all capable of amazing things, that would be pretty awesome. Well, I'm glad that that's what you would do, because I just with the theme of this podcast, exactually like man to billion dollars. I would be awesome. Give me a camera cruit right now. His grace, O key, it has been such a pleasure to have you on this show today. Why don't you let us know how people can get in touch with you on social media to follow you so that they can see your journey along in the navy and also on your journey to be Miss California? Thanks. I still get so excited to hear that. I hope it comes true. So my personal account is Kelly Renee Hall and my many account is lieutenant all. My photography account is Kelly Rene photography, but Ye have any questions, go for to reach out to me in my personal account, Kelly Nyehel. I'm always open to any must physic on my way. Awesome. Now, do you have anything else you want to say before we sign off? I don't think so. It's I mean, I hope people listening to this message and really take the advice seriously.

What you and I are doing is, you know, nothing difficult. It's not textbook, it's not, you know, and might lebil material. We're just normal people who collaborate with other businesses and, you know, help each other grow. So we all have that capability. So hopefully people really take this advice because there's a real potential for everyone to grow on collaboration. Absolutely well, Kelly, thanks again for coming on the show and good luck with Miss USA. I Dont Miss California, I said Miss USA. That might be the next good miss US say. Thank you so much for you to you're welcome. Thanks for tuning in to empowerment and all that podcast with your host. Read Aboutista. Want to help me grow the listener tribe. Make sure to subscribe to this podcast and follow us on instagram and facebook. Under empowerment and all that, and remember, keep it positive or don't keep it at all.

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