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Empodera Latina
Empodera Latina

Season 1, Episode · 2 years ago

Empowered by Advocacy with Lisa Maria Rhodes

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

 Lisa Maria Rhodes, Latina advocate for young immigrant community & is passionate about being involved. Licensed Master of Social Work   Graduate of the University of Miami Lived in North Carolina, Miami, Dominican Republic & New Orleans is now home Director of Alumni Mental Health Service for Collegiate Academics Mother is Colombian & Father is from North Carolina Founded the Non-profit  ALAS: Educational Access for Immigrant & Court-Involved Youth  social media: @free.alas  facebook.free.alas freealas.org Passionate about her work with the youth & immigrant community helps to educate and get under represented immigrant youth access to lawyers  what you can do to educate yourself & help others Templo Embajadores de Jesus - church providing shelter and resources to the immigrants in Tijuana, currently raising fund to help To donate please go to: https://www.gofundme.com/74eag9-refugee-relief?fbclid=IwAR2OacnXuZJbuxwvtjTE1B62s3Rza8fqYdnF_7N5EzJ3Ggg6JKJ9Z82qFMc Use of social media to push raising aid for the church in Mexico  Self love & how she finds time to unwind --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rita-bautista/message

You're listening to empowerment and all that podcast, your favorite podcast for women's empowerment, hosted by Rita Bautista. It's time to be reminded of the authority of your inner goddess and elevate the power within. Are you ready? Thank you for having me, Rita Lisas. So, in the middle of all of this busyness that you do in helping the community, I mean what inspired you? Like you know, what inspires you to continue doing all of this and to like really just being so engolved in helping everyone? Wow. Well, my first inspiration is always my students, because they are amazing individuals that are like, on a daily basis, conquering new strategies and learning about themselves. Working with high schoolers, it's like I learned more than they do every day potentially, and so I'm really inspired by that. But I'm also really inspired by my faith. I mean, I really believe that all humans are created in God's image, which makes everyone brothers and sisters. So when there's injustice and when people don't have access to power and opportunity, then breaks my heart and there's like we have a long way to go and order for everyone to achieve liberation. Wow, that is that is very, very powerful. Where are you from originally? Where your parents from? Yeah, well, I grew up in North Carolina and my mom came to the US from Columbia shortly before I was born. So I was born here in the US and then my trajectory has given me strong affiliation to some different places. My father's by side of the family is from North Carolina, and then I went to school at the University of Miami, also known as the you very proud of that, and started my career in education in Miami and then moved to the Dominican Republic, where I was teaching High School in Santo Domingo. And from Dominican Republic I moved to New Orleans ten years ago. So New Orleans is definitely home now and forever as far as I'm concerned. But I do go back often to Columbia and also to North Carolina to visit my family, of course. And who would you say has been a big like a mentor for you in in all of your journey when it comes down to social work and also just like career development? Well, I'm a first and foremost, always had to say my mom. We have different life paths and different experiences, but her go get, her attitude and like won't take no for an answer and maybe she if she doesn't know a system, she'll figure it out. That resourcefulness and like willingness to put herself out there and ask questions and take risks.

It's something that she might regret, the degree to which is passed on to me, because I'm quite a ristaker. But truthfully she has really taught me and it's really been amazing, as I get older, to watch her and her process of learning and growing across her life, and that's like really motivating and inspiring to me her own story and I could also say like on a professional side, I've been blessed to have people who have poured into me and just being open to hearing people's recommendations and being open opportunities has been it's been a huge blessing and it's something that I seek to do and seek to give back to those who are around me as well. Oh, that's so sweet. Yeah, I can attest to the LETTINA mother, who make sure that you don't take no for an answer mind still to this day believes that I can conquer everything, even if I don't think I can see just for some reason, things we're all born with this like amazing will power. So I love that your mom is like she doesn't take no far an answer. If she has a goal, she's going to reach it, she's going to figure it out, and so that's a spirit that I think a lot of immigrants bring with them to the US and in culcate to their children and honestly, it's a gift and it's a strength that not everybody has, and those are some of the overlooked pieces that I think we might not talk about that in terms of a skill set, but when you have a mindset of I will accomplish my goals, it is like I'll do anything necessary because I have clarity around the why, then that's a gift. It's a huge gift. Absolutely I don't think that there's anything my mother thinks that I can't do. Like he's like no, you're gonna do this because you have no choice one. If we made it here, you can do it too. Like I'm just like yeah, I agree with you one hundred percent. Like are there's no mentor, like they're like being a mom, like that's right. So, yeah, so, okay. So I saw the other day you were posting these videos of yourself going over the border to go help out families that were immigrant families that were trying to make their way up here, and they were basically being sheltered by was it a church or yeah, tell me a little bit about that experience, because one, I'm my heart was like pounding when I saw you doing that and I was just like, Oh my God, one is it saith and to like you pull human being for even doing that. So please tell us a little bit about what was going on, how you got yourself involved and yeah, but Oh sure, and I'm really glad that you brought this up in your named a few things that I've heard a lot of people ask me about, because there is a narrative that's formed, and the narrative is formed by those who are in power, by those...

...who are in control, and that narrative says this is dangerous, this is scary, and it's not true. And I'm not saying that there's not danger associated, but there there's danger here in New Orleans, there's danger everyone in the US and everywhere in the world, and so I think that is like a narrative of fear that's been pushed out in order to divide us and I just want to address it head on and kind of demistify it. Like this wasn't any big orchestrated plan. I actually had a conference in San Diego sponsored by the Kellog Community Leadership Network, and I was like well, if I'm already going to be in San Diego, that's only fourteen miles from the border to the Juana. I'm a high school social worker. I've been supporting immigrant youth in New Orleans for the last ten years and many of my students came here on a company to the US seeking asylum and current that's what the nonprofit unless works on. Yeah, them, that's part of it and we can talk about that in a moment. But I honestly wanted to go and learn and just see what was going on, and so I just literally put a facebook post out like three weeks ago. So does anybody know anybody doing great work in Sijuana with people who are seeking asylum in the US? And somebody wrote back and said, yeah, there's this church called emplom Bahlo Deza Hissus. The pastor's name is Sila. I got excited because it was a woman passed. There are what's gears are fun? Here's her phone number. It's not called Sida, and she's like, you know, who are you, and rightly so, and just let her know, like I'd like to come and help in whatever way I can. Turn out they had a medical team there and it would be of assistance to them to have an interpreter. So Great. I literally just walked across the border on the pedestrian bridge, which it seems like this big deal, right, but if you think about it, for you to go fourteen miles from your house, wherever you live, is that a big deal now? So it's the same thing. Like we it's one piece of land that used to be Mexico and now it's the US. Oh, I'm currently so I totally know that there. You know. Yeah, and so, okay, walk across, get a taxi give them the address, show up at this place and sure enough, it's a church that has a shelter and I had a real like God moment right when I got there because the person who opened the door used to go to my church in the Dominican Republic. He was a refuge in the Dominican Republic from Haiti and now has traveled with a group of Haitians from Chile all the way up through South America, Central America, and he opened the door and I was like wait a minute, and he knew me and I know him. It was it was like wow, a real affirmation that this is where I was a pupposed to be at that moment. Yeah, and honestly, I was...

...going to learn, I wanted to contribute and whatever way I could. But while I was there interpreting for the medical team the people who are telling their stories of having lost family members on the way, having lost children on the way, and six children who like because the mothers were suffering from malnutrition, it couldn't produce enough breath melt to feed their babies, and so just a dire situation, and I was like, Oh, I can hear, to learn, but that's not why God had any like I need to do something about this, and not that I alone could do much, but together with the power of the community, we can do so much. Like you can just be an ordinary person like me, like you, like anyone, and bring together a bunch of other ordinary people and make a big difference. And I'm really inspired by everybody who has pitched in. So I just literally made a go fund me, posted on Facebook at night share the story that I just shared with you, and so far we received six thousand and five dollars and do name my guys. It's still open and active. And so then after the conference, I just extended my flights and I wanted to mystify that too, because that sounds like, Oh, who has money to extend a flight now? I mean, I'm starting in on profit, but it was on southwest. I just logged in and there's no change fee, so just changed it. So I just want to make this like easy inaccessible for anyone listening, like you can do something great with whatever you have. And so then I went said, I'm sorry, go ahead, oh it's okay. So then I went back after the conference the following weekend and we went grocery shopping because, and like what's important here is to center the people who were in the shelter and the people who are running the shelter, because they're the ones who are there every day. They know what they need, they know what works well with diets, they know like it's just so important not to say, like, Oh, okay, I'll go go shopping and give this. I don't know the right things to pick out like. I don't want to assume and fortunately the pastors she had already gone to all the local stores and she knew, well, you can get twice amount of chicken for that price at this store. So we went to three different stores, got a bunch of food and now the next step is so that people can donate. We're setting up paypal for them so that they can have a link and anybody can donate anytime so that it doesn't have to be centralized through, you know, any other person. So that's awesome. I want you to share that link with me so that any of the listeners who may be interested in donating some funds to the church down in Tijuana they're able to. And you know what, Sigh, that is an example of a person, an ordinary person, doing extraordinary things because they three years ago Meta family who had no shelter, invited them to stay on the floor in their church and then three months...

...later had five hundred and twenty five people there and they don't have, like you know, the business plan in the funding and the everything ready. They are literally just loving their neighbor and figuring it out together with their church, community selling the things they have to provide for people who they don't know. It's just like you can, you could do extraordinary things, no matter who you are or where you are. You just have to want to do it. Yeah, no, absolutely, Lisa. When you were down there, did you see any more community helping them, or is it like they were just like the mentor the the center point in that area for, you know, immigrants that are traveling up through better know there's several different shelters and I think they're working together, like amongst the shelters, to try to house and trouble shoe and make sure that different populations get the care that they need. It seems pretty grass roots and like people who care just saying hey, let's call meet on Tuesday and figure this out, you know. Yeah, and also say that has told me a little bit about help from other people who have wanted to donate water and don't food, and so it seems like people are coming together. They might not be in the news or highlighted for it, but people are taking care of people. Yes, you know what's great that we hear this story of this type of mobilization, because it seems as though even the Hispanic community now is trying to join in on the negativity and saying that these people are not being taken care of or the things are going on that are that, you know, aren't necessarily positive. So it's great to hear that the community is definitely coming together to help these the immigrants that are trying to make their way here. Now, I do want to point out they are not US order facilities at all. This is just a person, so I can't speak on that. I have not visited one and I too have seen the news. That is horrific and problematic. Yeah, and I can't underscore how dire the situation is. Like, wow, there are people on the ground who care. They don't necessarily have all the resources to provide for all the people that they are providing for, and so I do think that there's an opportunity here, especially for those of us who are in the US, especially because the dollar goes farther once it's converted to a bed, so to be able to support financially the people who are actually supporting with their time and their structures and providing physical shelter. Wow, wow, you really are inspiring me to want to go over there. I mean it's it's just so, you know, it's interesting. My parents being hunder and like they came to this country thirty years ago. I couldn't imagine how they not have came here the way that they did back then. You know, US actually going through something like this, like it's just very, very selfless act...

...of yours to do something that that awesome to help these people. I mean, I can't tell you how thankful I am that you were able to share that story. And it's interesting the power social media as well that, you know, we could literally watch and experience what you are experiencing while you're going shopping, while you're walking over the border, while you're, you know, and for people who don't have eyes and ears down there to see somebody who's the PIP, you know, a pillar of community engagement in New Orleans, to watch you do that, it's just it was so inspiring, you know, like it's like what am I doing with my life right now? That can be more, you know, what can I do be more for the community as well? So I thank you again for that. That's just so selfless and that's an amazing act that you did. Wow, thanks, but that's not all. It's think we have have any different gifts and talents. So you know, the analogy of like many parts one body. Everybody has different ways that they can fit in, and so it's about looking to ourselves to say, Hey, what am I called to do in the situation or what do I have to offer? And we all have something. It might not be, you know, maybe we don't have money to offer, but we have time or maybe we can make phone calls, maybe we work more on the policy side. Like there are different needs of cross the spectrum and everybody can put in. Speaking policy for a second, what do you feel is one of the most challenging things that they're facing as far as policy is concerned, around these these children that are coming to the states right now? Well, a clear path of citizenship is a really challenging issue and I can give you some information actually on that side. In terms, if we just look at like I, as you mentioned, I work in collegiate academies on the Director of alumni mental health services. I've been a social worker there and a teacher there over the last nine years. And when we look at our high school graduates overall, seventy four percent continue to hire education. When we take out students who are in documented. Zero percent continue to hire education and we have to change that. And so like that, that jarred me a couple of years ago and that is the Genesis for the nonprofit. I least so I less. is a program that has been an operation over the last four years in collegiate academy schools. Now we're up to five schools and right now we're converting into a nonprofits so that we can serve more schools and more students. And when you look at you know, if you get charged with a crime in the United States and you go to court, you get a public defender. If you have immigration court, there's no public defender. So when my students go to court without a public defender, they don't have fifteen thousand to twenty thousand dollars to pay an immigration attorney. That means they represent themselves. So we're talking about miners who don't have English as their first language...

...in court representing themselves. I have a master's degree and I've been in court a lot and I wouldn't feel comfortable doing now. And so the outcome is that only eight percent actually get permanent residency when they're representing themselves. The outcome if they have an attorney is eighty eight percent. So this is like eighty percent difference. It kind of makes or breaks the case. And so that's one policy issue. Is Having Public Defense in Immigration Court would be a stepping stone to create access towards pathway to citizenship. That's a second one, having clear pathways a citizenship. A lot of times people don't know much about immigration and they say like, why don't they just do it the right way? Why don't they just get in line? There's not a line. Actually, people who are coming here from other countries, who are speaking asylum, are acting according to the law, like you're allowed to come into the United States if you're seeking asylum and you file for that. And so what's happening now is actually that we are not upholding what our laws already say and we're barring people and then treating them in less than humane ways, to put it, to put it as nicely as possible. But so the goal for allast is actually to connect students with a sturneys so that they have representation in core and they can have access to permanent residency, which then grants so on another policy tip. If you think situation. If you're in a state that doesn't offer in state tuition to students who are undocumented, that means they have to pay out a state tuition and they don't qualify her federal financial aid. So that's more of the angle that I'm working on directly is looking at how do we get gets permanent residency so they can access that and on the policy side, what that might look like is creating in state tuition for graduates of high school from any given state, regardless of immigration status. And the other piece would be creating in state aid, as some states have done, like Texas, has the TAFFSA, like Fassa. So so are some examples of how policy could move forward access to opportunity, both for citizenship and for education. Yeah, you know, I think what's interesting is, you know, these kids actually want to do part of society. Right, if you're going that far as to I want to go to college, I want to be part of this community and be a positive influence, you would think that it would be a no brainer for people to want to be able to help these kids become part of society in a legal way, but it becomes such a challenge for them. Absolutely and we have to look at the narrative too, because there's some narrative that's used to divide us, to say, well, these people are worthy and these people aren't. That's actually not the value of human dignity...

...doesn't come from what we do, but rather who we are. And if you're a person of faith, I'm strong follower of Jesus, that's a very clear teaching is that people's value comes from them being created, not from what they do, and so I encourage people to examine those narratives so that we're actually looking at what does it mean to be a place where we believe in happiness ideals that we talked about, but how do we include everyone in those set of exclude people as are as we've seen multiple times throughout history. Yeah, no, I completely agree a hundred percent with you. I think what's been so dangerous about this administration has been the narrative that they've created around these people that are coming here to this country. You know, yeah, and honestly, it's very scared. hystorically this has been true too, because we don't I love President Obama for many reasons, but on immigration Obama was a chief deporter. More people were deported under President of Commons in any other president. And so I think one thing that is happening right now is because our current president has said so many terrible things and done so many terrible things, people are angry and people are aware that there's a problem. Before this time there was still a problem there and there was less awareness and there was less mobilization to action, and so I think what we have to do is get familiar, like in each community, find out who's in affiliate of the National Day Labor organizing network, and New Orleans that's the Congressilla another it was the kind of day labors, and different states and different communities they'll have different names under that, but just to actually find out there are people who work on this twenty four hour senti s a week, three hundred and sixty five days a year, and that's one really good starting point to getting involved is going to those groups and saying, how can I help? Yeah, that's such a great idea. I feel like you're like inspiring me to mobilize do it. I've done a long time and now I'm like go and fired today, because you really have given such amazing gems and knowledge about you know, things that we can be doing in general. You know, like what access do I have? Can I be connecting people to? You know, just some things that are just so simple as getting on the phone and calling people and finding out more information. Is So it's so important right and you know what, right now, at a time when the president announced these a deportation initiative, it's a time to get trained on rapid response to ICE. So if you're somebody who does have perminent residency or citizenship, who's not living in fear and WHO's not at risk of deportation, you can just go to a training to learn how you support our brothers and sisters who are living in this reality.

And that's so simple. It could be that, like you get a text alert and some something's happening in your area and you go and you film it, but your trained, like what's the proper way to do that, so that you're not exposing yourself to any danger a harm and so that you are capturing anything that could be used in order to support the person who is being targeted. So, you know, just googling like rapid response training. There's one coming up in New Orleans in the next couple of weeks. And this is being organized across the country organizations like me, Hent, they and united. We dream our organizations that do this work year around, so we can look to them for information on narrative. Like we don't share articles to create panics, for example. We actually share action steps, you know. So there's there's levels of this and it doesn't matter. Yeah, what point anyone enters. My charge to people is see what you have to offer and then enter together with the community that's near you that's already acting on this. Such a powerful call to action. Yeah, that that. Thank you for giving the information on these places to find, you know, just different ways. And you know, you touched on something that I I personally view myself, which is like sharing articles, and it's not necessarily that you're trying to create panic, but really more educate the public on what's going on. But I think you're absolutely right. Instead of sharing those just like more talking about things that they can actually do to assist, versus scaring everybody into, you know, forensic panic about what's going on with immigration. Right, and I mean the impacts are real. I have a student who, as soon as that announcement came out, he quit his job and he called me and talk to me about it and staid like I'm not going to be at risk of going to work. But that's what happens, is that everyday people who are working hard to get their education and to work, who are paying taxes, are then paralyzed out of fear and families are separated. I mean we are all part of some sort of family unit, whether that's created or born, and that's just an essential basis of our existence is being able to be with the people who we love. And so, yeah, yeah, it's just they're trying times, definitely, but there's a lot that we can do to support each other. Definitely, definitely. So I want to know. You're starting a nonprofit. That's right. Biggest challenges that you've been facing so far as a creator? Have you heard of imposter syndrome? So it's so interesting because people around me have been pushing me to do this for a long time and I wasn't ready. I wasn't ready. It took time for some experiences...

...to come up for me to be in a place to say now I'm ready, and I'm realizing how much of that has been centered and just the beliefs that I could which, if you know me. For people who do know me, people would call me confident, like people wouldn't say, Oh, she has in securities around this, they would never guess that. But even people who come off as the most confident may still have insecurities about making changes, about potential roles, being different, ability to influence, like these are big and scary things that can be, but they don't have to be. And that's what I'm learning. It's like every day I am sitting down to do something never done before, don't really know how to do and I'm and I'm figuring it out, but not by myself. It's honestly drawing on the power of community. Like what I do know how to do is support students, and what I do know how to do is train other educators how they can support their students so that they get this access to education and permanent residency. What I'm learning is how to start an organization, and that'sn't imidating, you know, fund raising by law, selecting a board, those are some initial steps that I've never done that before and and so I think just recognizing that that, like you don't have to have it together, you don't have to have all the answers. You have to be willing to ask, you have to be willing to learn and to grow, and if you have that, then you know one other point that is like essential to this. I hear a lot of people kind of grilling me, like why are you starting something? We already have a lot of non profits, and I appreciate that, because it's easy to duplicate services and we see that happening instead of work together and so actually vetting. In this case, this is like a response to a need. So working in the schools, seeing a few needs that are unmet, creating a solution together with families and students and attorneys and the legal community, and now expanding it. It's actually born out of something. It didn't exist. So I do think that's like the number one recipe, after believing in yourself, is working together to make sure that what you're doing is being done in the way that is for and with the people. Yeah, Whoo, that sounds very challenging but extremely powerful to say that. You know, you're basically like starting something from nothing. You saw that there was a problem, you work with the community and now you're moving from a word with your confidence and the processing, but everything together is helping you push forward and you know, it sounds like you're starting off on a really great in...

...a really great place. Different days feel different, honestly, it's overall, yes, that's a that's a pretty boat to put on it. I like it. So, while you're doing all this, though, you know, working and you're starting a nonprofit and you're hoping other plate other communities as well, how do you find time to take care of yourself? This is something I struggled with over time. I think most educators and public education can attest to how hard it can be, especially when you're pouring out. Your Cup sometimes runs low, and for me, filling up my cup has first to do it my faith, and that's what case me grounded in terms of like belief and humanity, belief in the value of every person, belief in my own value, even despite things that might occur that are negative, and then just creating a schedule, which I don't like schedules, but with boundaries in like really holding yourself to sleeping enough exercise. I love to dance. Like my brain, it's always moving, but when I danced it finally turns off and I can just like live on the dance floor and not be thinking about anything, and so I had to plan to make sure I'm dancing enough, to make sure, like eating healthy can be hard when you're on the go all the time, making sure we drink enough water. I'm not an expert at all of these things at any given time. I would say at any given time maybe I'm juggling a few of those things well and then have a few others to work on. Yeah, that happens. Still a lot we try so hard sometimes to do, and I've been realizing like being a woman sometimes gives you already like a whole bunch of checklists, right your hair, you make up, your this, your that, your clothes, you shoot, like all this stuff, and then, on top of that, you have to eat healthy, you have to hydrate, you have to make sure that you're taking time out for yourself. So, yeah, don't worry, we're all there with you. Yeah, and just so return to like how am I going to be able to keep doing this and to sustain myself? Well, I have to be grounded, and I mean this seem like really easy things and obvious things, but are we doing that? Like whenever I noticed that I'm at a breaking point I have a bad attitude with somebody, I can pretty much always look back and say, Oh yeah, I wasn't sleeping that much those days, or I haven't been exercising at all, you know. So like there's a correlation to our productivity, our effectiveness, our happiness and well being, to taking care of ourselves. And it seems basic, but it can be hard to prioritize. Oh Yeah, especially with everything you're doing. I can't imagine. So let me ask you a question.

So you said that your mother is like one of your mentors, and then the person who also helped you find your way into social work. But who is like somebody that you look up to, a hero or hero, or somebody that you continue to find motivation from? Who, I have to say, my students. I mean to be in the US negotiating a second language, or students learning a whole new system, and to have come from an experience of trauma that was the reason for coming to the US, and then come on a journey that incurred more trauma and then based trauma here, and then wake up every day and come to school and, you know, show up, however they show up, whether they have a big smile on their face or whether they're said today, just being and pushing forward is so inspiring to me. I was born in the US. I have so much privilege that I take for granted and it's easy to forget that it is. But when I look at my students and they're acting me, hey, I got nine out of ten on my test. I need to figure out why I didn't get it this other one, I'm like yeah, get it like that inspires me to do better. When I see my students reach out to each other, when they go through things and support one another, it is inspiring. Is it's like the human spirit is amazing and my students are my constant heroes and inspiration. Oh that's so beautiful. I had a student who her favorite author's Nicholas Barks, and one of my family members was able to get books on by Nicholas Barks for her and so, anyway, for her birthday, when she got that, she was like this is the best birthday president I ever gotten and I just thought, like, how's that for a narrative on today's youth? Like the best gift ever is a book signed by my favorite author. That's what we're talking about. We're talking about like amazing kids who are excited to learn, excited to grow and deserve every opportunity to be in their full potential. HMM, yeah, now I totally agree with you. And if only we could continue to paint that positive picture of these children, hopefully people can actually see that. You know, they really just all want the same exact thing, you know, and if that playing field was leveled for everyone and we would be able to give them that access, in that opportunity to education, so that all they have to do is Act Lee be kids. That's right, the same things that you and I want for ourselves, for our family members. Just that's right. So, Lisa, is there anything else you want to tell everyone who's listening, something that you...

...feel that we might have left out that is important for you to get across to anybody who's listening today. I think we have a lot of untapped brilliance and power and potential and for those who are listening, if there's an idea you have or if you already have a solution that you're working on, are a part of a community that's doing something great, don't be scared to take it to the next level. I mean there are so much need and there's also so much creative genius in our own community. It's time for us to encourage each other, to leverage it, to bring it out and, like we are, our own solution. It has to come from within, and so don't hold back. That's how would like to end on that. See, it'sip with that is sea sip with Lisa. It has been such a pleasure to talk to you today and all these little gems of knowledge that you drop today are they're just still great and it's definitely just kind of like a reflection of the person that you are and everything that you're doing for the community. We I genuinely thank you for all that you're doing and if anybody's interested in finding out more information or getting in contact with Wese, that a helper with alas, or if you want to donate any money to the church down and Ijuana, I'm going to go ahead and publish those links on my website. Empowerment and all Thatcom if you click on the icon, you'll be able to see all the information and the show notes and you can access Lisa if you need if you want to help. Well, thank you, and anyone can always follow our instagram or facebook the handle is the at. Find that, Arrolla, free that, alas, free that, alas, and on. There you can find what's going on next and always send a message if you're interested and getting in bold sounds great. Thank you again, Lisa. You have a great afternoon and a great week. Thank you, rata. Thank you for providing a space, and I'm encouraged by the work you're doing. Oh, thank you so much. All right, all right, Adios. By thanks for tuning in to empowerment and all that podcast with your host, read a Futista. Want to help me grow the listener tribe. Make sure to subscribe to this podcast and follow us on instagram and facebook. Under empowerment and all that, and remember, keep it positive, or don't keep it at all.

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