Sounder SIGN UP FOR FREE
Empodera Latina
Empodera Latina

Season 2, Episode · 1 year ago

Challenging the Status Quo with Dr. Corrine Devin

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

What if I told you that Ms. International 2020 doubled a US Navy Commander and an Orthodontist? Would you believe that she has learned to successfully challenge the status quo? On this episode of Empowerment and All That, Dr. Corinne Devin joins us to tell all about how she lives between crown, scrubs and stiletos.  Join the  Empowerment and All That EMPOWERED circle and become a donor and patron of this podcast: https://patreon.com/empowermentandallthat This episode was dedicated in memory of George Floyd, and all those who have lost their lives to police brutality. In order to join the fight against injustice and to further the conversation about #blacklivesmatter, here are the links mentioned in the show:  George Floyd Memorial Fund: https://www.gofundme.com/f/georgefloyd Minnesota Freedom Fund: https://minnesotafreedomfund.org/ Black Visions Collective: https://www.blackvisionsmn.org/ Campaign Zero: https://www.joincampaignzero.org/ Black Lives Matter: https://www.Blacklivesmatter.com Minneapolis NAACP: https://www.paypal.me/mplsnaacp4050B Text “Floyd” to 55156 to sign a petition for justice for George Floyd --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rita-bautista/message

We are podcasters united to condemn the tragic murders of George Floyd and Brianna Taylor and many others at the hands of the police. This is a continuation of systemic racism pervasive in our country since its inception, and we are committed to stand against violence in all its forms. We believe to be silent is to be complacent. We believe that black lives matter. We believe that black lives are more important than property. We believe that we have a responsibility to use our platforms to speak out against this injustice whenever and wherever we are witnessed to it. In creating digital media, we have built audiences that return to hear our voices, and we will use our voices to speak up against anti blackness and police brutality, and we encourage our audiences to be educated, engaged and to take action. In case you're interested, here are a couple of ways you can participate. Baking a change. Can Donate through the George Floyd Fund, Minnesota Freedom Fund, black visions collective campaign, Zero Black Lives Matter Minneapolis and double ACP, or sign a petition by texting the word Floyd to five, five, one, five, six you can find these websites on our show notes. Anywhere that you're listening to this podcast, you are listening to empowerment in all that podcast. You more favorite podcast for women's empowerment, hosted by RIED ABOUTISTA. It's time to be reminded of the authority of your inner goddess and elevate the power within. Are you ready? Welcome back to another episode of empowerment and all that podcast. I'm your host, Street Aboutista, and today I'm really excited to have doctor Karen Devon, and Orthodontis in the navy and also commander, who is joining us today to talk about her core values, specifically drive, and how a beautiful woman in the military also becomes this galaxy. Thank you, guys, for joining me. So I wanted...

...to give you guys a little bit of an update on what I've been up to. Six thousand downloads over thirty two countries and forty states in the US of people that have been listening to the podcast, and this is all happened because of you, guys. Thank you so much for the support. A lot of you have been asking me how you can actually continue to get involved. Well, I wanted to tell you that I developed a patreon page, so you can go to Patreoncom, so with empowerment and all that, and join the membership for the podcast. And what this membership includes is behind the scenes footage for the podcast episodes that you love and a once a month empowerment circle call, and in that call I'll have you guys, talk to me, give me, ask me questions about the PODCAST, ask me questions about life in general, and you'll be surrounded with other women who also have that drive to listen to the podcasts and relate to the episodes that we're sharing throughout empowerment and all that. So I wanted to give you guys a big shout out, tell you thank you so much for the continued support and love and let you all know that I'm listening to you, I'm here for you, and don't forget to follow us on Instagram at empowerment and all that. All right, so now I'm going to introduce my guest. Thank you, Dr Karin Deven it's such a pleasure to have you here today. Well, thank you so much for having me, Rita. I love it that we are able to connect oceans apart, considents, countries apart. It really shows you. No matter if the world is a pandemic, we still can empower even on zoom and over a phone call. So thank you. It's truly honored to be on your podcast. No problem, you, guys. I wanted to let y'all know. So, like Karen, actually listens to the podcast. How cool is that? She's already told me all of her favorite episodes, and it's always exciting. I don't want you guys to think that I ever get too far from the listeners and also, as you can see, bring them on to the show as well. You might be a lucky guest...

...on the show one day. On empowerment and all that. Yeah, keep listening, so, Karin, tell me. Well, let everybody know. Where are you joining us from today? I am actually joining you from Katanya, Italy, Sicily, so the little island off the boots is where I'm hailing from, and I'm about seven hours ahead, so I am calling you from the future. Tell us what the future looks like. Are we out of this pandemic already? Well, I have to probably say here in Sicily, this weekend was the first weekend where we were able to venture out a little bit. Of course, it's with social distancing. It's wearing masks. I did a couple hikes with my friends. Yesterday we went to this city that's about an hour way called Mulat Soo, and we went down to this area called the pool of Venus and it was absolutely majestic. So here it is, an inclave a water surrounded by volcanic stone rocks that created a separate pool from the ocean and it was just nice to be out and about. Yes, we kept your distance from people and we wore masks what we needed to, but it just felt like we could all just sit back and breathe. It was my first time having a GELATTO and probably about four months, so that was pretty amazing because definitely can't have that every single day. Oh yeah, I, yes, I know. I've had ice cream in my refrigerator, but I made sure to get those little tiny like cones the like. I can have one a day as well as it's this small, yes, and then. Yeah, but yeah, I know things are starting to open up. I'm starting to see patients back at the hospital. I do look like the lunch lady. So if anyone asked her, yes, I'm in the military. I'm in the United States. Navy and these are just my bus. These are not the department offense us, just to put that out there. But it's fantastic. I've missed seen my patients. It's been four months. Our quarantine started march tonight, so we had a very long ruling time of where we couldn't go out for walk unless we're walking to our car to go to work, which for me, I worked every other day at a hospital. So but I am just grateful for how caring people are...

...in here Italy, the tenacty, the resilience of the people, and I really look forward letting people get back open and let giving your economy back here in a country that is truly made me feel like home. Wow. Well, thank you so much for your service, and I know that people say that genuinely, but the thing is, is today's Memorial Day, right. We're recording on Memorial Day. I know it's so cool. So Happy Memorial Day to everyone back in the US. It's I it's thank you for the compliments and also think my patience. They catch my bullets, so they're just as awesome too. Okay, so let me ask you this. In your future and your present sense, you are your doctor your or an orthodontist and you're also this pageant queen. Right. You want Miss Galaxy, which is wow. Yes, I went this galaxy in two thousand and fourteen and I'm Miss International. So currently. So, yes, Juggling to opposite world's wow. Wow. And so for everybody who's joined us, right, we've had another person who also participated in pageants and was in the military, and it just seems like such a huge two different lives. It's almost like you're superwoman, right, like you're living as a a doctor in the daytime and then at night you like put on these ball gowns and you dress up and it's like beautiful pageantry, right, like how does one balance between those two lives? Well, I will tell you you're asking a great question because, yes, I am going from scrubs to stilettos and two opposite rules. But what I will tell you is balance for me starts at thirty in the morning. That's when I get a workout in and I go to the gym and I train hard, and I will tell you, training for Simsuit is a lot harder than any military physical fitness test. I do I'm in better shape for pageants that I am the twice a year that I run my blea half do a gazillion steps and push ups. So that's one thing that pageantry has trained me for and, let's be honest, in the military it's our job to be in great physical shape. A few other things. That where I can definitely tell you where pageantry and the militarire so similar, is there's a huge...

...sense of camaraderie. You know, in the military we hear how you don't leave anyone behind, that you look out for your shipmate, you take care of people that are strangers, but because the military you treat them like family. I've had that experience of pagets. My very first pageant that I won, I was sent to Irack on the deployment and every single girl, including the girl that was the first runner up, who I only knew for just two days, set me and my entire gental team care packages and Iraq. I mean to find a hobby where women will open up their hearts their homes in the same way that I've had in the military. I find is such a where gem. And the other thing is service. I mean they're all about community service and the military that's what we do we do human a terry missions, we go to areas where community service. Here in Italy I work with public affairs and we go to schools where we do poenips. Even right now I am teaching kids, be assumed, how to take care of her teeth or what good foods to eat, just because they've all been at home, stuck at home without teachers, live teachers, except on zoom, for the last three or four months. So there's a lot of crossover between tradition, service camaraderie that people kind of forget. But would you appeel the layers of the pageants and the GLITZ and the glad, we'll actually will see some remarkable drier than woman underneath that. I absolutely love that. I mean that's obviously with you being the second person who's been in this position on the show. It goes to show you like it's not just women who are walking around parading, and so the letters on a stage right. You literally have a hardcore background of you are educated, you are out here serving the world and giving yourself selflessly to the military as well. So it's like you're you have a fullblown person on the other side of just the crown and not that the crown isn't enough, right, because anything that a woman decides to do is enough. But I think people have this false narrative in their head of like somebody who's just not who's maybe just like areheaded, or some somebody who just...

...all they worry about is the vanity portion of it, and it's no, there's there's just such a whole another side to all of you that I think is beautiful and I'm really excited that I've gotten a chance to showcase that on the show. Well, thank you. I really do a pre shake that and you know, I don't disagree with you. You know, there is, you know, I think in every industry and every hobby there is definitely, you know, the few apples that fall or fall for from the tree. I mean we all can say, you know, we look at elite athletes where their college or some of them are just full themselves, and then there's others that will laid themselves down for their team and for me with one of the best things about pageant is just the woman I've met. I mean even right now here in Europe, I've got a director who is her husband's a foreign service officer in Switzerland and I've got a sister queen is Croatia. So we've all been going through this pandemic together, helping each other out, setting each other things just to kind of help us survive, because as Americans in a foreign country, there's just certain things that are just they don't come to US easily. We don't speak the native language fully. It speak. So I'm Italian, but I'm in Sicily, so they speak to silly. So just so you all know, that is a very different language. But yeah, I just I for me, that's what's kept me doing it and it's what we'll keep continuing to doing it. So for sure, that's awesome it. So one of the things that I keep hearing in your voice is just like this foundational passion right, everything that you're saying, the way that you're delivering everything, it just sounds like you're full of passion and you just are really excited about everything that you put your heart too. I'm curious where was this born? Where was this foundation of passion born? And you I would have to say there's a couple areas, but one of the areas, at least for my passion to go into dentistry, started when I was twenty. My father was a navy dennist. So just full disclosure, I know I drink the cool late, but I didn't want to drink the cool late. So I never dreamed that when I was eight years old that twenty years later I'd be go into the same place in the world, that I would follow in this footsteps. But I remembered volunteering with him and we went to...

...these elementary schools that were that had a lot of reduced to be lunches, where the kids just couldn't get good town of care. And there was this one time we were on the van and this eight year a goold walks in and she's nervous, she's traveling, she can't open her mouth and when she finally does, we see that her first permanent molars, the teeth that she should have for the rest of her adult life, for rotten down to the boat on and I just couldn't believe that. I was like this, she's eight, I'm not in an undeveloped country, I'm not in a war zone, I am in my hometown and this poor kid, she can't eat all the foods as Adele Twenty eight, but we know we should it. She can't laugh and just live a care free life, and that's where we where some of my drive started. That I'm like, I want to be a dentist. I this is not going to happen in on my watch. And so that's just like one example of things in life that that's happened to me. Pageants kind of came about a little bit later. Not to go into too many stories, but when I was in donal school, my second year donal school, the miss us a pageant was on and the second run up that year was a donal student and one of my friends was tell me about you kidding me? I'm five foot three. Those girls look like victory secret models. And before she even finishes a story, a guy behind me says, oh, Kuran could never do that. I dare her that she could do better and I just turned around and said watch me. So here I am, at twenty four years old, airing my first passion against all these women who've been doing it since they were three years old. I didn't know what it interview meant. I didn't know what it meant to be judged in a swimsuit or even down or answer questions like world piece, which, honestly, and my profession, that would be awesome because I would have them all my people's deploy on me or leave me like in an older treatment. But yeah, I I did it in my first year. I got first runner up and then I just fell in love with the world. That I never dreamed I still be doing today. So those are some of the areas.

You could say some of my passion has come from unlikely sources, for sure. That's that is interesting, right, because for most people passion does come from the place where they didn't expect it to come from, right, your dad, who is a person who was in the military, who brings you into this world and you didn't expect to be in there and then all of a sudden it's now you're in the military. Now you follow your passion of Dentistry through the military, and then the pageantry portion of it develops from someone who challenged you in the military. Oh No, he was in the military. This is dadal school. Now he was in the military. Yeah, that's okay, now denal school with yeah, I didn't go into the navy till after dental school. I was on a scholar show the navy in deental school. Yeah, right, but yeah, it's I does definitely challenged by the status quote. You can't do this and I for me, that was all the motivation I need just to to do it. So for sure. So I want to know a little bit more about this challenge of the status quo. Where do you think you've gotten that the most in your life? When I was growing up, I was called for Rice. I had those thick bottle top glasses, you know, where your eyes look like. There are a thousand times in large. I had things that went to the back of my head. I was very small in stature and I was a military Brat, which meant that we moved every two or three years. So it was really, really hard in a sense growing up that as soon as I felt like a place was becoming home, I was kept making friends, we would move and it was usually with very little nose and I didn't really know where we're going until we got there. For me, that is kind of worth challenging. The status quote. For me started because I had to learn at a very young age to really stick up for myself and also to be very selfsufficient independent. My parents raised my brother died, that no matter where in the world you are, you need to make the most of it, but also not to be afraid of who you are. And and I'm making...

...apology sport. And so that for me is kind of word challenge. It has started, and it even was happened to me in college. I was a communications major. I thought I want to go to broadcasting in journalism and be the next anchor on a news and then I met that little eight year old girl and I realized I've wanted to be a voice and I knew if I went to donal school I could be a better speaker than without that education behind me. And even in College I had a career counselor, I remembered her, and she looked up to me and said I was crazy. She said your grades are so far they're unempuer. Extra curate or activities are unimpressive. You should just be focused on getting married after college, having a family and doing something just in your field. And guess what, I was the first person in my college in the dental school right after I graduating. The four years for me, I think it's just it's cushing all those naysayers and it's really digging down and think it. Okay, what can I do to cent apart? What can I do when I walk into a dental school interview or act walk into a military board room and I have to be prepared that, no matter whatever question they asked me, I can answer a company and was certainty, because to me, that is what challenging the Scottish Cope's being a leader and it's doing the task that no one wants to do, but you're doing them really, really well. I love that because as women we do have these designated roles in the fact that someone at your at such a young age, is such an impressionable age where to come to you and tell you, you know what, you should just do x, you should just do the most minimal and just become a parent and get married and X, Y Z, and then that's your life the end. Don't ask for more, and you're like, I don't think so, there's more out here. It sounds like every time somebody tells you you can't do something, you don't even just do it, you excel above that. Do you think that that's like the root of your drive? I definitely would say it's definitely up there with the root of my drive and and, by the way, all my friends who are married and have kids and still do this, my hat goes...

...off to you. So just, yeah, that just for me how things worked up. But yeah, I would definitely would say it is just because I never felt society or other people should put limits on what you can and can't do. You should decide what you're capable of doing and then surround yourself with the support net work to help you get there. I always told people no one is great at everything, even people who have a natural ability, it only takes them so far. It's putting in the time, the energy, ability to learn, the ability to be humble and know that, hey, I need to spend more time and this that really makes you great at something, even being a leader in the military. There is so much I am learning and so much I continue or because, let's be honest, you don't learn some of these things by just going to school. You learn. I've been experience that I'm working with other people and sometimes you gotta fall down to learn how to pick yourself up. Oh, absolutely everyone fails. We all fail all day long. We do, we do, and you know, I think there's gifts in our failures, because the gift is that we learn from them. We not when we always say things right the first time, but it I think it'll. It really focus us in and it makes us think, okay, how bad do you really want this? You know, is that failure a big raw that you're climbing over? Is it a I'm mounting? You want to you know, you want to hike, or is it a job or industry that you're trying to break into? And now you got to think about it in a different way and be very innovated, innovative in the way you go about it. So absolutely, absolutely. So tell me, how, how were you when you were a little girl? Like? What were the things that that you used to do as a child? What were the things that used to excite you? Well, I played the violin for six years. I started when I was four years old. So I had a baby Kawasake, and I I just remembered music was a way that I would focus. It would almost calm me as a child. I was sad that I had to give it up at one point, by no fault of my parents, but we were at a place where we just, I was we just couldn't keep continuing lessons, but that was a lot of fun. And then also doing karate with my brother. I have such...

...wonderful memories of us doing Karaday together and then using them when we were about nine ten years old. My Dad was station and Kaneoe Bay Marine based in Hawaii. It was Operation Desert Storm, so at that time a lot of DADS were gone from the base and one of the things I loved were, on a military basis, how close she became with the kids, because all of us were the new kids in school. Everyone had to move every couple of years, so everyone kind of was on that kind of that same foundation, that same stopping ground. Well, one here I took my brother chick or treating and because we lived in a military neighborhood, my mom would let us go up by ourselves. So here we are at ten and seven. We feel like we're King of the world because we got to do something without mom. Well, I remember going across the street and we went through this maze of garage and then when I got through it there was the booking man. So when I saw the booking man, guess what I did? I kicked it, I punched it, I decked it, I had. My brother grabbed the candy, because that's what's important. When you were seven year and ten years old. You want to make sure get the good stuff, to get the candy, and ran out of their screen. Next Day my mom told me that had to apologize to Mr Johnson across the street and I told her said no, mom, I I kicked the BOOKIEYMAN's but Mr Johnson to be thinking, I didn't know the book am was Mr Johnson until I saw black eye and say, Oh my God. So that was how I was as a little kid. I may be small, but I packed a lot of dynamite. Is beating up men at a young age off this day? Okay, man, when you're ten years old, those things exist. Monsters exists. So you know, hey, those are the important things. But yes, that's that's probably a glimpse of my child before you. Yeah, that makes total sense. Right. You get to you get through a challenge and then there's one obstacle facing you right in before you get to the prize and you just like beat it up and go straight for the candy. Exactly now. That fast forward to where you are now. What do you think were the most important lessons you learned as a child that you still utilize...

...now in your adulthood. I would say thanking people. You sending someone a I always like to hand right thank you hearts if I can, to people, or a personalized email if I don't have someone's mail and address. But to me, that's one thing I definitely always are my parents always said, as you know, never underestimate the power thank you because, let's be honest, when we get a handwritten Carter, we get an unexpected message about someone, how someone appreciates us or how we made a difference in someone's life. That really it makes this feel good and, let's be honest, our mind can't hold positive native thoughts. I can only hold one of the other, so I m myself fill it up with some positive thoughts. Another thing that I would have to say that I learned from grown up that I find now is to never stop learning, never stop asking for help, and don't stop asking until you get the help you need. I struggled a lot with testing anxiety growing up and it hit me hard and demo school. I mean so hard that I almost lost my scholarship, I almost lost my dream, everything, and it wasn't until I had a professor who looked out for me until this day. I am each heernally grateful to her. Her name is Dr Galbreth, and she helped me work through that. And so many people along the way have become parents to me and so to me. That, I think, is something that I learned grow moving around so much, is not only thank you people, but also keeping connected to those people, because in a world where we live, where we are so connected, to have those true, authentic connections is really hard to find and once you have them, you don't want to let them go. I love that you said there's that space of not being afraid to ask for help. How long did it take you to reach out and finally, I can't do this, I'm going to lose my dream. How long? Because I know for myself and if I'm not mistaken, and I'm sure there's a lot of people who are listening right now, tend to be those Alpha females who think that we can just take on the world, we pivot, we challenge, we X Y and Z, but you mentioned you got to this point where you were two seconds away...

...from losing your dream and you ask for help and it's like, how long did it take you to get there? How long did it take you to see I need help? I was twenty two years old, so it took me twenty two years to ask for it. Yeah, I think as I'm an Alpha female too, so I can definitely relate, because sometimes you're used to being strong and used to being on and you're not the person who cries. You're not the person who shows weakness and in trust me, being raised in a military family, we were told not to cry. Ever, like I think I've only seen my father cried twice in my entire life to this day. But what I also realized is older I got, you don't want to say you know something and you really don't, because people can see through that, and when you're not getting with it doesn't make you attractive. And I think what I've learned is also when you're humble or when you admit to people you know what. Hey, listen, I don't know this, but guess what I want to learn. Can you help me? And I'm only to do it. You're like, wow, this person is letting me in to her world, she wants to learn from me. So in some ways you are empowering someone else and they're looking at you with a different set of Lens, because it's showing that you're approachable, that you're relatable, that you're empathetic, which are all qualities that we admire some of the some of the most powerful leaders today. I mean, look at Nelson Mandela. He's probably one of the most celebrated leaders in the world and those are some of the qualities that he has. To me, yes, I was twenty two, I was struggling. I asked a teacher for help and I was really glad that she, being a strong Alpha am on herself. She's we're going to do is so you got this, and that's where I kind of got nervous and trilled up, and she gave you an oral exam on the spot, and that's how I learned how to work through my testing anxiety. But I guess for me it's surrounding yourself with other strong females who can also see that in you and help bring that out in and listen. There is definitely strength and vulnerability, and when you can show people that you're competently vulnerable, it makes you more attractive and makes people want to get to know me. And, let's be honest, as an Alpha female. We want to surround ourselves...

...with as many of our tribe as we do let and we can attract more people in network right being that way, that's awesome. I definitely challenge every l that everyone in your audience to think that I'm looking at area life they're struggling, to ask for help and they will be astonished just the help that they'll get from their network or people that they would less likely not think other worst. Absolutely, I agree with you a hundred percent. For me, I over the last year. I didn't realize how much stuff I had really gotten accomplished. Rights for all of you guys who've been following me from the beginning, I just made a year in the podcast, literally May of two thousand and nineteen, and what has happened and what's come from that would not have been possible had I not have asked for help. I think one of the things, too, that I ask you all to give yourselves credit for is every little thing that you do every single day. And the reason why I say this is because when you are a strong person, when you were going at it a thousand miles an hour, maybe your mother, maybe you're stay at home mom, and and there's all these things that your kids are doing daily and you feel like maybe there isn't anything that you're accomplishing. But here's the thing. You're developing children daily. That's something that's a task that is grueling and demanding that you don't have time off as a full time mom. And the same goes for people who are out here developing their careers and people who are multi tasking and multi development or developing multi talents at the same time. We don't necessarily give ourselves credit for the little things that happen from point a to point B. Right those little things are the ones that really create the foundation for all of these things and I just I guess for me, I just naturally thought people just push through and are just doing so many things regularly until I was in this accelerator program this year to help me kick start and launch the letting a podcasters network. Are stressing out. I'm having this freak out moment. Do you not see everything that you've done over the last year? If I were to take you and put you in a space and tell every single person that you've come in contact with or every single person that you have you know left with a little piece of yourself that really just...

...kind of help them get a little bit better. If I were to put all of them in a room and tell them that you think that they're not enough, how do you think they would feel? And I'm like, no, I didn't say that right. I never say that they're not enough, but it's like, no, that's how that's how it is. When you don't take into consideration the little accomplishments that you do every single day, it's basically taking every single little person, everything that you've done over the last year, look them in the face and say you're not enough. Yeah, there's definitely a lot of truth of what you're saying. Aimn sister. Yeah, I one hundred percent agree with you. We take it for granted. Each totally take it for granted. But you know, I think it's also part of being like the Feminine Right, the Woman Who is supposed to be the mother, the caregiver, the housekeeper, the teacher, the leader, the nowadays, the professional is well and in some cases at home, some women who are the primary caregivers for the house hold or the primary salary for the house is we wear so many hats and we forget to give ourselves just that much credit and, like you said, we're afraid to ask for health because we're supposed to just be these perfect figures, right like we're supposed to just be perfect. We have to give ourselves credit to yeah, I one thing that I definitely learned from a lot of great books I've read and podcast I listen to. It's really great to be a woman right now, let's be honest. I even think sometimes my buddies that are guys almost don't know how to act in this age of women who do it all. One thing I've learned is, like you can do it all, just not all at once. kind of like if I when I go back to the states, I love going in out Burger. That's one of the things I miss is like a really good hamburger. I could have the Burger, but I just kind of have the milkshaken fries also together with it. At the same time. It's not good for my ways life, but there's there's something be said by that and it's and it's okay asking for help, and I think when women, strong women, admit that they need help or they have a nanny or they have someone so they can do something, I think that's great. There it's it makes them human and real and, let's be let's be honest, perfect can be boring. I want someone who's real, who gets me,...

...who understands if a child is screaming three years old in the supermarket, causing his scene, and you're just like, I don't have a three year old, but I feel so much for that mom right now. I think there's a there's a lot to be said in that. I by the way, I come on, all my friends were a moms right now who are working from home and homeschooling. You guys are the real superheroes to me right now. I don't know how y'all do it right. I just want to I want to piggyback off of what curringe is said, but yeah, absolutely, to all the MOMS who are listening to us, who've turned into teachers and on top of everything else, my God, you guys deserve this. Should be the nurses, doctors and everyone. They should get a massive award, and then the mothers who had to be the stay at home teachers and moms and everything else they'll should get an award just as big, because I don't know how you do it. Guys. I just have my dog and he drives me crazy and I can't even imagine that's just an animal, like children who are asking you and talking to you and and then you have to teach them and all these things. Yeah, you guys deserve a massive award. And if there are men who are listening to me, who are husband's, appreciate your wives. Put them on bigger pedestals than there on now, because they deserve that and much more for everything that they do so well current. Let me ask you another question. Right our listeners, women between majority of them are women between the ages of twenty two and forty five. Okay, so they live all around the world, majority in the US, but we do have international listenership, which is really exciting and now hopefully in Sicily to it. But if it was one thing that you can walk away from this episode and know that you left your little seed, you planted your seed with all these women, what would you want them to take away from this episode? I would want them to think about something in the life that they really want to achieve, something they may be put on the back burner, maybe something that someone told them that they couldn't do when they believed it or they...

...never felt like they had the right tools or the right people. And I want them to think about that and write it down. Put It on a post and note, put it on a vision for word, put it on your phone, something that you look at every single day, because when you look at something every single day, it'll become important to it'll become a priority to you to eventually then you're starting to think about what can I do to get there? What can I do to make this happen? What steps can I break it down? Because, let's be honest, I didn't wake up one day and became an orthodonest. I didn't wake it one day become a commander. Maybe it was a series of steps. It was a series of many people who were mentored to me, coached me, trained me, took a chance on me. That help get me there. And with anything great in life, it doesn't come easy. I mean, let's be honest, greatness comes from outside your comfort zones. So to me, think about that one thing and and and take that as from a small, five foot three fatigue girl who's told that you would never maut anything and join a military and get to a rank. That only point two nine percent of entire females and maybe made. I still can't believe I'm miss ring, by the way. I don't feel like I look like I'm commander. What or what I'm telling you is that if a Malibu Barbie, that was my nickname, is still a nickname, can actually do this, you can do and there's nothing stopping you except for yourself, but your biggest tree leader. Go out there, make it happen and do it because you are truly unstoppable. That is amazing and I love that you said that because it's absolutely true. The entire thing, plus what you said at the end about challenging and we're being the ones who put lock ourselves from those things. It's like, if you have that strength in your drive, then you'll know you have to move past your bs right and so absolutely have you ever gotten to a point where you've gotten in your own way? Oh Yeah, where that? where? That's with that one time you blocked yourself from from your blessings and it kind of just like...

...halted the drive to push you forward. That's going to be a great this is not going to be as impressive example as the becoming it, working my way to military, but it's cooking, believe it or not, actually cooking. I know your everyone about this is like cooking. Yes, so let me preface it that my father, besides being a Denis, almost went to colinary school. He's at the fantastic chef. My mother the same way, and so was my brother. So it's growing up. I could escape my way of helping out the kitchen because I love helping out the ends. Now fast forward where I am in Italy, where there's Costa and pizza and wine and Alto and it's everywhere, and I've got a train to be a phenomenal shape for the military, to be a great shape for these patcheants, and I can't eat any of it and I don't have no prep services. You know I don't. I can't do any of that. So guess what? I learned to cook and I was finding it hard, and now I didn't know want to learn how to cut vegetables. I had tools that were outdated. And guess what, I have fallen in love with it. I have the best ingredients here in the world in Italy. I don't even use dressing on myself because a tomato and let us I never knew that they could taste the way they taste here because everything is organic. And, by the way, if y'all come to Italy, if you have any milk allergies, guess whatter glute an allergies, you can eat everything here. I'm telling you, there's no thousand ingredients in the pasta or the milk. Literally, all my friends have come over here with those allergies, come here and eat everything and then they don't want to go back because the footios just is not the same. Yes, cooking, and during quarantine, my new thing I got into was baking, making really healthy treats, and so I did not eat them all. I would bring to my hospital and pass out banana bread or protein pancakes or chocolate chip cookie dough balls that I made with protein powders. So, yes, cooking got in my way, but once I did it and I got into it, I felt better, my skin look better and it's just so, so funny, something so simple that all of you are probably...

...laughing. You're like, I learned this when I kid. It took me in my s to get to this place. So yes, cooking, cooking was her block and her driving guy. I mean know what, that's the thing. Okay, so I was cooking for you is cooking for somebody. I know mine is laundry. I hate laundry. Oh my God, it's laundry, but it's also I mean, I also have this weird thing where, like there are moments where I could be going a thousand miles an hour and everything's going great and then all of a sudden I just exhaust out and I slow down and it's almost like to a screeching halt and figuring out how to get past that part. It's like, how do you get past that mental block? It's kind of like what you were saying with your food. It's if I don't do this, nobody else can do it for me. There's no real prep service out there for you. And then, once you were able to move past that space, now you know you have great ingredients, you're falling in love with something that's brand new to you, and now you're even sharing that with the world. Right. I think it's really it's really telling. It doesn't it doesn't necessarily just have to be food. And if it is something like that, look at the benefits that you can get from moving past that and continuing on with the journey. Pushing yourself and letting that drive continue to just kind of it's like a wave, right, I guess that wave, it just pushes you through into the ocean and then see the everything else that was out there. So now parents also going to be putting out a cookbook? Oh, I don't know about that. I all means I'm getting corrected left and right from all my friends, but you know, it's fun, I know. What I would tell is that it's another way to bond and and living in the country that is surrounded by food, I and I was a social person, if y'all can tell by how the I'm talking is, I found it's a great way to entertain, it's greatly to connect with others and when, let's be honest, when someone breaks through to work, that person is like your best friend for the day, or when they bring in one of your your favorite recipes and you maybe forgot something,...

...oh my gosh, you're save. Or because, let's be honest, someone who knows how to cook, they you're going to always want to go to your house, are always going to want to beat up with them, because you know you're going to leave with your heart and your stomach very pleasantly ful. So yeah, yes, I absolutely agree. Well, this has been such an awesome pleasure to have you on the show, but I always like to close the show off now with one question, and I think this tends to be pretty I like to see like the different dynamic of what people have inside of themselves, and it always comes out with this question. If if you were to walk outside today and someone told you that you had ten million dollars in your bank account, how would you spend it? Gosh, well, the professional person to me is I would go to my accountant and find out how I could donate as much of it legally without getting myself in trouble with the IRS. Actually, I would have to say there is, there's so many things I'd love to do with that. I for starters, I really believe in the form of higher education, if that, but if that can mean that I could help up my nephew, if that means that I could put it in a fun to help help people get the scholarships that they need to go to a higher degree, that probably be the one place that I would want to put that money, in some sort of foundation where that ten million can possibly grow and then over time, is it pays out dividends to people who go to school. It could help and serve out more. So could be something that could continue in long lasting and I say that because I was on the scholarship. I was on a scholarship. How my dental school paid for? Most people don't know, but donal school and the US is incredibly expensive. Most of my colleagues graduate anywhere between three, fifty, two a million dollars in debt, depending on the school they go to. It is expensive. Wow. So, to you know what, I was grateful that I got this college to the military. They paid for it and I'm proud to serve and I continue to serve. But you know, I know sometimes the Militari isn't for everyone and would it be a great way...

...to have something that lit leaves that financial burden work they can truly be a hundred percent focused on their education and becoming the best teacher, the best doctor, the best lawyer, the best, you name it, entrepreneur for their future business some day, and so that would be one way that I would definitely go about it. Wow, I love that and the fact that you shed light on the how expensive education is. Oh my God, a million dollars in debt. So now you know, guys, why our insurance doesn't necessarily cover everything we go to the dental office. Oh Man, you made me not feel so bad. Anyway, you make me feel bad for like complaining every time I go to the dentist for how expensive it is, but now it makes total sense. Yeah, yeah, so, wow. Yeah, that's off to all my friends who are graduating right now, all my friends from practices right now. I know you are itching for things open back up because it's expensive. I get it, and right now I have Uncle Sam pay to build, but I can only imagine being a entrepreneur. We're running office. Yeah, a lot of money. Yeah, well, thank you for that insight. I really appreciated having you on today and I encourage everyone who's listening today to take what Grin said and taking in the consideration right make sure that, when it comes down to drive, that you're looking to also move past those roadblocks, as simple or as big as they may be, and also look towards your foundation. What are those things that you can take with you along the way in your journey of life? And then make sure to think all your orthodontist and your dentists out there, guys. Yes, and we can understand you, by the way, when we ask you questions and our hands in your mouth, just say y'all know we can't understanding. We learn very quickly that a school had it how to do that very easily. Oh, oh well, it was such a pleasure to have you. Thank you so much for joining me on empowerment and all that podcast for the pleasures all my thank you so much and have a wonderful rest of the day. Thank you too. Thanks for tuning in to empowerment and all that podcast with your host, read of Bautista. Want to help me grow the...

...listener tribe. Make sure to subscribe to this podcast and follow us on instagram and facebook. Under empowerment and all that, and remember, keep it positive or don't keep it at all.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (34)